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Military Lingo: Frag Order

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  • Military Lingo: Frag Order

    A quick question to our english-speaking members out there, what exactly does the US military call a fragmentary order? (or frag order for short), I've came across the term a lot lately during my readings and it seems to be the order given to each specific unit involved in a large scale operation, but can't say for certain.

  • #2
    A Frag order is an order given to a unit, either in writing or oral (more common) that modifies the unit's current order but does not completely change the original order. It is given usually when the situation has changed enough to warrant a change in the plan or order already given to a unit.
    Blackcloud6

    Refighting World War II - One hex at a time!

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    • #3
      That pretty much covers it, Boonie.

      On the Plains of Hesitation lie the blackened bones of countless millions who, at the dawn of victory, sat down to rest-and resting... died. Adlai E. Stevenson

      ACG History Today

      BoRG

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Admiral
        That pretty much covers it, Boonie.
        Indeed, thanks guys

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        • #5
          My understanding is a "frag" order is a portion of the daily orders, which cover the entire force under control of the issuing authority. The portion of these orders which apply to a specific unit are a "fragment" of these daily orders. Instead of issuing orders with all the boilerplate to each unit, one set of orders is issued to the entire command. Also allows other units to see what the orders of adjacent or supporting units are.
          "Common sense is the collection of prejudices acquired by age eighteen." - Albert Einstein

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          • #6
            Who am I supposed to believe now heh?

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            • #7
              fragmentary order
              (DOD) An abbreviated form of an operation order (verbal, written or digital) usually issued on a day-to-day basis that eliminates the need for restating information contained in a basic operation order. It may be issued in sections. It is issued after an operation order to change or modify that order or to execute a branch or sequel to that order. Also called FRAG order.
              http://www.dtic.mil/doctrine/jel/dod...a/f/02222.html

              fragmentary order
              (NATO) An abbreviated form of an operation order, issued as required, that eliminates the need for restating information contained in a basic operation order. It may be issued in sections.
              http://www.dtic.mil/doctrine/jel/dod...m/f/00503.html

              ================================================== ===

              Lesson 1
              OPERATION, WARNING, AND FRAGMENTARY ORDERS

              OVERVIEW

              Lesson Description:


              In this lesson, you will learn to prepare and issue an operation order (TOW), a warning order, and a fragmentary order.

              Terminal Learning Objective:

              Action: Prepare and issue an operation order (TOW), a warning order, and a fragmentary order.
              Condition: You will be given information contained in this lesson.
              Standard: Identify the procedures for preparing an operation, warning, and fragmentary order.
              References: The material contained in this lesson was derived from the following publications—

              FM 7-91 1987
              FM 23-34 1994

              1. . Fragmentary orders (FRAGOs) provide pertinent extracts from a more detailed order. They provide instructions, as they are developed, before the complete order has been issued; they provide specific instructions to leaders who do not need the complete order; and, more often, they provide timely changes to existing orders. Fragmentary orders do not have a specific format. However, to ensure understanding, the fragmentary order should follow the basic format of the operation order. Information unchanged from the operation order is omitted in a follow-up fragmentary order, as is nonessential or incomplete information.

              2. .

              a. A FRAGO provides brief, specific, and timely instructions without loss of clarity. FRAGOs contain changes or information of immediate concern. These orders may be written or oral. The FRAGO is issued to change an order that already has been issued.

              b. Only those items that are changed from the original order should be included in the FRAGO as long as clarity is not sacrificed.

              c. The words "no change" may be used to omit elements of the original OPORD that have not changed.

              d. There is no standard format for a FRAGO, but all changes should be presented in the same sequence as in the OPORD.

              e. When possible, the FRAGO should be issued to all personnel concerned at a central location. When that is not possible, the FRAGO may be issued by radio, telephone, or messenger. Regardless of how it is issued, all changes to the mission caused by the FRAGO must be understood by all who received the original order.

              3. .

              a. : The enemy is reinforcing his defensive positions. The timetable for the attack has been moved forward 30 minutes.

              b. : No change.

              c. : (YOUR) Antiarmor platoon will notify the Company/Team Commander when the last element clears stationary unit from the Phase line HIT to occupy Battle position one (BP1), BP2, BP3, and BP4 to support the attack.

              d. : No change.

              e. : No change.

              4. . The overlay is a graphic representation of the leader's scheme of maneuver and concept. It ensures coordinated action among all units. The fewest possible control measures are used so as not to clutter or confuse the overlay. However, the overlay must have enough control measures to allow flexibility when issuing changes to the operation order or the fragmentary order. If control measures or symbols other than those specified in FM 101-5-1 are used, a legend should be placed on the overlay to define the graphic.
              http://www.globalsecurity.org/milita...in0541/ch1.htm
              Andy "Weeble" Weaver

              Research, Reference and Historical Study

              Illud Latine dici non potest

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              • #8
                My understanding is a "frag" order is a portion of the daily orders, which cover the entire force under control of the issuing authority
                The US Army does not issue daily orders. Usuallu and Operation Order is written for a single operation or mission and stays in effect until the mission is complete regradless of time or it is rescinded or the situation demands a complete new order. The FRAGO is used to modify the original order as needed as stated in the post directly above.
                Blackcloud6

                Refighting World War II - One hex at a time!

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                • #9
                  Was that enough answers for you?
                  To whispers of Beethoven...

                  "Mein Gott! Die Invasion. Sie kommen!"
                  -Werner Pluskat

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Werner Pluskat
                    "Mein Gott! Die Invasion. Sie kommen!"
                    Me thinks he was suggesting a possible change in operational orders!

                    On the Plains of Hesitation lie the blackened bones of countless millions who, at the dawn of victory, sat down to rest-and resting... died. Adlai E. Stevenson

                    ACG History Today

                    BoRG

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