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  • Post Traumatic Stress Disorder

    The most recent VFW magazine has an article noting the numbers of VN Vets seeking counseling has risen 59% since 9/11. The article goes on to suggest some of the reasons why this is so.

    My read on it is that many of the Vets are experiencing PTSD because they are realizing that the Iraqi business is beginning to turn into the political football that Viet Nam did, with the same sorry-assed ending.

    What say you?

    GG
    "The will of a section rooted in self interest, should not outweigh the vital interests of a whole people." -Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain-

    "Fanatics of any sort are dangerous." -GG-

  • #2
    i agree with you mate it was always politics from the start for iraq though IMO..
    owner of the yahoo group for WW1 ,WW2 and Modern TO&Es
    (Tables of organisation & equipment or Unit of action )

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Grognard Gunny View Post
      The most recent VFW magazine has an article noting the numbers of VN Vets seeking counseling has risen 59% since 9/11. The article goes on to suggest some of the reasons why this is so.

      My read on it is that many of the Vets are experiencing PTSD because they are realizing that the Iraqi business is beginning to turn into the political football that Viet Nam did, with the same sorry-assed ending.

      What say you?

      GG
      I have been told by the VA I have PTSD. From the information I have, it had nothing to do with 9/11. Some of the things in my life lead to the decision of PTSD. Not being able to have a stable relationship, drinking too much, being a hermit, the list goes on and on. That is not something that started after 9/11. I am still not convinced I have it, but they say I do. I am not going through counseling and at this point have no plans to. Your read may be correct of alot of it, but I tend to lean towards the full understanding of what it is and the VA going out of their way to ask questions about it. Looking back, I see patterns in my life that leads to the conclusion that I have it.

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      • #4
        The smart ass civilian doc at MEPS suggested that I seek counseling for undiagnosed PTSD when I was 18: dead father, lots of (suspected) youth violence, etc, etc, etc. I've heard the same thing several times since. Based on some of the individuals I've known over the years, I've never written off PTSD, but by the same token, I've seen PTSD used as a catch-all for all kinds of "trauma," regardless of its minor degree. I've known more than a few, civilians and service people alike, try to game the system for a PTSD diagnosis code. I'm sorry, but I fail to see how getting yelled at by your boss in a civilian setting qualifies as PTSD. As long as those shennanigans continue, folks with real PTSD will suffer the incredulity of their neighbors, and worse, they will cruelly question their own intestinal fortitude. Perhaps a better diagnostic definition of PTSD is in order so that the goldbricks can be weeded out of the patch, and the guys who really need treatment can get it without jumping through hoops, or doubting their own self-worth.
        I was married for two ******* years! Hell would be like Club Med! - Sam Kinison

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        • #5
          While I was in the VA applying for benefits due to an illness caused by Agent Orange I did ask about PTSD. Because I do not have a CIB or a Purple Heart they are not in the least bit interested in assisting me with any benefits on PTSD. I do know a guy in my company in 'Nam who did qualify for PTSD benefits but it took him about 10 years because our work is still classified as Top Secret and none of it could be revealed to the VA.

          Based upon the self assessment questions you take there is little doubt that I do have PTSD. I have noticed that after 9/11 it has taken on a greater amount of my life than before. I think it has to do with knowing that what is going on in the mid-east now is much like we experienced decades back. Hearing about it on a daily basis and knowing it is real I think keeps those memories in the forefront instead of sleeping in the back.

          I do take professional counseling, have for several years, but it is paid for by my private medical insurance.
          "If you are right, then you are right even if everyone says you are wrong. If you are wrong then you are wrong even if everyone says you are right." William Penn.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Grognard Gunny View Post
            The most recent VFW magazine has an article noting the numbers of VN Vets seeking counseling has risen 59% since 9/11. The article goes on to suggest some of the reasons why this is so.
            Well, I'm not a member so I don't get the mag, but I suspect a part of it is because of the cases from Iraq. Unlike during the VN war, folks in the medical field are beginning to look for signs of PTSD rather than just the physical signs of combat.

            What did the mag come up with as an explanation?
            Barcsi János ispán vezérőrnagy
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            • #7
              Originally posted by Grognard Gunny View Post
              The most recent VFW magazine has an article noting the numbers of VN Vets seeking counseling has risen 59% since 9/11. The article goes on to suggest some of the reasons why this is so.

              My read on it is that many of the Vets are experiencing PTSD because they are realizing that the Iraqi business is beginning to turn into the political football that Viet Nam did, with the same sorry-assed ending.

              What say you?

              GG
              Certainly I think there is some of this for sure. But I also think some of this is going to be like kids with ADD. It is the trend to go looking for it, so of course they are going to find more of it. I believe there is a PTSD mindset in our culture now. The minute anything happens they start diagnosing this everywhere. Certainly some of it is valid, but there is too much of a tendency to get fashionable about these things. You know, sometimes the kid is just being a kid.

              If Trung Si shows up I think he will have more to offer on this subject that might be useful. He has worked with the VA in this area.

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              • #8
                hmmm PTSD??

                Things that have bothered me for the past 40 yrs have been chopper's flying overhead. Instantly puts me back in the Jungle.

                Fourth of July and New Year's celebrations. Not to happy about these times of year because of the noises and sometimes the smell created by the explosive devices.

                Rocks hitting my windshield and gun shots heard off in the distance.

                I live in Idaho. Have never gotten used to hunters with their weapons on racks in back of their pick-up trucks pointing at me. Makes my palms sweat.

                Oh yeah - almost forgot - whenever I go into a movie or restaurant, or other crowded areas I'm always alert as to the best way out of the situation. Think this is more from growing up in Los Angels tho - hehe!

                Other than the above stuff - I'M GREAT!

                KEN
                DO NO HARM
                Last edited by KEN JENSEN; 30 Oct 07, 14:54.
                1st ID, 1/28th '67/'68 Phouc Vinh & Quan Loi
                Skirmishes Bu Dop Dec-67, An My, Thu Duc Feb-68
                Plt. Ldr - CIB, Purple Hearts, Silver Star
                What we write can be considered to be a reflection of our SOUL providing others to know our CHARACTER.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Miss.Saigon View Post
                  Certainly I think there is some of this for sure. But I also think some of this is going to be like kids with ADD. It is the trend to go looking for it, so of course they are going to find more of it. I believe there is a PTSD mindset in our culture now. The minute anything happens they start diagnosing this everywhere. Certainly some of it is valid, but there is too much of a tendency to get fashionable about these things. You know, sometimes the kid is just being a kid.

                  If Trung Si shows up I think he will have more to offer on this subject that might be useful. He has worked with the VA in this area.
                  I couldn't agree more, but in some ways it makes thing harder for people who actually should qualify. A friend of mine's father came back from WWII an absolute drunk, where wasn't known to over indulge before. Jack thought lowly of his father in his younger years, but now figures he just couldn't deal with the things he saw or did. His father never once spoke of the war.

                  It should be noted that I don't what qualifies one for PTSD, but I do feel bad for any vet that is so adversely affected by a war that they have trouble re-entering society.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Biscuit View Post
                    I couldn't agree more, but in some ways it makes thing harder for people who actually should qualify. A friend of mine's father came back from WWII an absolute drunk, where wasn't known to over indulge before. Jack thought lowly of his father in his younger years, but now figures he just couldn't deal with the things he saw or did. His father never once spoke of the war.

                    It should be noted that I don't what qualifies one for PTSD, but I do feel bad for any vet that is so adversely affected by a war that they have trouble re-entering society.
                    Not everyone that has PTSD has trouble re-entering society. I have researched it since the VA told me I have it. I have been suffering from it if you will, since I came back from VN. It never entered my mind that is what it is. I have worked all my life and never gotten an unemployment check. I currently run a Peace officers academy along with alot of other duties for the Nevada Department of Corrections. I am able to function normally. However, the things away from work point to PTSD. Without going to much into my personal life I will leave it at that.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by medivac View Post
                      Not everyone that has PTSD has trouble re-entering society. I have researched it since the VA told me I have it. I have been suffering from it if you will, since I came back from VN. It never entered my mind that is what it is. I have worked all my life and never gotten an unemployment check. I currently run a Peace officers academy along with alot of other duties for the Nevada Department of Corrections. I am able to function normally. However, the things away from work point to PTSD. Without going to much into my personal life I will leave it at that.
                      Fair enough, sorry about that one. I didn't mean everyone, but someone like my friend's dad who comes back a drunk obviously is enjoying as much of society and life as they should and I hate that for them.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Biscuit View Post
                        Fair enough, sorry about that one. I didn't mean everyone, but someone like my friend's dad who comes back a drunk obviously is enjoying as much of society and life as they should and I hate that for them.
                        You have no reason to appologize, I just wanted to point out to everyone that just because someone has PTSD they are not all basket cases

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by medivac View Post
                          You have no reason to appologize, I just wanted to point out to everyone that just because someone has PTSD they are not all basket cases
                          I don't believe anyone here ever thought that!! The crowd that believes all that Psycho veteran nonsense doesn't generally have the intellect to show up in a place like this.

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                          • #14
                            Disregard, I am having connection and thus double posting issues!
                            Last edited by Biscuit; 30 Oct 07, 17:09.

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                            • #15
                              PTSD can be brought on by any event that is traumatizing to us. For those who watch the news today and were in Nam, the closeness in events can trigger it. The thought of guerrilla war, the scenes of IED's and so forth bring it home to us and whether we realize it or not, we suffering the same stressful feelings. When I got out of the army, I joined Fire/Rescue. I have seen men who have had a past memory triggered by similar events and they shut down.
                              9/11 was immensely stressful because our focus was 'We're under attack'. It takes us back to those familiar feelings of the past.
                              I am a firm believer in PTSD and it irritates the living hell out me when people try to say it doesn't exist.
                              "War is hell, but actual combat is a motherf#cker"
                              - Col. David Hackworth

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