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American volunteer units at Leipzig?

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  • American volunteer units at Leipzig?

    I read in "Napoleon's Marshals" by David Chandler (though not really written by him) that a American volunteer unit fought at the Battle of the Nations. I read it only in passing and I didn't notice it until I re-read the sentence. The book didn't seem to source the statement, and I'm curious at to how a American unit ended up in Europe in the first place at that time.

    Would anyone here have more information about this puzzling piece of (mis?)information?

  • #2
    Not only Leipzig, but an American regiment was also present at the
    Battle of Waterloo with Wellingtons British and Ally contingent.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by General Brock View Post
      Not only Leipzig, but an American regiment was also present at the
      Battle of Waterloo with Wellingtons British and Ally contingent.
      Oh my...really? Where they there willingly?

      Comment


      • #4
        American Regiments...

        Which American unit was this? And on what page in Chandler's Napoleon's Marshals is the reference to it?

        Sincerely,
        M
        We are not now that strength which in old days
        Moved earth and heaven; that which we are we are; One equal temper of heroic hearts
        Made weak by time and fate but strong in will
        To strive to seek to find and not to yield.

        Comment


        • #5
          They were part of Sir John Lambert's command and fought of there
          own free will as far as I can see. You can find this at page 377 in
          the Waterloo letters by Siborne.

          Comment


          • #6
            I suspect those with Wellington was the Loyal American Regiment made up of American Royalists exiled after the Revolutionary War.
            Eagles may fly; but weasels aren't sucked into jet engines!

            "I'm not expendable; I'm not stupid and I'm not going." - Kerr Avon, Blake's 7

            What didn't kill us; didn't make us smarter.

            Comment


            • #7
              10th Infantry Brigade

              Lambert's infantry brigade consisted of the 4th, 27th, and the 40th Regiments of Foot. I don't see an 'American' regiment in the brigade. The
              4th and 40th were British regiments, and the 27th an Irish regiment. The
              2d Battalion of the 81st Regiment was also assigned to the brigade but was detached and not present at Waterloo.

              The Loyal American Regiment was a loyalist regiment from the War of the American Revolution. It was disbanded when that war ended and the men of the regiment emigrated to and settled in Canada.

              Does anyone have a citation from Chandler's book?

              Sincerely,
              M
              We are not now that strength which in old days
              Moved earth and heaven; that which we are we are; One equal temper of heroic hearts
              Made weak by time and fate but strong in will
              To strive to seek to find and not to yield.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Massena View Post
                Lambert's infantry brigade consisted of the 4th, 27th, and the 40th Regiments of Foot. I don't see an 'American' regiment in the brigade. The
                4th and 40th were British regiments, and the 27th an Irish regiment. The
                2d Battalion of the 81st Regiment was also assigned to the brigade but was detached and not present at Waterloo.

                The Loyal American Regiment was a loyalist regiment from the War of the American Revolution. It was disbanded when that war ended and the men of the regiment emigrated to and settled in Canada.

                Does anyone have a citation from Chandler's book?

                Sincerely,
                M
                I'm not quite sure where I saw it; but I think it would be somewhere with Bernadotte's or Poniatowski's entries.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Massena View Post
                  Lambert's infantry brigade consisted of the 4th, 27th, and the 40th Regiments of Foot. I don't see an 'American' regiment in the brigade. The
                  4th and 40th were British regiments, and the 27th an Irish regiment. The
                  2d Battalion of the 81st Regiment was also assigned to the brigade but was detached and not present at Waterloo.

                  The Loyal American Regiment was a loyalist regiment from the War of the American Revolution. It was disbanded when that war ended and the men of the regiment emigrated to and settled in Canada.

                  Does anyone have a citation from Chandler's book?

                  Sincerely,
                  M
                  Better recheck Kevin because the 4th regiment was an American Brigade
                  under Colonel Brooke in the field on the 18 of June as listed on page 376 -
                  377.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    4th Foot-King's Own Regiment

                    James,

                    The 4th Foot is the King's Own Regiment. That isn't an American regiment, but an old British outfit that was in North America in 1775. One battalion of that regiment was in Lambert's brigade.

                    The material in HT Siborne's The Waterloo Letters on page 377 is on the 42d Foot, the Black Watch. The 44th Foot is mentioned in the second of the letters, another British infantry regiment.

                    The 4th Foot is not mentioned nor is it on page 377 of William Siborne's History of the Waterloo campaign.

                    The page numbers in your copy may not correspond to that in my copy. Which letters about which units in your copy are being discussed?

                    Sincerely,
                    Kevin
                    We are not now that strength which in old days
                    Moved earth and heaven; that which we are we are; One equal temper of heroic hearts
                    Made weak by time and fate but strong in will
                    To strive to seek to find and not to yield.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      American Army

                      James,

                      The reference is on page 394 of my copy. The reference to the 'American Army' means the British troops that served in North America during the War of 1812. It does not mean that the 4th Foot was an American regiment. It was a British infantry regiment which fought against the Americans at Bladensburg, North Point, and New Orleans.

                      Sincerely,
                      K
                      We are not now that strength which in old days
                      Moved earth and heaven; that which we are we are; One equal temper of heroic hearts
                      Made weak by time and fate but strong in will
                      To strive to seek to find and not to yield.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Kevin,

                        I never said it was William, that's not the book I am getting
                        it from or quoting from it says word for word from Major J.
                        Browne" The 4th Regiment being the only Regiment of the
                        American Army which was in the field, it had very few officers or
                        men, no field officer (as Colonel Brooke commanded the
                        Brigade), only 2 Captains, one of whom commanded the
                        regiment." That is what the letter states on page 376 H.T.
                        Siborne.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by General Brock View Post
                          Better recheck Kevin because the 4th regiment was an American Brigade
                          under Colonel Brooke in the field on the 18 of June as listed on page 376 -
                          377.
                          What he may have meant was, that the 4th, 27th, and 40th, sailed home from America immediately after New Orleans, Fort Bowyer, Mobile and were able to participate at Waterloo. those regiments were not made up of American nationals.

                          1/4th (Kings own)
                          1/27th (Inniskilling) (were a British Regiment)
                          1/40th (2nd Somersetshire)

                          http://www.britishempire.co.uk/force...thkingsown.htm

                          If you search around in the many reminiscences, you will find that quite a substantial amount of individual Americans fought with distinction within the British army throughout the peninsular and Waterloo campaigns; Many of them going back to the States after their military service.

                          Paul
                          Last edited by Dibble201Bty; 24 May 10, 03:00.
                          ‘Tis said his form is tiny, yet
                          All human ills he can subdue,
                          Or with a bauble or medal
                          Can win mans heart for you;
                          And many a blessing know to stew
                          To make a megloamaniac bright;
                          Give honour to the dainty Corse,
                          The Pixie is a little shite.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            If there had been any Yanks at Waterloo...
                            surely His Grace would have commented on 'em, being even slower to get into the action, than even the Prussians!!!

                            Last edited by Von Richter; 24 May 10, 02:52.
                            The long toll of the brave
                            Is not lost in darkness
                            Over the fruitful earth
                            And athwart the seas
                            Hath passed the light of noble deeds
                            Unquenchable forever.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              That might be it as there is another passage worded the same by
                              Captain Drewe but it might mean that they came from America
                              but were soldiers of the British Army, the wording is very misleading.

                              Comment

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