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  • Pssst, Welcome Home

    Today, March 30, is officially national "Welcome Home Vietnam Veterans Day."
    Did you know that?
    I never heard about it until today and that took some lookin'.
    So welcome home fellows.

  • #2
    Welcome home to all us Vietnam Vets, didn't take too long....

    Comment


    • #3
      I appreciate the sentiment but it's a little late.

      I do my vet celebrating and bonding on Veteran's Day & Memorial Day
      Vietnam - Co.A 3/21, 196th Light Infantry Brigade
      Austin "Little Colony" Bastrop 1830 - Republic of Texas
      NRA - Lifer

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by CaptJack View Post
        I appreciate the sentiment but it's a little late.

        I do my vet celebrating and bonding on Veteran's Day & Memorial Day
        In full agreement with you Jack. Mar 30 will NEVER be recognized by me as Vietnam Veterans Day, especially coming from the morons currently running our today's Govt. I really question their sincerity for Vietnam Vets. I will never forget what many of these same folks did during the anti-Vietnam craze period (and then they had babies, that are now teaching the young of today and also holding current Gov't positions) - GO FIGURE! LOL just a few hours from being "all fools day", heeheehee It's like hiring Altus to teach "Government Studies" to our young.



        1st ID, 1/28th '67/'68 Phouc Vinh & Quan Loi
        Skirmishes Bu Dop Dec-67, An My, Thu Duc Feb-68
        Plt. Ldr - CIB, Purple Hearts, Silver Star
        What we write can be considered to be a reflection of our SOUL providing others to know our CHARACTER.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Three-six View Post
          Today, March 30, is officially national "Welcome Home Vietnam Veterans Day." So welcome home fellows.
          I apprecieate the sentiment, but I never left. Oh sure, I sent my body over to Viet Nam to what my country asked, but my heart remained right here in the good old U S of A.

          I'm with Jack and Ken on this. A Congressional declaration from the current group of nothings running this country is more like an insult than anything else. Your mileage may vary.

          Robert
          The reports of my death are greatly exaggerated ~ Mark Twain

          Comment


          • #6
            While I understand exactly why you guys feel the way you do and agree with you, give Three-Six a break. He is just showing his appreciation free of the politics of stupid resolutions.

            You all know how I feel about the games they play in Washington at the expense of our soldiers. No one hates it more than I.

            But you also know how I feel about the vets. So I think I will join with Three-six and say.


            Welcome Home !

            And to hell with Washington!

            Comment


            • #7
              My real welcome home...

              I came home in March of 72 after 24 months in-country. Got out of the Army in September just in time to start classes for the fall semester. A Vietnamese girl came home with me to become my wife [of 38 years now] and the eventual mother of my two kids. Back in school as an undergraduate in the Sculpture Dept of RISD there were plenty of good people around, but also some real jerks who resented me as a Vietnam Vet, some of them faculty members. I rolled with it, too busy to worry about the shortsighted ones, and I immersed myself in the world, school work and home. Having a small, very intelligent, vivacious and lovely Vietnamese wife who obviously didn't think of me as some sort of monster kind of unbalanced the "bad guys" whose image of "Vietnam Vet" I just didn't fit into. But there definitely weren't any parades or hugs.

              In the fall of 73 our daughter was born and that winter with the rest of the country we went through the Arab Oil Embargo. We were renting a third-floor walk-up attic apartment that shared the basement furnace for steam heating with the second floor apartment. I made an agreement with the second floor to share the oil bill, then insulated my apartment and put storm windows all around. Around Christmas the couple on the second floor separated and moved out, leaving an empty apartment. In late January one night the radiators went off, so I phoned the oil company and they sent around an emergency load of oil, enough for a few days. The heat went off again in a few days after the furnace ran out of oil the second time, so I phoned agaiin and got a small emergency delivery, which held us until the oil ran out the third time. When I phoned that night the woman answering the phone told me that I didn't have an account, even though I explained that I had been part of the account for a year and a half. My name wasn't on the paperwork. She agreed to have a salesman come around later in the week to see me and to explain the company's policy. At the time that was Warren Gas & Oil Company.

              We had an electric range in the kitchen so turned the heat up under a couple of big aluminum pots with some water in them, closed the doors to the kitchen and bunked down on the linoleum floor that night. It was a particularly cold winter that year. The following afternoon a small man, dressed in a wool overcoat and cap, climbed up the two flites of stairs and knocked on the door: the salesman for Warren Gas had arrived. I let him in and we sat in the unheated living room with our coats on while he explained to me that because of the Oil Embargo the company was not accepting any new customers. He apologized when I explained to him that I had been sharing the account for 18 months but told me that there was nothing he could do to change the policy. As I wondered what the Hell I was going to do with a wife and new baby in the dead of winter trying to go to school without a heated place to live in, my wife stuck her head in from the kitchen and in her very limited English asked if we would like some hot tea.

              The little salesman had turned to look at her when she opened the kitchen door, and he then turned back to me. "Are you by any chance a veteran, son ??" he asked.

              I answered him that I was, home from Viet Nam in 72, going back to school on the GI Bill, savings, and 3 part-time jobs. He then said that if it was "all the same" he'd be happy to have some hot tea, so we went into the kitchen to sit at the table, taking our coats off in the relative warmth. We talked over the tea. He asked me about my service time and told me that he'd been in the Army that fought its way across Europe in WWII. By and by the tea was finished and he stood up to go, saying that he had to get back to the office. He then told me that he was the senior salesman and if the company wouldn't take me on as a customer he would raise such a stink that they'd never get over it. We shook hands all around and he put cap and coat back on and I walked him down the stairs to street level.

              An hour later a full tank of oil was delivered and we never ran out of oil again for the next year and a half we were in Rhode Island.

              I never saw him again though I did phone a couple of times to thank him. That welcome home showed me in a profound way that the people who really counted in the world still cared about us and the years of our youth that we had given to this country.

              Regards...Rob
              Last edited by cwordw; 31 May 10, 06:51.

              Comment


              • #8
                Welcome Home

                http://indiancountrytodaymedianetwor...e-home-vietnam

                Native Warrior’s Efforts Lead Washington State to Observe Annual Welcome Home Vietnam Veterans Day
                Richard Walker
                March 26, 2013

                Many of them were 18 or 19 when they enlisted or were drafted. They were trained to fight in a far-off land, to stop communism from spreading into Southeast Asia.

                Meanwhile, all that is ugly about war – in this case, the Vietnam War – was broadcast into American living rooms for the first time. As the human and financial costs of the war grew, opinions collided – sometimes violently, in the U.S. capital, on college campuses and on city streets.

                When U.S. military personnel came home, many with injuries and memories that would still haunt them decades later, there was no welcome.

                “They were not treated like heroes as those who returned from Korea and World War II,” said Washington State Rep. Norm Johnson (R-Toppenish). “Instead, they were portrayed as baby killers, warmongers and other things.… That had a traumatic effect on these soldiers that is still painful to these days as many of them refuse to talk about their experiences.”

                Now, thirty eight years after the fall of Saigon and the end of the war, Washington state’s Vietnam War veterans will finally be welcomed home.

                State House Bill 1319 establishes March 30 of every year as “Welcome Home Vietnam Veterans Day” in Washington state. The bill, introduced by Johnson and co-sponsored by 38 state House members, was unanimously approved by the House on February 20. On March 25, the state Senate also unanimously passed the measure, sending it to Governor Jay Inslee for his signature.

                March 30 would not be a public holiday, but rather a day of public remembrance. However, all public buildings and schools would be required to fly the POW/MIA flag; that flag is also flown on Armed Forces Day, Memorial Day, Flag Day, Independence Day, National Korean War Veterans Armistice Day, National POW/MIA Recognition Day and Veterans Day.

                The observance was proposed to Johnson by Gil Calac of the Yakama Warriors Association, a Native veterans organization with about 190 members who make sure that veterans are not forgotten. Calac, an Army veteran who served in Vietnam from 1969-70, spoke for the bill February 6 and March 14. His compelling testimony moved the Washington legislators to act quickly and affirmatively on this bill.

                At the March 14 hearing before the Senate Committee on Governmental Operations, Calac said Welcome Home Vietnam Veterans Day would help veterans “put away our guilt, the shame, the grief and despair,” and heal from the animosity veterans faced when they returned home.

                Calac told of one veteran who returned home from Vietnam and was discharged in Oakland, California. He was spit upon while wearing his uniform. Upset, he went into a bar, where he was spit upon again. Linda McNeely, who joined Calac at the hearing, told the committee a similar story of how her husband was spit upon at the airport when he returned home from the war.

                “The scars will always be there forever,” Calac said. “I know we can’t change the past, but we can help our Vietnam War veterans by opening the door and saying, ‘Welcome home.’”
                Gil Calac, Yakama Nation, a member of the Yakama Warriors
                Gil Calac, Yakama Nation, a member of the Yakama Warriors

                Calac served in the U.S. Army’s 25th Infantry, 165th Signal Company from 1969-70. He served 15 months in Vietnam. He received the Bronze Star, the fifth-highest combat decoration, but won’t speak about the circumstances that led to his receiving the medal.

                “Two years ago was the first time I ever talked about getting the Bronze Star,” he said. “I still haven’t taken it out of the case.”

                After returning home from Vietnam, he coped with alcohol and drug dependence. His first marriage ended in divorce; he said he almost lost his second marriage and his children as well. He’s now been sober for 28 years, which he credits to his Native religion, Washat, and traditional foods.

                Had Vietnam War veterans been welcomed home at the start, closure and healing could have taken place earlier, he said.
                “A classmate told me he just started getting treated for PTSD two years ago,” Calac said. “[The trauma] is ingrained in you. You hide it, but it sneaks up on you. It comes out.”

                State Rep. John McCoy (D-Tulalip) was a communications operator in the U.S. Air Force, stationed at Clark Air Force Base in the Philippines during the Tet Offensive. He remembers the stack of coffins at the morgue across the street from his work station. His wife, Jeannie, worked as a civilian in the records section of the base hospital, and remembers the injured soldiers on stretchers in the hospital hallways.

                “It was pretty hard on her,” McCoy said. “From the time we left the Philippines until 1994, she wouldn’t step into a hospital.”

                McCoy was the first co-sponsor of HB 1319. “It’s time,” McCoy said. “A lot of those Vietnam vets are still suffering. That piece of legislation is going to help them heal.”

                According to the National Archives, 58,220 Americans--1,047 from Washington state – are known to have died in the Vietnam War. The Library of Congress POW/MIA Databases & Documents website reports that as of November 2001, 1,948 Americans remain unaccounted for in Vietnam.

                “In the little town of Toppenish where I grew up and served on the city council and as mayor, 13 men from that community paid the ultimate sacrifice in the Vietnam War,” Rep. Johnson told the state Senate committee. “That’s a per capita death rate eight times that of the nation’s and 12 times that of the state. I also have a cousin who lies in the cemetery at Zillah who came home in a box from Vietnam.”

                In a speech he gave at the Vietnam Veterans Memorial Wall on Memorial Day 1993, Lt. Gen. Barry R. McCaffrey said the average infantryman in the Vietnam War saw about 240 days of combat in one year – 200 more days than an infantryman in the South Pacific during World War II – thanks to the mobility of the helicopter. One out of every 10 Americans who served in the Vietnam War was a casualty; an estimated 304,000 were wounded and, at the time of McCaffrey’s speech, 75,000 Vietnam War veterans were living with war-related disabilities.

                Heidi Audette, communications director for the Washington State Department of Veterans Affairs, told the committee Welcome Home Vietnam Veterans Day would help future generations understand the service and sacrifice Vietnam War veterans made on behalf of their state and country.

                “We’re also really hopeful that this will continue to encourage Vietnam and other veterans to come forward and seek out the benefits they so richly deserve from their service to our country,” Audette said. “There are so many Vietnam veterans that have yet to connect with the benefits that they earned because of their service, so we’re hopeful this will help in that way as well.”

                Calac said several attempts in the U.S. Congress to pass a national Welcome Home Vietnam Veterans Day have failed; Calac and others are now lobbying to have the observance adopted state by state. (In 2011 and 2012, President Obama signed an executive order proclaiming March 29 of those years as Vietnam Veterans Day.)

                The legislatures in several states, California and Texas among them, have established a Welcome Home Vietnam Veterans Day. Calac said he and others are going to lobby next in Idaho, Arizona and Nevada.

                Rep. Johnson has invited the Yakama Warriors to present the colors March 29 at the State Capitol, the day before the new observance. Calac is inviting other Vietnam War veterans to participate. Following a short ceremony, veterans and family members will gather at the Vietnam Veterans Memorial on the Statehouse grounds. There will be a pow wow drum ceremony and a circle of life will be formed by the religious leaders who are on hand. Calac is hoping to have pins and ribbons for all Vietnam Veterans to wear.

                For more information, contact Calac at 509-949-0914 or [email protected]. The Yakama Warriors Association website is YakamaWarriors.com and their Facebook page can be found by clicking here.

                The website for the Washington State Department of Veterans Affairs is Dva.wa.gov. If you are a vet or know a vet who needs assistance, contact the Washington State VA at 360-725-2200 or 800-562-0132.

                Read more at http://indiancountrytodaymedianetwor...e-home-vietnam
                "War is hell, but actual combat is a motherf#cker"
                - Col. David Hackworth

                Comment


                • #9
                  Well at least it's better than how we were all treated when we first came . Huh ?

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I received a Welcome Home from the ones who loved me. That was enough.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      You're welcome America. It was fun.

                      You can thank me anytime, I still remember what C-rations tase like.
                      Happy just to be alive

                      Americans will always do the right thing.
                      After they've tried everything else
                      Winston Churchill

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by exlrrp View Post
                        You're welcome America. It was fun.

                        You can thank me anytime, I still remember what C-rations tase like.
                        If you decided to show up at the mountain...I'd throw some new generation MREs at you. How about a little chicken cordon bleu, with garlic toast, a Ceaser side salad, and a Grande Moccha Latte? I was a first generation MRE guy myself. Dehydrated Beef Patty definitely rivaled your Ham and MFers.
                        There are no stupid questions,but there are alot of inquisitive idiots. -Hankwill

                        "A special breed of man will sacrifice everything for the security and freedom of so many unthankful others"
                        - Ron Piper

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by don744 View Post
                          If you decided to show up at the mountain...I'd throw some new generation MREs at you. How about a little chicken cordon bleu, with garlic toast, a Ceaser side salad, and a Grande Moccha Latte? I was a first generation MRE guy myself. Dehydrated Beef Patty definitely rivaled your Ham and MFers.
                          Because every grunt should be eating chicken cordon bleu. And let me guess---double lattes. Is there a Camo colored Combat Microwave to go with that?
                          I know I'm going to get stuff thrown at me but C's weren't all that bad, just monotonous. Here's the happy part: free cigarettes!! because your government wants you to be healthy!
                          if we do the SC thing this year bring some then. Ive never tasted them.

                          Last timne I ate C's I believe was on Kahoolawe in 1975. Anybody know where that is? Its an island west of Maui, south of Lanai that the Navy and AF used to use for bombing. Its forbidden to be there because of all the unexploded ordinance but back in the 70s you could fish off the waters on weekends. Me and some pals came in and anchiored off the west shore to do some spear fishing in an Islander 37. We went onshore in a dinghy. there was an old camp there probly from WWII days but people came out there since, you could tell by the all the C's and beer cans scsttered around. we picked up easily 2 cases worth of C's---someone opened up cases just for the B3 cookies and left the rest
                          Gave them draft dodgers a taste of a fighting man's breakfast. Taught em how to use a fighting mans can opener
                          Couple of jets came swooping in and we hatted up pronto. What can they do to idiots?
                          Ive also been to Niihau
                          Last edited by exlrrp; 02 Apr 13, 19:32.
                          Happy just to be alive

                          Americans will always do the right thing.
                          After they've tried everything else
                          Winston Churchill

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by exlrrp View Post
                            Because every grunt should be eating chicken cordon bleu. And let me guess---double lattes. Is there a Camo colored Combat Microwave to go with that?
                            I know I'm going to get stuff thrown at me but C's weren't all that bad, just monotonous. Here's the happy part: free cigarettes!! because your government wants you to be healthy!
                            if we do the SC thing this year bring some then. Ive never tasted them.

                            Last timne I ate C's I believe was on Kahoolawe in 1975. Anybody know where that is? Its an island west of Maui, south of Lanai that the Navy and AF used to use for bombing. Its forbidden to be there because of all the unexploded ordinance but back in the 70s you could fish off the waters on weekends. Me and some pals came in and anchiored off the west shore to do some spear fishing in an Islander 37. We went onshore in a dinghy. there was an old camp there probly from WWII days but people came out there since, you could tell by the all the C's and beer cans scsttered around. we picked up easily 2 cases worth of C's---someone opened up cases just for the B3 cookies and left the rest
                            Gave them draft dodgers a taste of a fighting man's breakfast. Taught em how to use a fighting mans can opener
                            Couple of jets came swooping in and we hatted up pronto. What can they do to idiots?
                            Ive also been to Niihau
                            John Wayne bars all gone no doubt....any PB and J?

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by exlrrp View Post
                              Because every grunt should be eating chicken cordon bleu. And let me guess---double lattes. Is there a Camo colored Combat Microwave to go with that?
                              I know I'm going to get stuff thrown at me but C's weren't all that bad, just monotonous. Here's the happy part: free cigarettes!! because your government wants you to be healthy!
                              if we do the SC thing this year bring some then. Ive never tasted them.

                              Last timne I ate C's I believe was on Kahoolawe in 1975. Anybody know where that is? Its an island west of Maui, south of Lanai that the Navy and AF used to use for bombing. Its forbidden to be there because of all the unexploded ordinance but back in the 70s you could fish off the waters on weekends. Me and some pals came in and anchiored off the west shore to do some spear fishing in an Islander 37. We went onshore in a dinghy. there was an old camp there probly from WWII days but people came out there since, you could tell by the all the C's and beer cans scsttered around. we picked up easily 2 cases worth of C's---someone opened up cases just for the B3 cookies and left the rest
                              Gave them draft dodgers a taste of a fighting man's breakfast. Taught em how to use a fighting mans can opener
                              Couple of jets came swooping in and we hatted up pronto. What can they do to idiots?
                              Ive also been to Niihau
                              Yo dude, the Navy did not stop using Kahoolawe for live fire until 1995. Special Forces also trained there. The jets that buzzed you were probably telling you just that - GTFO ! I was stationed in Hawaii from 1976 until 1986 and travelled extensively throughout the islands. There are place you don't go to though. Like the pot farms in the mountains of the Big Island or Maui. Another was Niihau. I remember when a Typhoon went through and the locals on Niihau would not let the Governor land his helicopter because he was not a native of the island. Pretty exclusionary place it is. As far as the topic, I did not mind the C-Rats except that as stated previously, it got boring. Your right about the free cigarettes ! We sure did live in a different time. I remember oncce in a while a "mobile canteen" would fly out to the LZ's. I think they realized it was futile to try to sell us smokes.

                              Comment

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