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April 30, 1975

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  • April 30, 1975




    -- RR
    www.RadioVietnam.net

  • #2


    -- RR
    www.RadioVietnam.net

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    • #3

      -- RR
      www.RadioVietnam.net

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      • #4






        Last edited by Miss Saigon; 29 Apr 10, 23:56.

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        • #5
          Saigon’s Fall, 35 Years Later

          DEPENDING on which side you were on, Saigon either fell on April 30, 1975, or it was liberated. Inside Vietnam, the day is marked as Liberation Day — but outside, among the Vietnamese refugees, it is called Deep Resentment Day. (The resentment is not just over losing a war, but also a country.)
          FULL ARTICLE - NEW YORK TIMES

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Miss Saigon View Post
            Perhaps you would care to tell us more on the author of this anthem?

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            • #7
              Miss Saigon, great political cartoon! Fortunately or unfortunately depending on ones viewpoint, Americas' penetration into the capitalist enterprises in today's Vietnam consumerism is belated and has been superseded by many other nations partaking in the feeding frenzy who were less reluctant to exploit the emerging market as America was, years ago. America missed the boat, no Starbucks, McDonalds, BOA, Target here yet. The corporations who do come here have found the competition for market penetration very difficult, it will be interesting to see how Carls' Jr. does with their fastfood stores coming soon. The cartoon reminds me more of Thailand! There is a 7-11, BK, MickyDs etc on every corner there. I think more than rumbling would come from Bac Ho, they may have to give him a new coat of Simonize.
              Last edited by sgnsteve; 30 Apr 10, 06:32.
              "If we don't know history, then we are ready meat for carnivorous politicians and the intellectuals and journalists who supply the carving knives." Zell

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              • #8
                "Day of Resentment". First time I've heard that title. Good name, can easily understand it.
                "If you are right, then you are right even if everyone says you are wrong. If you are wrong then you are wrong even if everyone says you are right." William Penn.

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                • #9
                  From the The Vietnam Center and Archive at Texas Tech:

                  Today marks the 35th anniversary of the Fall of Saigon. We have put together an online exhibit full of photos, videos, audio clips of oral histories, and links to documents in our collection pertaining to this event.
                  Looks like they have some interesting stuff:

                  http://www.vietnam.ttu.edu/exhibits/saigon/index.htm

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Boonierat View Post
                    From the The Vietnam Center and Archive at Texas Tech:



                    Looks like they have some interesting stuff:

                    http://www.vietnam.ttu.edu/exhibits/saigon/index.htm
                    The following interview quote says it all for me --

                    I remember '75 when we pulled out of Saigon. I remember that being on live TV. I was looking at the bartender. I remember how sad I was. I wasn’t angry anymore. I was saddened by the whole bug op we did. I thought about all the Vietnamese we left there that we said we could get out and we left them there. That was so damn sad. To this day I can see those Marines on top of the embassy getting into that chopper. I can see them punching people in the face, knocking them away from the chopper. I can see the aircraft carriers dumping helicopters overboard. I can see the Vietnamese flying out. They’re jumping out of their aircraft over the water. Just abandoning those people. That has always stuck in my craw. That we abandoned these people after telling them that we were going to help them. When the tanks rolled into the presidential grounds, I remember that, too. I was thinking what the hell was this about? Was this for nothing? Did my friends die for nothing? Did I go through this for absolutely nothing?
                    - Anthony Goodrich [Oral History #OH0131], Transcript page 95 lines 28–31 page 96 lines 1–9.
                    -- RR
                    www.RadioVietnam.net

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by sgnsteve View Post
                      Miss Saigon, great political cartoon! Fortunately or unfortunately depending on ones viewpoint, Americas' penetration into the capitalist enterprises in today's Vietnam consumerism is belated and has been superseded by many other nations partaking in the feeding frenzy who were less reluctant to exploit the emerging market as America was, years ago. America missed the boat, no Starbucks, McDonalds, BOA, Target here yet.
                      Frankly Steve, I don't really care. I was making a joke. I attach no nationalistic feelings to McDonald's or Starbucks. They are just restaurants of one kind or another. If they are successful or not in Vietnam matters not to me. I believe in Freedom, both political and economic. What you call consumerism I call jobs. Unless we are all going to be farmers, which I have no intention of, then we need consumption to create jobs. After all, people aren't paid unless they produce something that others want to buy. The people of Vietnam need jobs and economic growth so that property can reach more than just a minority of people at the top. So if it McDonald's that is successful in Vietnam, or Microsoft, or Siemans, I don't really care. I just care that the economy is growing and these are the the signs that more and more VN will be able to have a better life because of it.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by altus View Post
                        Perhaps you would care to tell us more on the author of this anthem?
                        You are so right my friend. It says a lot about the tolerance of the South Vietnamese government that they refused to change the song even after the Author became an activist revolutionary. Something like that never could happen in North Vietnam.

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                        • #13
                          The song was conceived in 1939, and its author joined the Viet Minh in 1944, in case you don't know.

                          Originally posted by Miss Saigon View Post
                          Something like that never could happen in North Vietnam.
                          Do you think the US could adopt a national anthem written by, say, Dr Goebbels, in 1941-1945? Had this happened, would it still have said a lot about the tolerance of the USG? Would you really take pride in that "something like this could never happen in Germany"?

                          Or, imagine tomorrow your Congress announces that a song written by a Al Quaeda member would become the US national anthem. Would that have any impact on the public image of your country in the context of your GWOT?
                          Last edited by altus; 30 Apr 10, 18:11.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by altus View Post
                            The song was conceived in 1939, and its author joined the Viet Minh in 1944, in case you don't know.
                            hmmmm I wonder, did he join the Viet Minh because of the Japanese situation?

                            Altus, the following is absurd and you know it -

                            Do you think the US could adopt a national anthem written by, say, Dr Goebbels, in 1941-1945? Had this happened, would it still have said a lot about the tolerance of the USG? Would you really take pride in that "something like this could never happen in Germany"?

                            Or, imagine tomorrow your Congress announces that a song written by a Al Quaeda member would become the US national anthem. Would that have any impact on the public image of your country in the context of your GWOT?
                            Maybe you are familiar with the Wizard of OZ!
                            geee, I wonder if Dorthy would have "clicked" the heels of her little red shoes, maybe Vietnam could have achieved the FREEDOM it deserved!


                            P.S. Would be nice to have English translation of the words contained in the song!


                            1st ID, 1/28th '67/'68 Phouc Vinh & Quan Loi
                            Skirmishes Bu Dop Dec-67, An My, Thu Duc Feb-68
                            Plt. Ldr - CIB, Purple Hearts, Silver Star
                            What we write can be considered to be a reflection of our SOUL providing others to know our CHARACTER.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by altus View Post
                              The song was conceived in 1939, and its author joined the Viet Minh in 1944, in case you don't know.
                              Yes I did know. That is why I said he later became a revolutionary activist. I think this is why the Diem regime refused to change the song. The debated doing so but then decided to retain the song (and the imperial flag too) even though the author went left. They agreed with the youthful sentiment of the song and thought there was no need to replace it, even though the author went awry in his political beliefs. And the Anthem is a slightly modified version from the ones that the revolutionaries sing.

                              Some how I don't see the Politburo in Hanoi ever being that open minded.

                              Do you think the US could adopt a national anthem written by, say, Dr Goebbels, in 1941-1945? Had this happened, would it still have said a lot about the tolerance of the USG? Would you really take pride in that "something like this could never happen in Germany"?

                              Or, imagine tomorrow your Congress announces that a song written by a Al Quaeda member would become the US national anthem. Would that have any impact on the public image of your country in the context of your GWOT?
                              Well, we were not talking about the US, we were talking about the difference between the South Vietnamese Government and the North. Perhaps the South Vietnamese were even more tolerant than the Americans?

                              Even so, I don't think that one could characterize Lưu Hữu Phước as being anywhere similar to Goebbels or Osama Bin Ladin. Would you? If Uncle Ho, Giap, or Phạm Văn Đồng had written the song perhaps the Republic would have decided it was best to change the song

                              I don't see how it reflects negatively on the South Vietnamese government to have retained the song in most of its original form. Especially since they debated the issue and knew what they were doing. To me this reflects favorably upon the GVN.

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