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What rounds were fired and when?

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  • #16
    Originally posted by Salinator View Post
    After doing some research, it turns out that the .223 Remington had the US OSD designation of .556 M193 Ball.
    5.56mm.
    Any man can hold his place when the bands play and women throw flowers; it is when the enemy presses close and metal shears through the ranks that one can acertain which are soldiers, and which are not.

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    • #17
      There is a slight pressure differentiation and leade (barrel throat) difference between the .223 and 5.56mm but it only comes into play when using heavy/long for caliber bullets (69gr +). Basically, you can shoot .223 in 5.56 but not the opposite. Many modern .308 loads shouldn't be used in M14's due to the pressure curve being different than the historical norm and it not playing nicely with the op rod and piston. As long as you use the old standard powders (4895 etc.), you will be fine.

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      • #18
        The whole point being that the .556 fired in Vietnam was the .223 Remington. The .556 that everyone is thinking about today is the .556 NATO which came around 1980 because NATO wanted an effective range of 400 yards while the war in Vietnam only called for 300 yards.
        Flag: USA / Location: West Coast

        Prayers.

        BoRG

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        • #19
          Originally posted by Salinator View Post
          The whole point being that the .556 fired in Vietnam was the .223 Remington. The .556 that everyone is thinking about today is the .556 NATO which came around 1980 because NATO wanted an effective range of 400 yards while the war in Vietnam only called for 300 yards.
          The only thing different about the NATO round is that it uses the 62gr bullet. The case is the same for US/NATO round. Both .223 and 5.56mm NATO ammunition is available with grain weights of 50-77. Handloaders can go both higher (80+) or lower (-50).
          FYI--its 5.56mm, not .556.

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