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'The Bravest of the Brave'...

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  • Dibble201Bty
    replied
    The 32nd never lost their Kings Colour even though there was an attempt to seize it 'hands-on'. I posted what happened either here or over on the TMP Napoleonic site some years ago. As for the grand Battery being cut up, I remember vaguely reading about the incident. It would mean re-reading to find the sources though

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  • Von Richter
    replied
    Another snippet...
    When the British Cavalry cut up the 'Grande Battery' they caught them limbered up and moving forward to support the Infantry assault on the ridge?

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  • Von Richter
    replied
    Just had a read at a novel of Waterloo called 'The Limits of Glory' by James McDonough. The book's blurb says it does for the battle what 'Killer Angels' did for Gettysburg, it doesn't. Still, it's an enjoyable romp through the last few days of Boneypart's innings though. All the usual bits are there, Ney's beetroot melon exploding all over the field as his gaffer sulks in the wings and British gunners dismantling the wheels from their 6pdrs on the very tips of the Imperial Guard's lances!
    But what saved the book, in my 'umble opinion, was the author's treatment of Blucher, his senior Occifers and the Prussian Army...
    he brings them all to life and they really march through the mud and gore and off the page. The author's a Yank, so he kind of forgets the prime directive of all Waterloo scribblings, to airbrush the Prussians from the entire shebang of His Grace's triumph, he even gives credit to a shower of Dutch/Belgians for contributing to the rout of the Old Guard!
    A good book for a half hour bedtime read, I enjoyed it. For a quid from the local junk shop, wot's not to like?






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  • Von Richter
    replied
    Only real gripe I had with the book was Horricks's claim that the 32nd lost a Colour at Waterloo during DeErlon's attack. There's something lurking at the back of my head about a Colour being seized by the French on the ridge, but getting re-captured and returned by a Trooper of the Union Brigade. Might have dreamed that one though!?
    If memory serves it was a party of the 32nd Regiment of Foot who carried Picton's body from the field.

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  • Von Richter
    replied
    Originally posted by Marshall Ney View Post
    Morning Everyone

    I have just joined the group.
    In relation to Ney, there is a single book worthy of note:

    'Marshal Ney - The Romances and the Real', Raymond Horricks, 1982

    "Unhappy man you were reserved for French bullets"
    Thanks for the heads up on 'Marshal Ney - The Romances and the Real'.
    I've just finished reading it, I didn't think he could go up any more in my estimation...
    but Marshal Ney has.

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  • Massena
    replied
    Davout and Oudinot were also friends, and there is a story about them during the winter in Poland where they were drunk one evening and were shooting out candles with their pistols. I don't know if it is true or not, but it should be.

    The friendship ended when Oudinot supported the Bourbons in 1814...

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  • Von Richter
    replied
    The book about Marshal Ney I'm reading, says that Ney and Lannes became firm friends. Not that hard to imagine really, as they both seem like a chip off the same block!

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  • Cambronnne
    replied
    Originally posted by Von Richter View Post
    'The March of the Twenty Six' has certainly rekindled my interest in Boneypart's Marshals. I've been considering gleaning 'The Emperor's Friend', but at over seventy quid it's a tad daunting, for something I'll read once then stick on a shelf....
    could be a candidate from the library though?

    I have the book and thoroughly enjoyed it.
    The price was a bit daunting especially since it isn't that long of a book.

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  • Massena
    replied
    You can definitely say that again. Just like the person who fell from the top of the Empire State Building...he was heard on the way down shouting 'so far so good!'

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  • Von Richter
    replied
    Thank you my dear Marshal. I can stand creeping old fartdom, so long as I can keep hold of wot's left of mi' marbles!

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  • Massena
    replied
    Happy Birthday! And many more...

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  • Von Richter
    replied
    It's a comforting feeling to have a Napoleonic book draw you in as quick as they have ever done. This one has, I'm enjoying discovering Marshal Ney immensely. So damn the expense, next one up will be 'The Emperor's Friend'.

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  • Von Richter
    replied
    Originally posted by Marshall Ney View Post
    Morning Everyone

    I have just joined the group.
    In relation to Ney, there is a single book worthy of note:

    'Marshal Ney - The Romances and the Real', Raymond Horricks, 1982

    "Unhappy man you were reserved for French bullets"
    The book arrived yesterday, a prezzie from Herself. Today's my Birfday, I'm going to spend it reading, sat on the seafront of our pokey little seaside resort...
    with Marshal Ney!

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  • Von Richter
    replied
    Here, in one volume, you've Sir Thomas Picton and more fighting irishmen than yer can shake a stick at!

    41xJHKQZJAL.jpg

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  • Marshall Ney
    replied
    Hello

    Napoleonic history is still a major area of interest here in Ireland/UK - remembering more Irishmen fought for the British than ever fought against them.

    The Irish in French service 'The Irish Legion' (1803) and those in Spanish service 'Regiment Irlandais' (1804/5) are specifically worthy of study. A point lost on many was that very few of these troops spoke English, Irish being their natural language. Anyone interested in Irish Napoleonic history might wish to look at the Osprey Men At Arms Book "The Wild Geese".

    Irish troops have fought all over the world e.g.the 69th New York 'The Fighting Irish' fought in two world wars (now the 165th Infantry).

    Ney

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