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A question about cavalry charge!

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  • A question about cavalry charge!

    When a a regiment of cavalry (about 700 men) charge a line of infantry at full speed, how many men would be killed or hard injured due to the shock ONLY ?

    I know it depends on somethings, so lets say the cavalry were lancers and the infantry had bayonets (not in a square formation) .

  • #2
    I don't think they would hit them head on they would probably roll
    up there flank and it would certainly be a massacre.
    But if they hit them head on they would likely just run them over and stomp
    them to death our stab them to death. Most infantry would not
    stand in line they would run from attacking Cavalry which for
    obvious reasons would be worse. Cut down from behind, stabbed,
    stomped, bitten...

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    • #3
      It would depend on the terrain and the formation the Cavalry used to charge. While a thin line of Infantry did contain Cavalry occasionally, usually the Infantry would form a square formation. Cavalry usually could not break a square. It is a bit like the old child's game of Paper, Rock, Scissors. If Infantry forms a square in the presence of Cavalry, the enemy artillery would blast it. If the Infantry forms a schirmish line, the Cavalry can just go around it and aim for the wagons or the rear. If the Cavalry forms a column to hit the schirmish line, the Infantry is about to get hurt bad. By the way, if you were the Poor Bloody Infantry, you would aim your shots at the horse and then ground your piece facing out. Horses dislike charging a line of bayonets.

      Pruitt
      Pruitt, you are truly an expert! Kelt06

      Have you been struck by the jawbone of an ASS lately?

      by Khepesh "This is the logic of Pruitt"

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      • #4
        Cavalry vs Infantry

        The French would usually charge in a column of squadrons, or regiments, or whatever was at hand. Between charges, if available, horse artillery would be used to hit the infantry and then the cavalry would go in or go in again.

        There's a comment in Faber du Faur on how horse artillery should be used to support cavalry, based on an actual incident in Russia where Murat completely misused his attached Wurttemberg horse artillery thereby letting the majority of the Russian infantry escape.

        Cavalry would also as has been said, hit an exposed flank or if there were enough, as at Eylau, hit them head on in a column of divisions and just roll over them.

        Sincerely,
        M
        We are not now that strength which in old days
        Moved earth and heaven; that which we are we are; One equal temper of heroic hearts
        Made weak by time and fate but strong in will
        To strive to seek to find and not to yield.

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        • #5
          So would the half of the infantry regiment die ?

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Hurricane93 View Post
            So would the half of the infantry regiment die ?
            I think it`s not possible to tell how much of infantry will die and how much of cavalry as it depends from lots of factors - terrain, experience of troops (both infantry and cavalry), weather, morale, fatique etc.

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            • #7
              Read Keegan's Face of Battle. He says that 'impact' didn't happen. Horses will not willingly collide with other living things, especially a wall of bayonets. He cites also, cavalry vs cavalry charges from eyewitnesses where both opposing lines rode through each-other, often with few or no casualties.Keegan also disputes impact during infantry melee. One side may recoil (watch films of riots or football violence) but it does break up into individual or group combats. It wasn't a Rugby scrum.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Compans View Post
                He cites also, cavalry vs cavalry charges from eyewitnesses where both opposing lines rode through each-other, often with few or no casualties.
                IIRC this one goes back as far Polybius and the battle Cannae.

                I always believed the principal goal of a cavalry charge is to disrupt the enemy *formation* after which individual soldiers or small units are easy targets.
                Lambert of Montaigu - Crusader.

                Bolgios - Mercenary Game.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Snowygerry View Post
                  IIRC this one goes back as far Polybius and the battle Cannae.

                  I always believed the principal goal of a cavalry charge is to disrupt the enemy *formation* after which individual soldiers or small units are easy targets.
                  This is how Police use horses too.

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