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  • Tet offensive

    In light of the recent pole i was wondering what happened in the Tet offensive. I'm currently reading "Battle for HUE Tet 1968" by Keith William Nolan. From what I've read it sounds like the Tet offensive was one big assualt by the NVA and Vietcong on South Vietnam.

    My book dosen't go into a lot of detail on the offensive it just focuses on the battle for Hue. I may be getting the wrong picture on it, so could someone explain the Tet offensive.

    By the way the books a pretty good read for house to house city fighting in Vietnam. The Mariens really rock in it.

  • #2
    Re: Tet offensive

    Originally posted by theotherguyjt
    In light of the recent pole i was wondering what happened in the Tet offensive. I'm currently reading "Battle for HUE Tet 1968" by Keith William Nolan. From what I've read it sounds like the Tet offensive was one big assualt by the NVA and Vietcong on South Vietnam.

    My book dosen't go into a lot of detail on the offensive it just focuses on the battle for Hue. I may be getting the wrong picture on it, so could someone explain the Tet offensive.

    By the way the books a pretty good read for house to house city fighting in Vietnam. The Mariens really rock in it.
    In a nutshell; the NVA and Viet Cong acheived a tactical surprise on the south and the US. One the surprise wore off; the NVA/Viet Cong got their arse handed to them.

    However, the media exposure of the fighting in Saigon was shown on American TV; the public's perception was of a defeat. It kicked the war protest into high gear. So for the United States and South Vietnam it was a major tactical victory; but a strategic defeat.

    Cheers!


    Eagles may fly; but weasels aren't sucked into jet engines!

    "I'm not expendable; I'm not stupid and I'm not going." - Kerr Avon, Blake's 7

    What didn't kill us; didn't make us smarter.

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    • #3
      Thanks for the infor, really cleared things up for me.:thumb:

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      • #4
        Originally posted by theotherguyjt
        Thanks for the infor, really cleared things up for me.:thumb:

        You're welcome. Glad to be of help.

        Cheers!



        Eagles may fly; but weasels aren't sucked into jet engines!

        "I'm not expendable; I'm not stupid and I'm not going." - Kerr Avon, Blake's 7

        What didn't kill us; didn't make us smarter.

        Comment


        • #5
          Tet was a sorry example of how the press can twist facts, innuendo, gossip and suppositions into what ever fantasy they choose to create. As noted by RStory, initial surprise was achieved by the NVA/VC, but once US forces recovered and counterattcked, the Viet forces were smashed and demoralized - in fact, NVA leaders of Tet admitted years later that experienced NVA units were broken, driven into a rout, and that losses were horrifying, even by their standards. Similar such reporters are now engaging in the same sort of fantasy reporting in Iraq. If it isn't rampant terrorism; IEDs, car bombs and suicide bombers (who all seem to be the fault of the troops); slow pace of reconstruction, or a laundry list of other complaints, they are complaining about something. It is as if we are stuck in a time warp. I wouldn't be surprised is soem reporter or other sliiped and said Tet, rather than Fallujah, Najaf or Mosul. The sad fact is that either they have blinded themselves to the truth or have been indoctrinated by their supremos. Though impractical, the best way to know what is happening is to be there.
          Mens Est Clavis Victoriae
          (The Mind Is The Key To Victory)

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          • #6
            Originally posted by hogdriver
            Tet was a sorry example of how the press can twist facts, innuendo, gossip and suppositions into what ever fantasy they choose to create. As noted by RStory, initial surprise was achieved by the NVA/VC, but once US forces recovered and counterattcked, the Viet forces were smashed and demoralized - in fact, NVA leaders of Tet admitted years later that experienced NVA units were broken, driven into a rout, and that losses were horrifying, even by their standards. Similar such reporters are now engaging in the same sort of fantasy reporting in Iraq. If it isn't rampant terrorism; IEDs, car bombs and suicide bombers (who all seem to be the fault of the troops); slow pace of reconstruction, or a laundry list of other complaints, they are complaining about something. It is as if we are stuck in a time warp. I wouldn't be surprised is soem reporter or other sliiped and said Tet, rather than Fallujah, Najaf or Mosul. The sad fact is that either they have blinded themselves to the truth or have been indoctrinated by their supremos. Though impractical, the best way to know what is happening is to be there.
            Just to reiterate what Hog said, the NVA never operated again in the numbers it had for Tet. It basically became a guerilla force. However this should not imply their sacrifice was for naught. The political damage was done to the US. The battle of the US homefront was lost. The American people lost their taste for war and the downward spiral that led to the US leaving Vietnam had begun.
            Lance W.

            Peace through superior firepower.

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            • #7
              Yes, and unfortunatly the press never recovered the belief that we can win a war.
              Politics is the art of looking for trouble, finding it whether it exists or not, diagnosing it incorrectly and applying the wrong remedy. -- Ernest Benn

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              • #8
                Sorry to tell you guys...but no the NVA did not become a geurilla force and they did attack in hug numbers once more before the wars end. The NVA still fought conventional tactics after
                TET. Maybe not on such a large scale but I am positive they never turned to a geurilla force. And in the case you said no major offensive. The NVA launched even by American standards a ENORMOUS offensive in 1972 known as the Easter Offensive. The ARVN barely hung on and lost most of Northern South Vietnam but regained lost land due to American air support. But anyway these are the real facts.
                "Send Me"

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                • #9
                  It has been mentioned about the two forces, (NVA/VC). The guerilla's in the south were known as the Viet Cong, they lived (some for years) and worked in South Vietnam by day and fought at night. They were decimated by the Tet offensive and didn't become an effective force again. The NVA (North Vietnamese Army) was the regular army of North Vietnam. Units were rebuilt but they never tried another offensive until the U.S. had pulled most of their combat troops out.
                  "War is God's way of teaching Americans geography."
                  - Ambrose Bierce

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                  • #10
                    name change

                    Towards the end of the war the Viet Cong officially changed their name from Viet Cong to NLF.
                    "Send Me"

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