Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

A question for any veterans out there

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • A question for any veterans out there

    I was chatting to my dad a little while back who lived in the north of England back in the 1960's. He went to school with a guy who believed in fighting communism so much that he went to America to volounteer for the US army to fight in Vietnam. Did you gents in your experience come across many Brits/non US personel who had joined up for similar reasons or was it a very rare occurence.

  • #2
    Originally posted by copenhagen View Post
    I was chatting to my dad a little while back who lived in the north of England back in the 1960's. He went to school with a guy who believed in fighting communism so much that he went to America to volounteer for the US army to fight in Vietnam. Did you gents in your experience come across many Brits/non US personel who had joined up for similar reasons or was it a very rare occurence.
    I never ran into any Brits or Aussie but they sure were there. Canadians were there in numbers. Unless a Canadians tells you, you would think he was another American. They don't talk so funny like you people

    Boonierat has a great report on one of the more famous Brits that served in Nam.

    This might be of interest.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/shropshire/cult...the_cage.shtml

    http://www.mystae.com/reflections/vietnam/canada.html

    HP
    Class of 69-70
    Last edited by Half Pint John; 24 Jul 07, 09:59.
    "Ask not what your country can do for you"

    Left wing, Right Wing same bird that they are killing.

    you’re entitled to your own opinion but not your own facts.

    Comment


    • #3
      Forgive me for replying here. I am not a Vet but I have read countless memoirs of Vietnam vets and have run across this issue many times.

      As for Brits, the most famous one of all was a man named Rick Riscorla. He was at LZ Albany, the disasterous part of the "we were soldiers" Ia Drang Valley acton not told in the film or book, and later a hero of September 11 in NYC. He came to the US solely to go fight in Vietnam, but stayed on after the war. I posted a picture of him in the images section of the Vietnam forum. A true "American" Hero from Britain

      Now, I have read quite a bit about foreigners joining up just to fight communism. A couple of Brits for sure, but I have read about far more Eastern Europeans doing this. If you read a lot of memoirs written by VN vets it will not take you very long to find Poles, Russians, Czechs, Hungarians, and a whole host of East Europeans who managed to escape and then joined just to fight communism. This I have read about more times than I can count. Some of these men even wrote their own books. I forget the name at the moment but there is a good book written by a lithuanian escapee who served in VN. If you are interested I will dig through my collection and get the title for you.

      So it was quite common for foreigners to join up just to fight communism in Vietnam, and as you can imagine these were some very dedicated soldier who had no questions about why there was a war in VN. As to details about who came from where all I can say is that I have read about more escapees from communist countries doing this than anything, but have seen others mentioned. Including Brits, French, and Germans.

      M.S.

      Comment


      • #4
        I ran into a kid from England who was a doorgunner.
        Think he was there for the hell of it.
        There wer a LOT of E Europeans in SF. They were older guys from WW2 and that general era. We also had lots of hispanics with a bunch of Cubans tossed in.
        All those guys absolutely hated commies.

        Comment


        • #5
          Thanks very much for taking the time to reply guys, very interesting.I know there were rumours about the British SAS in vietnam , but I dont believe it but I knew about this guy my Dad knew and thought it interesting from a British point of view.Trung si, did u guys view that english door gunner as being like what the hell is he doing here is he mad or did you guys view people like them as being help gratefully recieved. Of course Americans did volounter to fight with us in the RAF at the start of ww2 so it goes both ways and that help was most definitely gratefully recieved. Again thanks very much.
          Last edited by copenhagen; 24 Jul 07, 16:59.

          Comment


          • #6
            Non US in VN

            Hello,
            This is an intriguing topic.

            A number of young men - teenagers - who had come with their families to the US from Estonia, Latvia, and Lithuania, and other parts of Eastern Europe as refugees from Soviet Communism certainly went on to college. I can report that at least three went to the University of Connecticut in the late 1950's, and graduated about the time I did. They were in the Army ROTC program, got their commissions (usually infantry) and served one or more tours in VN in the 1960's. One was later a classmate of mine at Leavenworth CGSC. Another Uconn grad, according to the Uconn alumni magazine some years ago, made full colonel of infantry with a solid record in VN, and then was invited to become the Commanding General of the Lithuanian Army in the 1990's. Whether he is still there now, I do not know.
            Red Dagger 18

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by copenhagen View Post
              Trung si, did u guys view that english door gunner as being like what the hell is he doing here is he mad or did you guys view people like them as being help gratefully recieved. Of course Americans did volounter to fight with us in the RAF at the start of ww2 so it goes both ways and that help was most definitely gratefully recieved. Again thanks very much.
              He was just another GI doing his job as far as I was concerned.
              All the guys I served with were volunteers several times over.
              Nobody ever questioned anybody's motivation.

              I am not trivializing war by any means, but there are those who will undertake such things as a personal adventure.
              Many of those I served my four years with continued to put themselves in harm's way their entire careers.
              Acquaintence of mine stayed in the reserves and was in Iraq at 59.
              He only left because of an injury.
              We all had visions of being "wild geese."

              Comment


              • #8
                Thanks Trung si

                Comment


                • #9
                  I personally did not meet any in my time in Nam. The only Aussies I met were in a band and were touring from bast to base to entertain. I got to know them while they were at Bien Hoa, and they were very cool people.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I too, met quite a number of Canadians who were serving. While some had a profound hate for communism, others were there because it was where the action was.
                    "War is hell, but actual combat is a motherf#cker"
                    - Col. David Hackworth

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by DeltaOne View Post
                      I too, met quite a number of Canadians who were serving. While some had a profound hate for communism, others were there because it was where the action was.
                      Same, 69-70, who could get the job done was the key. Might be interesting in that I found few in the non-combat areas.
                      My Avatar: Ivan W. Henderson Gunner/navigator B-25-26. 117 combat missions. Both Theaters. 11 confirmed kills. DSC.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by medivac View Post
                        I personally did not meet any in my time in Nam. The only Aussies I met were in a band and were touring from bast to base to entertain. I got to know them while they were at Bien Hoa, and they were very cool people.

                        A kid I went to school with in the UK ended up in the Aussie SAS and did two tours in VeitNam...A journalist I know did one year attached to the Aussie Army in Veit Nam...he said they were a bunch of hard ass b....... and very good at what they did.

                        per ardua ad astra

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Bow View Post
                          A kid I went to school with in the UK ended up in the Aussie SAS and did two tours in VeitNam...A journalist I know did one year attached to the Aussie Army in Veit Nam...he said they were a bunch of hard ass b....... and very good at what they did.

                          per ardua ad astra
                          That has always been my general presumption. The same goes with the ROK's

                          Then the American Draftees weren't push overs in the early years. Even if a lot of people like to dump on them.

                          Hello Oliver Stone, you listening?

                          HP
                          "Ask not what your country can do for you"

                          Left wing, Right Wing same bird that they are killing.

                          you’re entitled to your own opinion but not your own facts.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            With all the immigrants coming into the US, our armed forces recruit plenty of "greenhorns." In my experience, most Latin Americans make pretty good soldiers/sailors/airmen/Marines/Coasties. I was particularly impressed by Mexicans and Ecuadorians. Both are tough as nails, can hump all day without a gripe. Most Ecuadorians arriving in the US are country boys from the high Andes, and they can run around like billy goats. I must admit that I envy their stamina. I've known several young men from the West Indies (Jamaica, Trinidad & Tobago, etc) who emigrated to the US for the express purpose of joining the US armed forces. Having served with some of them I can say that I have no complaints.
                            I was married for two ******* years! Hell would be like Club Med! - Sam Kinison

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Remember the draft? Guess what, if you were in the USA, a male and within that age range you were elgible to be drafted and some were. Most of these were of Arabic origin who came to the USA to go to college and instead of going home stayed and endured their military consignment.

                              The most interesting couple of 'foreigners' I came across were a couple of guys who were 'Brown shirts' for the Nazi party. They were 15 years old and had just been drafted into the German army near the end of the war when they were captured by the Russians. The Russians shipped them to Siberia where they were doomed to work in the Gulags until they died. These two kids escaped the Gulag, found their way to Japan where they enlisted in the US Army of Occupation. They both ended up being interrogators for Military Intelligence. They did not make the best interrogators because they never believed what the POWs told them, they always thought the VC or NVA were trying to hide something. In reality if you asked the low ranking VC or NVA troops they'd tell you with no problem what you wanted to know. This was because they really didn't know anything. It was only the higher ranking echelon where you actually got to practice true interrogation techniques.
                              "If you are right, then you are right even if everyone says you are wrong. If you are wrong then you are wrong even if everyone says you are right." William Penn.

                              Comment

                              Latest Topics

                              Collapse

                              Working...
                              X