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Dong Xoai: Green Beret Graphic Novel

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  • Dong Xoai: Green Beret Graphic Novel

    Thought this might interest some: A graphic novel about berets in Vietnam in 1965. Not really my thing, but I rather like the look of this bloke's artwork.

    http://www.usatoday.com/life/comics/...m?csp=obinsite
    A massive attack...a brigade against an army...three nights of battle...an unforgettable tragedy.
    Sixty years later, the full story is told at last:
    http://tothelastround.wordpress.com/

  • #2
    Wasn't that where Green Beret Michael J. Hand (famous in Australia as a banking visionary) earned his DSC?

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    • #3
      Wasn't that where . . . Michael J. Hand (famous in Australia as a banking visionary) earned his DSC?
      Yesterday 11:09
      If memory serves, yes it is. p.s., the Green Beret is a hat, not the soldier wearing it, unless they're some REMF.
      dit: Lirelou

      Phong trần mài một lưỡi gươm, Những loài giá áo túi cơm sá ǵ!

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      • #4
        Originally posted by lirelou View Post
        the Green Beret is a hat, not the soldier wearing it, unless they're some REMF.
        Oh sure, but just try to take their little green hat away from them and see what happens


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        • #5
          Originally posted by lirelou View Post
          If memory serves, yes it is. p.s., the Green Beret is a hat, not the soldier wearing it, unless they're some REMF.
          This is focused (in great detail, I might add) on the chopper's side of things, but I assume this is the battle we're talking about.

          http://www.118ahc.org/Dong%20Xoai.htm

          This is Ken's neck-of-the-woods, right?

          Doug

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          • #6
            h sure, but just try to take their little green hat away from them and see what happens
            Yes, Ms. Saigon, we snivel and cry. But, in our day, everyone assigned to a SF Group wore the beenie, which meant that the army of support types in the SFOB (Nha Trang), C and B Teams, along with the various non-SF detachments, also wore it. By the way, that statue in my day was referred to as 'Bronze Brucie', and many joked that he looked gay based upon his hand gesture. Yet most really sniveled when the SF Command moved that statue from its old location.
            dit: Lirelou

            Phong trần mài một lưỡi gươm, Những loài giá áo túi cơm sá ǵ!

            Comment


            • #7
              I assume this is the battle we're talking about.
              Yes it is. Mike Hand was a PFC at the time, so a DSC for a PFC is one hell of a statement. Mike later left the Army, returned to Vietnam as a civilian, and then got involved in setting up a Ponzi Scheme under cover of a bank he had created with some Australian partners. As investors in this 'bank', he allegedly targeted civilian and military personnel he knew in Vietnam.
              Eddie's reference is meant to remind us that not all certified combat heroes are necessarily 'good guys'.

              Good link, and thanks.
              dit: Lirelou

              Phong trần mài một lưỡi gươm, Những loài giá áo túi cơm sá ǵ!

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by dougreese View Post
                This is focused (in great detail, I might add) on the chopper's side of things, but I assume this is the battle we're talking about.

                http://www.118ahc.org/Dong%20Xoai.htm

                This is Ken's neck-of-the-woods, right?

                Doug
                Phuoc Vinh and surrounding area was indeed my "neck-of-the-woods". However, this action took place before the 1st Inf Div arrived in Vietnam (1st Div arrived July 1965). And the action took place 2yrs before my arrival (July 1967).

                The location of Dong Xoai in relation to Phuoc Vinh is shown on below GOOGLE EARTH "snap-shot".




                1st ID, 1/28th '67/'68 Phouc Vinh & Quan Loi
                Skirmishes Bu Dop Dec-67, An My, Thu Duc Feb-68
                Plt. Ldr - CIB, Purple Hearts, Silver Star
                What we write can be considered to be a reflection of our SOUL providing others to know our CHARACTER.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by lirelou View Post
                  Yes, Ms. Saigon, we snivel and cry. But, in our day, everyone assigned to a SF Group wore the beenie, which meant that the army of support types in the SFOB (Nha Trang), C and B Teams, along with the various non-SF detachments, also wore it.
                  To be clear, I fall on the side of supporting the "Earned not Issued" side of this issue.

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                  • #10
                    Got a question where and when did the misnomer Green Beret become synonymous with Special Forces?

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by SegaSaturnGamer View Post
                      Got a question where and when did the misnomer Green Beret become synonymous with Special Forces?

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by eddie3rar View Post
                        Wasn't that where Green Beret Michael J. Hand (famous in Australia as a banking visionary) earned his DSC?

                        Michael Hands visionary work in the financial sector is written about in

                        Jonathon Kwitny's THE CRIMES OF PATRIOTS -- A TRUE TALE OF DOPE, DIRTY MONEY, AND THE CIA

                        You can read it on line here.

                        Kwitny suggests that the Sergeant Major of MACV-SOG's CCN



                        was up to a bit of Nugan Hand naughtiness in Libya.


                        Anyone got the skinny on Billy Waugh?

                        Mick
                        Last edited by Chippymick; 15 Feb 11, 22:15.

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                        • #13
                          The green beret was originally designated in 1953 by Special Forces Maj. Herbert Brucker, a veteran of the OSS. Later that year, 1st Lieutenant Roger Pezelle adopted it as the unofficial headgear for his A-team, Operational Detachment FA-32. They wore it whenever they went to the field for prolonged exercises. Soon it spread throughout all of Special Forces, although the Army refused to authorize its official use.

                          Finally, in 1961, President Kennedy planned to visit Fort Bragg. He sent word to the Special Warfare Center commander, Brigadier General William P. Yarborough, for all Special Forces soldiers to wear their berets for the event. President Kennedy felt that since they had a special mission, Special Forces should have something to set them apart from the rest. Even before the presidential request, however, the Department of Army had acquiesced and teletyped a message to the Center authorizing the beret as a part of the Special Forces uniform.

                          When President Kennedy came to Fort Bragg October 12, 1961, Gen. Yarborough wore his green beret to greet the commander-in-chief. The president remarked, "Those are nice. How do you like the green beret?" General Yarborough replied: "They're fine, sir. We've wanted them a long time."
                          from: http://www.specialoperations.com/Arm...Info/Story.htm

                          Regarding about how "it spread throughout Special Forces" At the time in question, the Army had two Special Forces Groups, the 10th (at Bad Tolz) and the 77th (at Fort Bragg). Kennedy didn't invent Special Forces, the Korean War actually did that, although the official story has emphasized a Ranger and Special Service Force heritage rather than the 8240th Army Unit in Korea, which Special Forces did not start, but which drew its final rotation of personnel from the newly formed 10th Special Forces Group before it shipped to Germany, therefore making the Korean War the first War that modern U.S. Army Special Forces personnel fought in. What Kennedy did was to greatly increase its numbers from barely over a thousand real SF operators to roughly 6,000 in an Regular Army that was much larger than it has been in the last 30 years.
                          dit: Lirelou

                          Phong trần mài một lưỡi gươm, Những loài giá áo túi cơm sá ǵ!

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by lirelou View Post
                            from: http://www.specialoperations.com/Arm...Info/Story.htm

                            Regarding about how "it spread throughout Special Forces" At the time in question, the Army had two Special Forces Groups, the 10th (at Bad Tolz) and the 77th (at Fort Bragg). Kennedy didn't invent Special Forces, the Korean War actually did that, although the official story has emphasized a Ranger and Special Service Force heritage rather than the 8240th Army Unit in Korea, which Special Forces did not start, but which drew its final rotation of personnel from the newly formed 10th Special Forces Group before it shipped to Germany, therefore making the Korean War the first War that modern U.S. Army Special Forces personnel fought in. What Kennedy did was to greatly increase its numbers from barely over a thousand real SF operators to roughly 6,000 in an Regular Army that was much larger than it has been in the last 30 years.
                            Hi Lou

                            When did it hit the peak of 6,000?

                            Mick

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                            • #15
                              Mid-60s, when we had the 1st, (Okinawa with some Teams in RVN)) 3rd (Bragg - Africa) , 5th (Vietnam), 6th Bragg - Middle East), 7th (Bragg - LANTCOM with some Teams in RVN) , 8th (Panama - Latin America) , and 10th (Germany - Europe) Special Forces Groups, plus the 46th (Thailand) Special Forces Company. plus the Special Forces Training Group at Fort Bragg. Each Group counted four line companies, the equivalent of today's SF Battalions). By sheer numbers alone, there would have been somewhere around 15,000 SF troops to fill those groups, but not every Group had 4 SF companies, and the Stateside Groups spent times when there were merely holding companies for personnel between tours in Vietnam. Once the war ended, the 3rd, 6th, and 8th Groups became history, along with the 46th Company. Later, the 1st SFG went out of existance, to be revived in the early 80s by cutting an SF Team from each SF Company. Then came Grenada and 1st SOCOM, and the pendulum swung back in the plus direction.
                              dit: Lirelou

                              Phong trần mài một lưỡi gươm, Những loài giá áo túi cơm sá ǵ!

                              Comment

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