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49 Years Later, Huey Pilot To Receive Medal Of Honor

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  • 49 Years Later, Huey Pilot To Receive Medal Of Honor

    Vietnam War helicopter pilot to receive Medal of Honor 49 years after saving wounded soldiers



    Some five decades after he led a platoon credited with rescuing dozens of soldiers pinned down by enemy fire, a Vietnam War veteran will be awarded the nation's highest military honor for valor, the White House announced on Tuesday.

    In May 1967, Army Maj. Charles Kettles led several helicopter trips to help evacuate wounded soldiers near the district of Duc Pho. He returned to the landing zone without additional aerial support to rescue stranded soldiers pinned down by enemy fire. The White House says Kettles helped save the lives of 40 soldiers.

    Kettles retired from the Army in 1978 as a lieutenant colonel. He resides in Ypsilanti, Michigan, with his wife, Ann.


    Full Story: http://www.foxnews.com/us/2016/06/21...-soldiers.html
    "War is hell, but actual combat is a motherf#cker"
    - Col. David Hackworth

  • #2
    Trying hard to be the Man, that my Dog believes I am!

    Comment


    • #3
      Yes for sure

      Good old Duc Pho.
      "Ask not what your country can do for you"

      Left wing, Right Wing same bird that they are killing.

      you’re entitled to your own opinion but not your own facts.

      Comment


      • #4
        This is the first time I remember a helicopter pilot from the Vietnam era receiving the Congressional Medal of Honor. I think it's long overdue. The helicopter pilots I encountered during my tour of duty were all brave and performed above and beyond the call of duty. The actions of the Medevac pilots in particular were especially commendable and I will never forget how they saved the lives of many in the unit to which I was assigned.
        "I have never known a combat soldier who did not show a residue of war." --Sergeant Ed Stewart, 84th Division, US Army, WWII

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Greybriar View Post
          This is the first time I remember a helicopter pilot from the Vietnam era receiving the Congressional Medal of Honor. I think it's long overdue. The helicopter pilots I encountered during my tour of duty were all brave and performed above and beyond the call of duty. The actions of the Medevac pilots in particular were especially commendable and I will never forget how they saved the lives of many in the unit to which I was assigned.
          Yup-- There was Bruce "Snake..." Crandall received MOH in 2007.
          https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bruce_P._Crandall

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          • #6
            A Cross recipient, Kettles has been on permanent display at Michigan's Own Military and Space Hero's Museum. You should be able to read his story of how he rescued troops under heavy enemy fire.

            “Breaking News,”

            “Something irrelevant in your life just happened and now we are going to blow it all out of proportion for days to keep you distracted from what's really going on.”

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            • #7
              Not to take away from these pilots in any way..........sometimes it just grunts my ass that they hardly ever mention that most of the time there was a gunner and crew chief sitting right behind those guys watching their "6". A lot of those pilots had armour plate around those seats.........never saw any for the gunners........

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              • #8
                DIG IT - RIGHT ON !!!

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by jeffdoorgunnr View Post
                  Not to take away from these pilots in any way..........sometimes it just grunts my ass that they hardly ever mention that most of the time there was a gunner and crew chief sitting right behind those guys watching their "6". A lot of those pilots had armour plate around those seats.........never saw any for the gunners........
                  Find a picture of his shot up helicopter and you might think different of the armor plate around the seat which was usually a couple of flack jackets. It's amazing that thing was able to make it back with a shot out front canopy and damaged tail rotor.
                  http://veteransradio.net/1-november-...edal-of-honor/
                  http://www.mlive.com/news/ann-arbor/...eran_to_r.html
                  “Breaking News,”

                  “Something irrelevant in your life just happened and now we are going to blow it all out of proportion for days to keep you distracted from what's really going on.”

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                  • #10
                    Jeff, not to take anything away from you door gunners, but weight was a crucial factor, and if you lost a door gunner, the chopper might still fly. But lose the pilot, and everybody goes down.
                    dit: Lirelou

                    Phong trần mài một lưỡi gươm, Những loài giá áo túi cơm sá ǵ!

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by lirelou View Post
                      Jeff, not to take anything away from you door gunners, but weight was a crucial factor, and if you lost a door gunner, the chopper might still fly. But lose the pilot, and everybody goes down.
                      And, according to the links, he was fighting to get a damaged chopper into the air that was estimated to be 600 pounds overweight with the eight rescued men and his crew.
                      “Breaking News,”

                      “Something irrelevant in your life just happened and now we are going to blow it all out of proportion for days to keep you distracted from what's really going on.”

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I suspect that most Pilots would agree that any award they received was for the efforts of the Crew and no one person individually.
                        As others have said, I salute them and THANK them, one and all for their actions, especially in my regard.

                        (From a post VN pilot, 75-91; didn't like helicopters in VN mostly because they took me places and left me and when they came to pick me up, I had to leave cover to get to them; was ALWAYS convinced that they NEVER had ENOUGH gunners on them for all the fire that was coming into the helicopter; on more than one occasion going into the LZ, had gunners pushing me to get out BEFORE I was ready to unazz and almost took/grabbed one with me out into a water buffalo wallow with water in the bottom((and laid in the 10 inches of water just savoring my satisfaction for a bit)); and was never truly convinced that some of the flying antics by the pilots wasn't from ignorance rather than planned activity.)

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                        • #13

                          “Unthinking respect for authority is the greatest enemy of truth.” -- Albert Einstein

                          The US Constitution doesn't need to be rewritten it needs to be reread

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by lirelou View Post
                            Jeff, not to take anything away from you door gunners, but weight was a crucial factor, and if you lost a door gunner, the chopper might still fly. But lose the pilot, and everybody goes down.
                            what did the copilot do?

                            (Congratulations to Major Kettles. I'd give a few of the pilots who pulled my team out a medal too)
                            Happy just to be alive

                            Americans will always do the right thing.
                            After they've tried everything else
                            Winston Churchill

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by exlrrp View Post
                              what did the copilot do?

                              (Congratulations to Major Kettles. I'd give a few of the pilots who pulled my team out a medal too)
                              Here is the complete story of that day in history. (very large image.)
                              “Breaking News,”

                              “Something irrelevant in your life just happened and now we are going to blow it all out of proportion for days to keep you distracted from what's really going on.”

                              Comment

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