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Books: Best Books/Links on The Napoleonic Era

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  • Originally posted by Dibble201Bty View Post
    I would get Guy Dempseys. He has done other Napoleonic titles, the one I have is NAPOLEON'S SOLDIERS - The Grande Armee of 1807 as depicted in the Paintings of the Otto Manuscript. ISBN: 1854092421 which Imho is a minor classic. Anyway, his Albuera book has very good reviews.

    Paul
    My avatar: Center of the Cross of the Légion d'honneur (Legion of Honour) of the First French Empire (Napoleonic Era), 3rd type (awarded between 1806-1808). My Légion d'honneur. :-)

    Comment




    • Just received my copy from Amazon and the uniforms are
      excellent it will be the best resource book to date on uniforms
      that I own.

      Regards
      James

      Comment


      • What is the best history of the Napoleonic Wars out there? Something that gives you the history of the whole period and also analyses these events.

        Comment


        • Originally posted by -snafu- View Post
          What is the best history of the Napoleonic Wars out there? Something that gives you the history of the whole period and also analyses these events.
          Campaigns of Napoleon by David Chandler is the standard work on the military campaigns.
          If the art of war were nothing but the art of avoiding risks,glory would become the prey of mediocre minds. Napoleon

          Comment


          • Originally posted by the Iron Duke View Post
            I'm reading "1812, Napoleon's fatal March on Moscow" by Adam Zamoyski at the moment. So far a good read. It's the first proper book about Napoleon's Russian campaign I'm reading.
            I agree that it is a good read, but I enjoyed his Rites of Peace even more. This book was thoroughly absorbing from start to finish. Tallyrand, Castlereagh, Alexander, Metternich etc - they are all there, painted convincingly by the author as sincere but self-serving and flawed individuals. A great book about a fascinating event.

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            • Arthur Bryant:

              The Years of Endurance (1793-1802)

              Years of Victory (1802-1812)

              The Age of Elegance (1812-1822)

              A good political and military overview of the revolutionary and Napoleonic wars with a good amount of social history of the time thrown in

              The first two books were written whilst WWII was in progress. The last, just after its end

              If you want to read books in which you can almost touch and feel the age, then get these books, but if you only read one of them, then get the Years of Victory.

              Paul
              ‘Tis said his form is tiny, yet
              All human ills he can subdue,
              Or with a bauble or medal
              Can win mans heart for you;
              And many a blessing know to stew
              To make a megloamaniac bright;
              Give honour to the dainty Corse,
              The Pixie is a little shite.

              Comment


              • Here is an interesting 'different' new book



                And here is a writeup about it.

                "Friedrich Lindau was a remarkable soldier who served with distinction under Wellington from Lisbon to Bayonne, and was involved in all major engagements, including Albuera, Salamanca, Vittoria and San Sebastian. More than 150 years after it was first written, A Waterloo Hero is the first translation of Lindau’s fascinating diary.

                Born in 1788, Lindau served with the King’s German Legion and was awarded the Waterloo Medal. Most notably, he fought and was captured at La Haie Sainte, and was the only ranking soldier mentioned in Major Baring’s account of the battle. For his actions he was awarded the Guelphic Medal for Bravery. However, he also had a reputation as a notorious forager and looter, and allegedly killed a civilian while on leave.

                Lindau’s account is unique: no other private soldier took part in so many engagements and recorded their experiences. This edition includes a foreword by Lindau’s pastor, and has been edited by Andrew Uffindel."

                Paul
                ‘Tis said his form is tiny, yet
                All human ills he can subdue,
                Or with a bauble or medal
                Can win mans heart for you;
                And many a blessing know to stew
                To make a megloamaniac bright;
                Give honour to the dainty Corse,
                The Pixie is a little shite.

                Comment


                • An interesting link about the Invasion of Russia 1812.


                  http://www.spiegel.de/international/...638751,00.html
                  An 18th century Imagi nation blog set in England/

                  Comment


                  • Originally posted by DaveHollinsMBA
                    There will be plenty in there. While I am delighted to see how far we have come with Austria in that it is top of the Continental Allies pile these days, I would be willing to bet that they have reproduced all that Haythornthwaite rubbish about the uniforms and titles - I took this up with them in 1995! They should have just paid their key authoprs a bit to cut and shut their nationalities into one chapter and altered the real horrors. Instead they used some bloke, who knows nothing about the wars to do it for every nation.
                    I'm afraid you are right. I have not read any more of the book, the mistakes that I posted earlier put me off. If anyone wants to buy it (I would only just recommend it for its illustrations and layout) Try and purchase it at a much reduced price. I paid £16.00 (US$26.00)for it and I am mightily relieved that I didn't fork out the full £30.00. (US$49.00)

                    Paul
                    ‘Tis said his form is tiny, yet
                    All human ills he can subdue,
                    Or with a bauble or medal
                    Can win mans heart for you;
                    And many a blessing know to stew
                    To make a megloamaniac bright;
                    Give honour to the dainty Corse,
                    The Pixie is a little shite.

                    Comment


                    • Interesting Books

                      For Waterloo I have found the following very helpful:

                      -1815 by Henry Houssaye
                      -The Campaign of Waterloo by John C. Ropes
                      -A History of the Waterloo Campaign by William Siborne

                      This interesting book gives a detailed series of tables of the different reorganizations of the French infantry arm from the end of the Old Regime to the second Bourbon Restoration. While in French, the tables are quite easy to figure out:

                      -Avantages du bonne discipline by JB Avril

                      This volume is one of the best memoirs of the period:

                      -Cavalry Outpost Duties by Antoine de Brack

                      Sincerely,
                      M
                      We are not now that strength which in old days
                      Moved earth and heaven; that which we are we are; One equal temper of heroic hearts
                      Made weak by time and fate but strong in will
                      To strive to seek to find and not to yield.

                      Comment


                      • Welcome aboard, Maréchal Massena.

                        Soon to be published by Editions Napoleon, From Elbe to Waterloo – The Imperial Guard in 1815: the organization, uniforms, equipment and armament of Napoleon's last guard. The book will be available in English and French.

                        Click at the corner to turn the pages: http://www.editions-napoleon.com/dyn...minisite=album

                        A review posted by Scott Mayne:

                        "This new book by Pierre Juhel is a significant and scholarly contribution to our understanding of the Imperial Guard of 1815. It claims to cover organization, uniforms, equipment, and armament. The last three items are certainly covered in as much detail as existing archival records allow. Organization-wise it's not definitive; there are officer lists for only a few units and theoretical unit strengths are only given at the company-level. This is somewhat disappointing, as it would be nice to have all this information in one book, but most of these details can be found elsewhere.

                        The book's strength is its exhaustive examination of uniforms, equipment, and armament. If the record exists, Juhel includes it. A few examples will hopefully give an idea of the depth of information given. On April 7th, 1815, the Foot Grenadiers took delivery of 509 bearskin bonnets (with grenade patches) from Busset, located on 13 Rue Dechargeurs, Paris, at a price of 37.95 francs each. On May 8th, 1815, the Foot Chasseurs received a variety of items for its band from Hebert, Poupard and Jarre, 14 Rue St. Sauveur, Paris, all meticulously detailed, including two pairs of epaulettes for a drum-major (at 192 F each) and a drum-major's swordbelt (worth 588 F). The Horse Grenadiers had a maximum of 891 bearskin bonnets available for service, 464 present at the date the Bourbons converted the unit to cuirassiers, 99 additional ones distributed during the First Restoration, and 328 delivered after that.

                        ... so there's lots covered. Not all units have such detailed information, as some archival records have not survived. Detailed tables are given for the Foot Grenadiers and Chasseurs, Voltigeurs, Horse Grenadiers and Chasseurs, Dragoons, and the Foot and Horse Artillery. Also included in the section devoted to each unit are text reproductions of orders and letters relating to the unit and written during the First Restoration or 100 Days. An exception is the section on the Marins, where the author basically says "read Lomier's book for more information" but this is not repeated elsewhere.

                        Rounding out the book are excellent original illustrations by Keith Rocco and numerous computer-generated uniform plates by Peter Bunde. The latter are accompanied by detailed text justifying the soldiers depicted, sometimes overturning received wisdom regarding the Guard of 1815. For example, the Horse Grenadiers are usually said to have campaigned in jackets with short turnbacks (like the cuirassiers the Bourbons converted them into) but regimental records show that they participated in their traditional long-turnbacked jackets.


                        Published by Editions Napoleon, the book is 256 pages and large-format. Anyone interested in the Imperial Guard of 1815 should find this a worthwhile addition to their library."


                        My avatar: Center of the Cross of the Légion d'honneur (Legion of Honour) of the First French Empire (Napoleonic Era), 3rd type (awarded between 1806-1808). My Légion d'honneur. :-)

                        Comment


                        • Thank You

                          Thanks very much. The book looks great. Is it available in the US yet? Keith Rocco's paintings are excellent. I have four of his prints and the work is both excellent and accurate.

                          Sincerely,
                          M
                          We are not now that strength which in old days
                          Moved earth and heaven; that which we are we are; One equal temper of heroic hearts
                          Made weak by time and fate but strong in will
                          To strive to seek to find and not to yield.

                          Comment


                          • Originally posted by Massena View Post
                            Thanks very much. The book looks great. Is it available in the US yet? Keith Rocco's paintings are excellent. I have four of his prints and the work is both excellent and accurate.

                            Sincerely,
                            M
                            Accordingly to Keith Rocco's website, "the book is due to be released this spring in France with an English version to be published at a later date."

                            Hope this will be published soon.
                            My avatar: Center of the Cross of the Légion d'honneur (Legion of Honour) of the First French Empire (Napoleonic Era), 3rd type (awarded between 1806-1808). My Légion d'honneur. :-)

                            Comment


                            • Keith Rocco

                              Keith is an excellent artist and a very good man. He has captured the Napoleonic period as few have. He has also done some excellent pictures of Guilford Courthouse from the War of the Revolution.

                              Sincerely,
                              M
                              We are not now that strength which in old days
                              Moved earth and heaven; that which we are we are; One equal temper of heroic hearts
                              Made weak by time and fate but strong in will
                              To strive to seek to find and not to yield.

                              Comment


                              • Although it doesn't really fit into the Napoleonic Era Forum, nor in any of the WTTA subforums, I decided to add this book recommendation to this forum. It's a book I recently bought and which was a long awaited add on to the two HUGE books on the Franco-Prussian, dated 1910, which I already have in my personaly library.
                                I've had the opportunity to read this book while I was on vacation in the Ardennes a few days ago:

                                It's Douglas Fermer's "Sedan 1870"



                                It was a perfect book, not too concise nor too detailed. Not too fat, nor too thin. It's an excellent book to have in hand for those that want to learn the basics of the fairly unknown Franco-Prussian War. It's a compelling study of the road to war, the military operations and the campaign itself. The motiviations for war of Napoleonic France and Wilhelmian Prussia are nicely described as the growing resentment between these two nations since the Battle of Jena in 1806 reached a high pitch. It shows the cunning diplomatic "traps" of Bismarck and the internal political powerstruggle in France under Napoleon III.
                                For those that want to know how Germany became unified must also read this book.
                                It's a true page turner and also a frustrating book when one reads of all the blunders that were committed in the French army during the War ...

                                Just buy it and read it !



                                Greets,
                                Stratego
                                Death is nothing, but to live defeated and inglorious is to die daily.- Napoleon

                                It is better to fail in originality than to succeed in imitation.- Herman Melville

                                Aut viam inveniam aut faciam

                                BORG

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