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  • Sorry To Vets On The Forum

    I'm one of the very few that wasn't even born when the vietnam conflict ended in 75. But ever since i can remember ive had a great interest and appreciation for the men and women who served in vietnam. I think too often people my age make ignorant comments without really knowing the facts. This is only my 3rd day on acg. But that short time as opened my eyes to what it really must of been like over there. I want to appologize to any Vets i may offend with some of my threads. It's unintentional. Everyday i learn something new and hope that i can continue to share my thoughts and opinions without ofending or pissing off any vets that not only talks the talk, but also walked the walk in vietnam. God bless you vets. We all owe you a big thank you.

  • #2
    You're an honorable man for saying that. We Vietnam Vets, in the past several years, I believe are getting the recognition we deserve. We realize we've been stereotyped. Unless people have been in any war zone it's difficult to understand.

    We need to support our returning troops from Iraq/Afghanistan, that's for sure.

    Comment


    • #3
      bpmoore - You are certainly welcomed here. It is nice to see your interest in the conflict, your willingness to listen and to share what you have learned. Variety of ages, knowledge, military service or not, all add to the depth of our understanding of how this war affected ALL Americans and Vietnamese then and right on down to today.
      I believe you will find most vets willing to discuss matters openly. Your honesty and respect are appreciated. You will at times, run into one who want to question or challenge you on every little thing. Ignore them.

      "War is hell, but actual combat is a motherf#cker"
      - Col. David Hackworth

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by jim416 View Post
        You're an honorable man for saying that. We Vietnam Vets, in the past several years, I believe are getting the recognition we deserve. We realize we've been stereotyped. Unless people have been in any war zone it's difficult to understand.

        We need to support our returning troops from Iraq/Afghanistan, that's for sure.
        Hey jim thanks your comments. Where can i get your book? I would love to read it.

        Comment


        • #5
          Yeah Jim, where can I get the book used Starving student here. (talk about a myth. Most students are far from impoverished. The bars cost money too )

          When I get back home I will check the amazon marketplace.

          Comment


          • #6
            bp moore. Obviously I'm not American and my nation did not even officially get involved in the vietnam war but I am no less interested plus I was born in '76! My first post on ACG was about vietnam and the vets (who I personally feel are only really now getting the credit they deserve for their efforts) here have been nothing but welcoming inciteful, interesting and willing to give their time and teach people like me some of their experiences and knowledge. For a history buff like me (as we all are) its been nothing but fascinating.
            Last edited by copenhagen; 11 Oct 07, 15:58.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by bpmoore24 View Post
              Hey jim thanks your comments. Where can i get your book? I would love to read it.
              Amazon and Publish America right now. It was re-released just over a week ago and it will take time to hit Barnes and Noble, etc. I have 75 copies coming here to the house (because of book signings, etc.) so I can give you a heads up then.

              No used copies yet although I might offer a secret discount.

              Here are some reviews.
              __________________________________________________ __________

               One of the best books about Vietnam I have read! , April 18, 2007
              Reviewer: Davey Dunn - See all my reviews

              One of the best books about Vietnam I have read! It reminds me of a kinder gentler version of Caputo's Rumor of War. It has the feel of what it was like for an average soldier to be there without the blood and vulgarity of Caputo. If you like blood and guts memoirs then look elsewhere but if you are looking for a coming of age story about a young man who goes off to War, then you will love The Ghosts of Vietnam.
              __________________________________________________ ______________

              The Ghosts Of Vietnam, January 2, 2007
              Reviewer: E. Rich (Corbin, KY USA) - See all my reviews


              This is an excellent book, a poignant, sometimes funny, realistic, and down to earth honest look at growing up in rural America, and going to war.

              Jim gives us a rare look at the Vietnam war from a different point of view, with insights that will engage a broad spectrum of readers, especially those of us who were there!

              Thanks Jim for the memories!
              __________________________________________________ _____________
              highly reccomended !!, January 1, 2007
              Reviewer: Andrew Lubin "author of Charlie Battery; A Marine Artillery Unit in Iraq" (Bucks County, Pa) - See all my reviews


              First-time author Jim Stewart has written a raw and powerful memoir of his years in Vietnam and his life. Unlike many of the current Vietnam-era memoirs, Stewart's uncommonly poignant and well-written story details his four years in the `Nam without the blood, gore, or trauma so popular today. This is the story of a young man's coming of age and maturing as a human being while simultaneously dealing with a war, a callous family `back in the world', and his first real love and long-term relationship.

              Stewart takes us back to his childhood, where he grew up in a poor but loving household, and how he tried re-create it with his young Vietnamese girlfriend, Mai. In the midst of the Tet Offensive and the later collapse of the country, Stewart and Mai strive for normalcy in the insanity of Vietnam towards the end of the war. His relaxed yet detailed writing style allows the reader to begin to understand what it was like to live and work in Saigon, both for a Vietnamese and an American; even such insignificant events as shopping and taking a taxi turn must be pre-planned, and Stewart draws the reader directly into the traffic with him.

              While the author was an MP instead of an infantryman and therefore believes himself possibly fortunate not seen any actual combat, his book is not really about the fighting in Vietnam; it's a story of the author, his dad, Per, Mai, and Phuong - and it's a story well worth reading. Highly recommended !!
              __________________________________________________ _____________
              A Remarkable Memoir of MPs in Action, August 3, 2006
              Reviewer: Jamie Dodson "Jamie Dodson" (Huntsville, Alabama, United States) - See all my reviews


              Jim Stewart's remarkable memoir "The Ghost of Viet Nam" is a gut wrenching true story about a boy's rights-of-passage to manhood. Stewart's descriptions of life and love in Viet Nam breathe life into the story of Military Police action across the war torn country. The excellent narrative rings with truth and humor as Stewart relays his four years in country and the devastating effect on his personal life. I recommend "The Ghost of Viet Nam" as a well written and authoritative. It provides a unique perspective on the effects of a long forgotten war.
              __________________________________________________ _______________
              A tremendous Memoir, June 21, 2006
              Reviewer: Gary (NY) - See all my reviews

              As an English teacher, I am constantly searching for reading for my students which will leave an impact on their lives. Mr. Stewart's memoir is such a novel. His raw, insightful account of his time in Vietnam is a story that is often unheard. We are commonly given images of war without the human story. Jim Stewart goes beyond that and discusses his "growing up" as an MP soldier in Vietnam. He brings the human side and not only gives a picture of an American soldier, but also of a citizen of Vietnam.

              His memoir begins with a touching section about his childhood and his relationship with his Father. The sections about his time in Vietnam are vividly written as the reader can see the landscape he describes and gets a sense of the tension Jim faced. The reader also sees a conflicted man as he must choose between his home and a love in Vietnam. These are the unknown stories that we Americans must read to truly appreciate the effort of all veterans. This was a truly touching piece of literature.
              __________________________________________________ _____________
              A Touching Memoir by a Vietnam Veteran MP, June 5, 2006
              Reviewer: W. H. McDonald Jr. "The American Author Association / Author of: A Spiritual Warrior's Journey" - See all my reviews


              In The Ghosts of Vietnam, author Jim Stewart reminisces back on his life, which included 4 years in-country. It is not your normal combat action story but actually a warm and at times tender loving story of a young man seeking to find himself during the war and the years afterwards. It is about a journey and not just a diary of where he has been and what he has done. You get inside his heart, as well as his head.

              There is a touching scene from his experience as an MP in the Saigon area when he witnesses a little girl on a bike get killed by a truck. He never forgot that little girl, nor the image of her lying on the ground with half her skull missing. It haunts him in the background of his heart; and in a strange twist of fate, that tragic scene gets played out again later in life when he seeks to find his own daughter whom he left behind in Vietnam.

              This book is both funny and sad. It is at times, spiritual as well as being very worldly but it is always entertaining. It reads very easily and for people who do not like typical war books, this is the one to read. This is not one of those blatant "I am a hero" with blood and gore stories. This book shows a different side of the war--the kind where crime, black markets and life behind the battle lines in Saigon and the cities are the focus. It is also about love and the loss of love.

              This is a story of a man who never really got to enjoy being a father to his daughter; a man who lost his youth many years ago in a far-a-way place that still dreams inside him at night. Yes, there are still ghosts of Vietnam within him but he is finally at peace.

              OUTSTANDING BOOK! TOP RATING FROM THE MWSA!

              2005 Distinguished Honor Award!
              __________________________________________________ _______________
              Heart wrenching tale, April 29, 2006
              Reviewer: Ex-MP Waynelen (Seattle, WA USA) - See all my reviews

              There is a bigger story in "The Ghosts of Vietnam." Yes, it is about the Military Police and their role in the Vietnam War but this heart-wrenching tale is also about finding love for the first time in a country that is being torn apart. Tenderness and caring is rare during wartime conditions, especially when it is a true story like this one. Jim Stewart, writing from his heart, lets the chips fall where they may and shoulders his responsibility for the outcome. If you haven't been in the military, or didn't serve in Vietnam, you will be surprised at his description of life in Saigon as a war raged throughout the countryside. This book could only have been written by someone who saw it firsthand. Well done, Jim.
              __________________________________________________ _____________
              Haunting and Inspiring, March 27, 2006
              Reviewer: Diana J. Dell (Boston, MA) - See all my reviews

              Jim Stewart has written a powerful and touching memoir, a spiritual and heart-warming portrayal of a man lost by his memories of the woman and child he left behind in the Vietnam War. Years later he writes, "When we left Vietnam we all took our own pieces of this country and carried our own individual experiences with us. Some reluctantly, chased in the dark by nightmares, others gladly remembering even the toughest of times as the best of times. There are ghosts that chase us."

              Compelling and engaging, Stewart's poignant story of love, loss and redemption is filled with memorable characters and emotional (as well as humorous) vignettes. Once you start "The Ghosts of Vietnam," you won't be able to put it down; and after you've read this haunting and inspiring book, you will not be able to get it out of your mind.

              Sincerely, Diana J. Dell, author, "A Saigon Party: And Other Vietnam War Short Stories" and "Memories Are Like Clouds."
              __________________________________________________ ______________
               "The Ghosts of Vietnam": In my Book: ( A Classic), February 7, 2006
              Reviewer: J. Pope - See all my reviews

              Jim: "The Ghosts of Vietnam" arrived yesterday afternoon. I sat down in my easy chair and began to read. After reaching the half-way mark, I stopped, had a bowl of chili, ran some quick errands, rushed back to my seat and finished "your story" last night. You did a fine job of writing and putting your memoirs in print. It is great from the opening page until the very end.
              "The Ghosts of Vietnam is a classic; it revived many of my fond memories (both good and bad) from my childhood in West Texas, to sailing under the Golden Gate Bridge (1965) on our way to parts unknown, and the years in between and since. Only a soldier who had been there could tell it like you have.
              Respectfully,
              Jim

              __________________________________________________ _________
              Potato Tacos, February 3, 2006
              Reviewer: Potato Tacos "Chris" (Sacramento, CA) - See all my reviews

              I read Jim's book because I worked with Jim as a Police Officer for several years while he was going through the search for his child. I saw the passion and love he had for his Vietnam family and the determination he had for finding out the truths of what had become of what he left behind. The book brought back alot of that for me. Jim Stewart was a good soldier, a good cop, a good friend, and a good writer but he is most importantly a great family man who made some tough choices in his life that he will second guess, I imagine, for his lifetime. Thank God he has the wife and family he has that stand by him. His book made me hold my kids tight and inspired me to be a better father. Thanks Jim, can't wait for the next one!
              __________________________________________________ ___________
              GRABBING MY ATTENTION & MY HEART, February 3, 2006
              Reviewer: Ernest J. Ayala "Vietnam Dog Handler" (Covina, CA) - See all my reviews


              Jim Stewart is a very lucky man to have lived through four years of Vietnam without shooting his weapon. This story is true because I lived it too. We were called in within months of each other and I was an MP in Vietnam. I admire him because I never escorted convoys. I always thought those guys had to be suicidal. This is a book that is easy on the eyes and one chapter easily goes on to the next because it becomes an addiction. The story slowly wraps around you until it has you captive. As a hardened Vietnam veteran MP, the story had me bawling like a baby and just when it squeezed the last ounce of guts from my wretched body it eased up and assured me everything was going to be allright. My wife also read it and couldn't put it down. I want the movie rights.
              __________________________________________________ ____________
              The Ghosts of Vietnam a good read, October 19, 2005
              Reviewer: Doug Water "Doug" (Camdenton,) - See all my reviews

              This is not a story of combat, blood and guts or self proclaimed heros. This is a book about a young man's journey through Viet Nam. It will make you laugh. It will take you to the brink of tears. If you want to get inside the head of a man that's been there. Here is your book. It's a story about a man's love of country, fellow soldiers and a Vietnamese girl and of tragedy. As a Viet Nam vet I can relate to this book as I'm sure many other vets can. It's a good read and a good addition to any library.
              Good Memoir, September 24, 2005

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by bpmoore24 View Post
                I'm one of the very few that wasn't even born when the vietnam conflict ended in 75. But ever since i can remember ive had a great interest and appreciation for the men and women who served in vietnam. I think too often people my age make ignorant comments without really knowing the facts. This is only my 3rd day on acg. But that short time as opened my eyes to what it really must of been like over there. I want to appologize to any Vets i may offend with some of my threads. It's unintentional. Everyday i learn something new and hope that i can continue to share my thoughts and opinions without ofending or pissing off any vets that not only talks the talk, but also walked the walk in vietnam. God bless you vets. We all owe you a big thank you.
                They should submit this as a good example of how to enter a forum community.
                Life is change. Built models for decades.
                Not sure anyone here actually knows the real me.
                I didn't for a long time either.

                Comment


                • #9
                  bpmoore:

                  Welcome aboard, mate. I think you will find some kindred souls here.

                  GG
                  "The will of a section rooted in self interest, should not outweigh the vital interests of a whole people." -Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain-

                  "Fanatics of any sort are dangerous." -GG-

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I'm 66, son. I learn new **** about the war everyday. A day without a couple "Well I'll be danmed, I didn't know that." is like a day without sunshine.
                    "I am your friend...I have chocolate."
                    Cpl.Courcey, GO TELL THE SPARTANS.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      bp, Thanks and welcome.
                      I find the times interesting. Seems more people have said something to me, thanked me or we've had discussions about the Vietnam War, more in the last couple of years than ever. If they see my bumper sticker they speak. If someone tells them I was in the war they say something positive, most just thank me for the service.
                      About a year ago a man up the block, a Korean War Infantry vet, stopped by to talk as he does about once or twice a year. A young man pulled in next door and came over. He was just back from Iraq. He saw my Army sticker. Some of the terms were different for the three wars, but we understood each other perfectly. The young man is an Infantry Sergeant in the guard, and has since deployed to the Stan. There was no generation gap! I will not forget that short time we spent together. The Korean vet has since passed and I never saw the young Sergeant since.

                      Maybe it takes time.

                      Jim
                      Uttered after slapping his forehead. "Damb, why didn't I think of that?" Unknown 2LT

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        You will at times, run into one who want to question or challenge you on every little thing.
                        Bp, you won't have much to worry about if you don't dress up your avatar with a MACVSOG patch, tell tall tales about how you were a Recon Team leader in MACVSOG, and then when asked what Team you were on, refuse to name it based upon a right to 'privacy'.

                        Yes, we do have some real veterans on this site, and at least one or two whose claim to veteran status is questionable.
                        dit: Lirelou

                        Phong trần mi một lưỡi gươm, Những loi gi o ti cơm s g!

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Welcome bpmoore24!

                          Im also not a veteran, Im 34 y/old and as you and other guys here, I have a special respect and interest to anything related to Vietnam war since we can remember.

                          To get the things more complex, Im not even north-american, Im a brazilian guy, but this is not a restriction to my admiring and deep respect. I must pay a pray on the Wall on DC next week. Welcome abord and prepare yourself to be beyond the bravest men on earth.

                          Bye!

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Old Threads

                            Uh . . . I hope everybody realizes BP originally posted this in 2007 and has not posted anything since 2008. This is what can occasionally happen when new members like Don get curious about really old threads!




                            -- RR
                            www.RadioVietnam.net

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              I'm sorry, too.

                              I've met many Vietnam vets over the years and have always thought that these guys got the roughest of raw deals - not only in Vietnam but also on their return home. Whenever I hear the World War II generation being called 'the Greatest Generation', I always think of the men who went to fight in Indochina (and indeed Korea). They were made of exactly the same stuff as those who fought against the Axis powers but never received the same public recognition. So unfair!

                              Philip
                              Last edited by PhilipLaos; 26 Aug 10, 21:57.
                              "The whole problem with the world is that fools and fanatics are always so certain of themselves, and wiser people so full of doubts." Bertrand Russell

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