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  • Agent Orange Decision

    http://www.military.com/features/0,1...RC=retirees.nl
    My worst jump story:
    My 13th jump was on the 13th day of the month, aircraft number 013.
    As recorded on my DA Form 1307 Individual Jump Log.
    No lie.

    ~
    "Everything looks all right. Have a good jump, eh."
    -2 Commando Jumpmaster

  • #2
    So,Vietnam veterans are still being pi$$ed and cra&&ed upon by their elected legislators. Exactly as it was in the 60s and 70s. Nothing new there.

    Gee, I wonder why I want the SOBs voted out.
    "If you are right, then you are right even if everyone says you are wrong. If you are wrong then you are wrong even if everyone says you are right." William Penn.

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    • #3
      http://www.king5.com/news/local/mary...vice/235704361

      Marysville Vietnam vet afflicted by Agent Orange recognized for service

      MARYSVILLE - At just 19 years old, Walter Jones enlisted in the Marine Corps to fight in Vietnam. Brave, strong and committed, he was more than just a good Marine.

      “He was the guy of my dreams,” smiles his wife Carolyn.

      Jones survived 19 months in-theatre, 63 missions and an attack on his helicopter that killed his crew chief. When he returned home he married Carolyn and became a successful electrical engineer. Carolyn says things were going well, when out of nowhere, a time bomb exploded.

      “He was just beside himself because he knew the diagnosis was not good. The survival rate was very poor.”

      It was a rare form of non-Hodgkin lymphoma brought on by Agent Orange. Thirty-five years after Jones returned home from Vietnam, a silent killer ended his life in just three months.

      Jones was only 54 years old.

      “We were just devastated,” says Carolyn. “There’s so much anger. Anger at the government, bitterness. They knew about this."

      Agent Orange was used as a defoliant by American forces on the jungles of Vietnam. The carcinogenic effects of the chemical were denied by the U.S. for decades. While vets killed in action were honored with that famous memorial wall, Marines like Jones got nothing.

      “He wasn't killed in Vietnam,” says Carolyn, “but Vietnam stayed with him until he did pass.”

      Now, however, Jones will get the recognition he deserves.

      The same organization behind the Vietnam Memorial Wall is honoring those killed by Agent Orange, suicide, and other war-related conditions with a ceremony in Washington, D.C., next week.

      “For so long there wasn't any recognition. To have them recognized now is just so important,” says Carolyn.

      On June 18, the Vietnam Veterans Memorial Fund will induct 312 service members into the Vietnam Veterans Memorial Fund’s In Memory Program. The program honors Vietnam veterans whose lives were cut short as a result of their service in Vietnam, but are not eligible for inscription on The Wall under Department of Defense guidelines.

      During the In Memory ceremony, the names of all the honorees are read aloud and certificates bearing the honorees' names are placed at The Wall. These certificates are later collected by the National Park Service and stored in a permanent archive.

      In Memory began in 1999 and has since honored more than 2,500 veterans. The plaque that honors these veterans was dedicated as a part of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial in 2004. It reads: "In Memory of the men and women who served in the Vietnam War and later died as a result of their service. We honor and remember their sacrifice."


      Click on the above link for the video
      "War is hell, but actual combat is a motherf#cker"
      - Col. David Hackworth

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      • #4
        I have often wondered how many from this board suffer from the effects of Agent Orange. I have diabetes and neuropathy which showed up in my mid to late forties. I am fortunate in Tulsa to have a good VA facility for treatment.

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        • #5
          A good friend of mine who was a Vietnam vet died two years ago. It was the Agent Orange that killed, just many years later. He knew he was going to die younger than he should because of it and wrote the most amazing eulogy on his behalf. His eulogy wasn't bitter or angry, but honored his family and brought attention to the impact of Agent Orange on Vietnam veterans.

          I'm glad some people are honoring people like my friend, but its not enough. Not even close.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Biscuit View Post
            A good friend of mine who was a Vietnam vet died two years ago. It was the Agent Orange that killed, just many years later. He knew he was going to die younger than he should because of it and wrote the most amazing eulogy on his behalf. His eulogy wasn't bitter or angry, but honored his family and brought attention to the impact of Agent Orange on Vietnam veterans.

            I'm glad some people are honoring people like my friend, but its not enough. Not even close.
            You are very right - it is not even close. That being said, it is a nice gesture for the families of such ones who suffered and experienced a shortened life. I hope it will give those surviving family members some peace and closure. We must NEVER let something like this EVER happen again!!!!
            "War is hell, but actual combat is a motherf#cker"
            - Col. David Hackworth

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by DeltaOne View Post
              You are very right - it is not even close. That being said, it is a nice gesture for the families of such ones who suffered and experienced a shortened life. I hope it will give those surviving family members some peace and closure. We must NEVER let something like this EVER happen again!!!!
              Its a great thing for the families, and I believe that Paul smiles when he looks down from heaven and sees things like this.

              I don't know how we can stop it though from happening again. The government never fesses up about the harm its new weapons can do, when they aren't supposed to being that particular kind of harm. People discover it and make the government fess up later, sometimes much later.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Biscuit View Post
                Its a great thing for the families, and I believe that Paul smiles when he looks down from heaven and sees things like this.

                I don't know how we can stop it though from happening again. The government never fesses up about the harm its new weapons can do, when they aren't supposed to being that particular kind of harm. People discover it and make the government fess up later, sometimes much later.
                I feel for those who suffer the effects of Gulf War Syndrome as well. I guess that could be of a similar vein closer to today.
                "War is hell, but actual combat is a motherf#cker"
                - Col. David Hackworth

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by DeltaOne View Post
                  I feel for those who suffer the effects of Gulf War Syndrome as well. I guess that could be of a similar vein closer to today.
                  I do too.

                  No matter what happens to me, I don't think I can ever have it as bad as you guys. Today, we enjoy good public support. I do Funeral Honor Guard, and live in one of the liberal epicenters of the country. Overall, everyone has been very supportive and a lot of people thank me for my service. Its the Vietnam era people - the people who would have been drafted. I think its because they know how badly you guys were treated. They all knew someone. I don't feel like I've earned it though. The combat vets deserve it. The active duty component deserves it. My part means so much to me, but is so small in the big picture.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Biscuit View Post
                    I do too.

                    No matter what happens to me, I don't think I can ever have it as bad as you guys. Today, we enjoy good public support. I do Funeral Honor Guard, and live in one of the liberal epicenters of the country. Overall, everyone has been very supportive and a lot of people thank me for my service. Its the Vietnam era people - the people who would have been drafted. I think its because they know how badly you guys were treated. They all knew someone. I don't feel like I've earned it though. The combat vets deserve it. The active duty component deserves it. My part means so much to me, but is so small in the big picture.
                    Everyone who serves their country deserves respect, honesty, integrity, and support. I thank you for your service.
                    The Vietnam conflict was, and still is for some, a very painful chapter in our nation's history. I wish father time would heal all painful memories but we know that will never happen for many.
                    Over the years, I have made an effort to educate my kids and grandchildren. I did likewise with my workmates and neighbors. That's about all we can do to lessen the chances for the errors, made willingly or accidental, from repeating over and over again. I think is also absolutely vital for veterans from conflicts in the past to be there and support those who are looked upon to protect our country today. We learned a lot of hard lessons and if we don't share these with others, then we are part of the problem today.
                    I wish you a wonderful day Heather. Again, thank you for your service.
                    "War is hell, but actual combat is a motherf#cker"
                    - Col. David Hackworth

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by DeltaOne View Post
                      Everyone who serves their country deserves respect, honesty, integrity, and support. I thank you for your service.
                      The Vietnam conflict was, and still is for some, a very painful chapter in our nation's history. I wish father time would heal all painful memories but we know that will never happen for many.
                      Over the years, I have made an effort to educate my kids and grandchildren. I did likewise with my workmates and neighbors. That's about all we can do to lessen the chances for the errors, made willingly or accidental, from repeating over and over again. I think is also absolutely vital for veterans from conflicts in the past to be there and support those who are looked upon to protect our country today. We learned a lot of hard lessons and if we don't share these with others, then we are part of the problem today.
                      I wish you a wonderful day Heather. Again, thank you for your service.
                      Thanks Don! There's an gentleman at my American Legion post that is very purposeful about supporting vets, and sharing the lessons he has learned. I have a lot of respect for him.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        We need to force our government to accept full responsibility for the effects of military service.

                        That is the only acceptable and fair "solution".

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          We will go away one man at a time...we have elected very few who purport to represent us in the last 75 years.

                          Blue Water Navy, after years of the fight, only have 43 Senators' support.

                          Just die guys...solve the problem.
                          Skip

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Mountain Man View Post
                            [FONT=Lucida Sans Unicode]We need to force our government to accept full responsibility for the effects of military service.
                            Never going to happen, never expected it and mentally prepared myself for it, (I take care of me) it's lip service only, expecting politicians to make good on their promises is like pissing in to a 25 mph wind and expecting not to get soaked with ****.
                            Trying hard to be the Man, that my Dog believes I am!

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Trung Si View Post
                              (I take care of me)
                              NAILED IT !!!

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