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  • Religion persecution in Viet Nam

    Originally posted by DANNGOC View Post


    These two photos show that religion is not respect in Viet Nam.

  • #2
    Phieu, for me, those photos merely prove that children are children. I agree that many young Vietnamese adults today do not view religion in the same light as their grandparents did, but at the same time I find both religion and superstition alive and well in my travels throughout Vietnam. Governments change, but peoples change more slowly.
    dit: Lirelou

    Phong trần mi một lưỡi gươm, Những loi gi o ti cơm s g!

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    • #3
      Children's behaviors reflect the adult's attitudes.
      You did not and do not notice the Vietnamese government's maltreatment of the various religions in Viet Nam?
      Last edited by Phieu; 07 Oct 12, 10:31.

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      • #4
        Religion persecution in Viet Nam

        This thread is in response to Miss Saigon's suggestion:

        If you wish to start a thread about respect for religion in Vietnam you may do so.
        As a way to start:

        VIETNAM: Religious persecution intensifies, study says

        BANGKOK, 31 March 2011 (IRIN)
        Pendulum of persecution

        In 2005, Vietnam passed comprehensive religious freedom legislation, outlawing forced renunciations and permitting official recognition of new denominations.

        In November 2006 the US removed Vietnam from its blacklist of "Countries of Particular Concern", determining that the country was no longer a "serious violator" of religious freedoms as defined by the US 1998 International Religious Freedom Act.

        But a Vietnam Human Rights Sanctions Act submitted in January 2011 to the US Congress noted that "despite reported progress in church openings and legal registrations of religious venues, the government of Vietnam has halted most religious reforms since the Department of State lifted the 'country of particular concern' for religious freedom violations designation".

        The situation is particularly grim for unregistered ethnic minority Protestant congregations, noted the bill's authors, involving forced renunciations of faith; pressure to join government-recognized religious groups; arrest and harassment; the withholding of social programmes provided for the general population; destruction of churches and pagodas; confiscation and destruction of property, and severe beatings.

        However, HRW noted in its report a decade-long cycle of government repression that interspersed "arbitrary arrest, imprisonment and torture" with public works, land allocation and improved educational opportunities to address Highlander grievances.

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        • #5
          Phieu, No maltreatment of religious persons ever takes place when I'm around. I am aware of the conflict with unregistered Protestant denominations. I am also aware of the restriction under which the Catholic church operates. But I cannot speak with the voice of authority regarding actual events of religious maltreatment. I have to rely upon reports of such, and at times I have found some of the claims that make the internet to be faulty.

          Ngoc, thanks for the photo of teh Cham tower. Binh Dinh had them everywhere. Glad to see they are still standing.
          dit: Lirelou

          Phong trần mi một lưỡi gươm, Những loi gi o ti cơm s g!

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          • #6
            In the mid ‘90’s I was taking a Political Science class at a CA College.
            The Prof. showed us the infamous photo’s of Buddhist Monks burning themselves to death in VN (in the ’60’s) and told the class they were protesting the US involvement there.
            I got up and said that was wrong, they were, in fact, protesting their own Catholic governments treatment of other religions.
            He was proud of his being a war protester and this was not the first time we had crossed swords. He refused to admit he was wrong.
            The next class I brought in a lot of proof and he ask me to leave his class.
            I had to get the Schools admin involved as he was going to give me an incomplete for the class.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by lirelou View Post
              Phieu, No maltreatment of religious persons ever takes place when I'm around.
              When you were in country, were you canalized in governmental guided tours or what?!
              At least, the Vietnamese government made sure to confine you within sanitized areas where foreigners like you are allowed to enter...

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Phieu View Post
                These two photos show that religion is not respect in Viet Nam.
                My church has play areas for kids and I occasionally have to shoo them off of the pews. I've heard about religious persecution in Vietnam and I'm not doubting you one bit. I'm just not sure this pic makes the point.
                A new life awaits you in the off world colonies; the chance to begin again in a golden land of opportunity and adventure!

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                • #9
                  THIS on the other hand, does.

                  A new life awaits you in the off world colonies; the chance to begin again in a golden land of opportunity and adventure!

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by mimike View Post
                    In the mid 90s I was taking a Political Science class at a CA College.
                    The Prof. showed us the infamous photos of Buddhist Monks burning themselves to death in VN (in the 60s) and told the class they were protesting the US involvement there.
                    I got up and said that was wrong, they were, in fact, protesting their own Catholic governments treatment of other religions.
                    You are both wrong: the CIA was behind it all in the attempt to get rid of Diem who was not accomodating to American government wishes at that time.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Pirateship1982 View Post
                      THIS on the other hand, does.

                      I don't think so.
                      These are rather civilians protesting land grabbing by the local government and are beaten while trying to protect their properties.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by mimike View Post
                        In the mid 90s I was taking a Political Science class at a CA College.
                        The Prof. showed us the infamous photos of Buddhist Monks burning themselves to death in VN (in the 60s) and told the class they were protesting the US involvement there.
                        I got up and said that was wrong, they were, in fact, protesting their own Catholic governments treatment of other religions.
                        He was proud of his being a war protester and this was not the first time we had crossed swords. He refused to admit he was wrong.
                        The next class I brought in a lot of proof and he ask me to leave his class.
                        I had to get the Schools admin involved as he was going to give me an incomplete for the class.
                        I agree with you sir..............

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by mimike View Post
                          In the mid 90s I was taking a Political Science class at a CA College.
                          The Prof. showed us the infamous photos of Buddhist Monks burning themselves to death in VN (in the 60s) and told the class they were protesting the US involvement there.
                          I got up and said that was wrong, they were, in fact, protesting their own Catholic governments treatment of other religions.
                          He was proud of his being a war protester and this was not the first time we had crossed swords. He refused to admit he was wrong.
                          The next class I brought in a lot of proof and he ask me to leave his class.
                          I had to get the Schools admin involved as he was going to give me an incomplete for the class.

                          Thanks to tenure the universities are still full of these dead beats.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Phieu View Post
                            I don't think so.
                            These are rather civilians protesting land grabbing by the local government and are beaten while trying to protect their properties.
                            VOM says it was a pastor under attack. I think it's their pic. You have an alternate source?
                            A new life awaits you in the off world colonies; the chance to begin again in a golden land of opportunity and adventure!

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Miss Saigon View Post
                              Thanks to tenure the universities are still full of these dead beats.
                              An without tenure, any professor could be fired without cause for saying anything that offended those in power.
                              No one has greater love than this, to lay down one's life for one's friends John 15:13

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