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Best Book from the Vietnam Era

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  • Best Book from the Vietnam Era

    There have been many good ones like Born on the Fourth of July, but my favorite is the one I read recently; They Marched Into Sunlight written by David Maraniss. The book contrasted two major events happening almost concurrently; the 1st Inf. Div. operations in the Long Nguyen Secret Zone and the Dow recruiting protest by students of Univ. of Wisconsin. The Long Nguyen Secret Zone incident was significant because two companies of the Black Lion Battalion walked into an ambush and sustained major casualties. Among the killed were LTC Terry Allen, Jr., son of the famous WWII general and the other man killed was Maj. Don Holleder, former All-American football player at Army who played under Red Blaik. This is a great read and I highly recommend it.

  • #2
    Re: Best Book from the Vietnam Era

    Originally posted by tadcar
    There have been many good ones like Born on the Fourth of July, but my favorite is the one I read recently; They Marched Into Sunlight written by David Maraniss. The book contrasted two major events happening almost concurrently; the 1st Inf. Div. operations in the Long Nguyen Secret Zone and the Dow recruiting protest by students of Univ. of Wisconsin. The Long Nguyen Secret Zone incident was significant because two companies of the Black Lion Battalion walked into an ambush and sustained major casualties. Among the killed were LTC Terry Allen, Jr., son of the famous WWII general and the other man killed was Maj. Don Holleder, former All-American football player at Army who played under Red Blaik. This is a great read and I highly recommend it.
    Whether I agree with everything in it or not. I think that "A Bright, Shining Lie" is a worthwhile book
    Mens Est Clavis Victoriae
    (The Mind Is The Key To Victory)

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    • #3
      I would have to say "The Rise and Fall of an American Army" by Shelby L. Stanton and "The Eleven Days of Christmas" by Marshall L. Michel III:sleep:
      B. FETT

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      • #4
        James Webb's Fields Of Fire, and Philip Caputo's A Rumor Of War.

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        • #5
          Any book by Keith William Nolan. His work is very detail oriented.

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          • #6
            'A Better War

            And

            We Were Soldiers
            abradley

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            • #7
              Whether I agree with everything in it or not. I think that "A Bright, Shining Lie" is a worthwhile book
              I'm with you on that one. John Paul Vann had many faults but he was a great soldier.

              What did you think of the movie?

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              • #8
                I always liked 'A Rumor of War' by Phil Caputo.


                Cheers


                :armed:
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                "I'm not expendable; I'm not stupid and I'm not going." - Kerr Avon, Blake's 7

                What didn't kill us; didn't make us smarter.

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                • #9
                  The Vietnam war has a whole ton of stuff written on it, much of which is quite worthless. :nonono:
                  Anyway, here is my short list of recommended reading.
                  I didn't list anything others have noted but I liked all of them.

                  Anything by Shelby Stanton, but especially Rise and Fall of an American Army

                  Anything by SLA Marshall. His books - Ambush, Bird, Battles in the Monsoon, West to Cambodia etc were about the only books written on military aspects during the war, as everybody else was busy either attacking or defending our presence there. They are all excellent, and delightful to read.

                  Summons of the Trumpet by Dave Palmer

                  America in Vietnam by Gunther Lewi

                  Dirty Little Secrets of the Vietnam War by Dunnigan and Nofi. Gossipy, superficial, but fun and informational

                  Off Yankee Station for Navy fans and Thud Ridge for Air Force lovers.

                  I could go on and on, but this is a start.

                  Mike Duffy

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                  • #10
                    There's a book, I think it's called A Teacher at War, that is the autobiography of an elementary school teacher that is drafted and goes to Nam. It tells all of his adventures from his arrival thru his departure.
                    Barcsi János ispán vezérőrnagy
                    Time Magazine's Person of the Year for 2003 & 2006


                    "Never pet a burning dog."

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                    • #11
                      Re: Re: Best Book from the Vietnam Era

                      Originally posted by hogdriver
                      Whether I agree with everything in it or not. I think that "A Bright, Shining Lie" is a worthwhile book
                      Yeah, great book!

                      Have you ever read ''Tattoo'' by Earl Thomson? It is a novel but the character is very like John Paul Vann.
                      http://www.irelandinhistory.blogspot.ie/

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                      • #12
                        Sand in the Wind
                        by Robert Roth

                        My all time favorite Vietnam War book.

                        Quote from Amazon site:
                        My brother and I both read this book when we were teenagers about eight or nine years ago. It made a big impression on both of us, we would both rate it as one of the best books we've read. It even moved me to write a poem about it! Rarely do you find a book that arouses such a lot of strong emotions - there are some very humorous moments as well as the horrific ones. You do get the impression that this is a very authentic account and you really feel like you know the characters. I've been searching for this book for a while and couldn't even find a reference to it in the U.K. until I went on the Internet. I really can't believe that a book of this calibre and surely one of the best accounts of war written is now out of print and so hard to find, and it is surprising no-one ever made a film of it either. I'd love to know what Robert Roth is doing now and if he's ever going to write another book. This should be a classic, I think there should be a campaign to get it back in print and make more people aware of it. A lot of people know about books like "Chickenhawk" but "Sand In The Wind" is a book with wider appeal and deserves much much more recognition. I can't wait to read it again!

                        One of the great War novels IMHO...anyone else read it?
                        http://www.irelandinhistory.blogspot.ie/

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                        • #13
                          The Thirteenth Valley by John DelVeccio is a great book.
                          "Common sense is the collection of prejudices acquired by age eighteen." - Albert Einstein

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                          • #14
                            The Greatest Book I Would Have To Say Is By One Of My Idles...Steel My Soldiers Hearts...By The One And Only DAVID HACKWORTH!!! Gentelemen This Book Is The Most Amazing Vietnam War Book I Personally Have Ever Read...What An Amazing Book!!! If You Havent Read It You Have Never Read A Greater War Book!
                            "Send Me"

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                            • #15
                              I agree with most of the selections (at least the ones I've read!). I like Steel My Soldiers' Hearts, but Hackworth does tend to get political, even in the middle of the action. The factual descriptions are excellent and really let you in the battle and his tactical analysis is great, but when he starts talking about the war in general I normally skip ahead.
                              "Anything worth fighting for is worth fighting dirty for"
                              "The journey of a thousand miles begins with one step, and a lot of bitching"

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