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1st Inf Div Fundamentals of Infantry Tactics

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  • 1st Inf Div Fundamentals of Infantry Tactics

    The 1st Infantry Division Commander was Gen Hay during my tour in Vietnam (1967/68) and these are basically the tactics we followed. This document is fairly thorough and is his "directive" to all Commanders from Company on up (i.e. Companies, Battalions, and Brigades). Us lowly Lt's never received these "written" directives - a shame - might have explained a lot of stuff to us and our troops. Anyway this document contains 83 pages of great stuff for all you folks wondering how we INFANTRY folks did things - heeheehee and why, "Because the General said so".

    The 83 pages may take a few to load - be patient... it's a good INFORMATIVE presentation.

    http://www.dtic.mil/cgi-bin/GetTRDoc...c=GetTRDoc.pdf

    P.S. Boonie and Altus, I have found WHO I was fighting. Table I in the above document provides a very good list of the 1st Div's enemy forces - check it out on PDF pages 16 and 17 (document numbered pages 12 and 13).


    1st ID, 1/28th '67/'68 Phouc Vinh & Quan Loi
    Skirmishes Bu Dop Dec-67, An My, Thu Duc Feb-68
    Plt. Ldr - CIB, Purple Hearts, Silver Star
    What we write can be considered to be a reflection of our SOUL providing others to know our CHARACTER.

  • #2
    Hi Ken,

    Originally posted by KEN JENSEN View Post
    P.S. Boonie and Altus, I have found WHO I was fighting. Table I in the above document provides a very good list of the 1st Div's enemy forces - check it out on PDF pages 16 and 17 (document numbered pages 12 and 13).
    The 9th and the 7th were both widely known. The local units were in turn nearly intractable. The C prefix generally refers to companies, while the K prefix - battalions.

    Have you found which one exactly your platoon/company, not your entire brigade/division, was fighting?

    Comment


    • #3
      Establishing the enemy's orbat wasn't that hardest part, US forces had generally a very good knowledge of who they were facing. Pinpointing their exact location on the other hand was the real challenge.

      Comment


      • #4
        Boonie
        Establishing the enemy's orbat wasn't that hardest part, US forces had generally a very good knowledge of who they were facing. Pinpointing their exact location on the other hand was the real challenge.

        Altus
        The 9th and the 7th were both widely known. The local units were in turn nearly intractable. The C prefix generally refers to companies, while the K prefix - battalions.

        Have you found which one exactly your platoon/company, not your entire brigade/division, was fighting?

        The only information I had when I was on the ground in Vietnam, leading my Platoon, was that the main enemy we were fighting was the 9th VC Division and Local Guerrillas.

        Since joining this forum, and the receipt of my Daily Journals, and additional information sources you folks (especially Boonierat) has provided me; such as making me aware that there were After Action Reports, and Lessons Learned Reports. And you of course Altus, with many pieces of information regarding MY enemy and their structure (hell I didn’t know there was a difference between NVA, PLAF, PAVN, whatever); all I knew was those not in uniforms were Guerrillas and those in uniform were NVA (“Hard Core” is what we called them) and they were all just VC. I have learned many things and am still learning and trying to piece it all together.

        As you know Altus, I have over 300 pages of Daily Journal Logs and only a few (less than 20 probably) ever mention enemy unit names. When the logs were created (as action took place hour by hour, minute by minute) the enemy was really not known unless our Battalion knew in advance through S2 (Intel) as to who we were fighting (most the time it was a surprise – the dumb chits) and/or if documents were captured and brought to Battalion before the day ended and they could make a notation in the log. Most information about the enemy was discovered AFTER THE FACT and placed into the AAR’s (After Action Reports).

        P.S. Maybe in another thread we can discuss more enemy structure questions.

        One that lingers in my mind, especially with Boonie’s statement “Pinpointing their exact location” and you Altus, with your nice choice of the word “intractable”…..Were the enemy Platoons under Command of Companies, and were the Companies under command of Battalions and/or Regiments?

        As for me knowing the EXACT enemy units I encountered – some I know and some I don’t know – but don’t have it all pieced together yet. Also in another thread would like to know District Boundaries – we'll address this stuff later (I hope).

        Getting back to the theme of this thread (TACTICS); I will say this….
        The Local Guerrillas constantly “harassed” us no matter where we were. They kept us sharp, “on our toes”, and ready for anything – one might say the guerrilla tactics back-fired on them – they DAILY improved our skills in dealing with them (the Guerrillas), and the “Hard Core” folks suffered because of our developed skills - - to bad we rotated out on a yearly basis.


        1st ID, 1/28th '67/'68 Phouc Vinh & Quan Loi
        Skirmishes Bu Dop Dec-67, An My, Thu Duc Feb-68
        Plt. Ldr - CIB, Purple Hearts, Silver Star
        What we write can be considered to be a reflection of our SOUL providing others to know our CHARACTER.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by KEN JENSEN View Post
          One that lingers in my mind, especially with Boonie’s statement “Pinpointing their exact location” and you Altus, with your nice choice of the word “intractable”…..Were the enemy Platoons under Command of Companies, and were the Companies under command of Battalions and/or Regiments?
          Well they are "intractable" also in the sense that, in contrast to regular main force units like the 5th, 7th or 9th, information on most those C and K local units are today virtually nowhere to be found for history amateurs.

          Those units, though local, were full regular PAVN units, their members had full status of PAVN servicemen, and were under ordinary military chain of commands. The local village guerrillas which were armed but were not full elements of PAVN units might have more relaxed command hierarchy, but as I understand, they typically had a commander who would follow orders of regular unit commanders whenever attached in action.

          Comment

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