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Hussars /Dragoons/Lancers -roles on the battlefield

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  • Hussars /Dragoons/Lancers -roles on the battlefield

    What was the difference in the roles of Hussars /dragoons or lancers/uhlans ? on and off the battlefield

    were they not all essentially light cavalry ?

  • #2
    Hussars, Lancers and Uhlans have always been Light Cavalry to me. Great Britain had Light Dragoons for a while, which may have been what you were thinking of. Dragoons were kind of a Mounted Infantry. The Dragoons were placed in the Heavy Cavalry Brigade.

    Pruitt
    Pruitt, you are truly an expert! Kelt06

    Have you been struck by the jawbone of an ASS lately?

    by Khepesh "This is the logic of Pruitt"

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    • #3
      “Light Dragoons ” became Hussar regiments,I think, in the British Army,therefore certainly light cavalry. Again,though, “ Light Horse” ,at least in the Australian army, were mounted infantry- even if,on one celebrated occasion, they didn’t act like it.
      "I dogmatise and am contradicted, and in this conflict of opinions and sentiments I find delight".
      Samuel Johnson.

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      • #4
        Where and when is critically important to answering this question.

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        • #5
          so the charge of enemy infantry and cavalry was usually the realm of the heavy cavalry the curassier? they had big guys big horses and straight blade swords ? they also carried pistols too ?

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          • #6
            In Napoleon's army

            The "Light Cavalry" ("Hussars", "Chasseurs on horseback") crisscrosses the terrain, locates it, findss the enemy, estimates its strength and reports on it. But it is not only an observation force, it also attacks the enemy, harasses it, charging isolated groups, convoys. The Light Cavalry is equipped with a curved saber, making it possible to mow all that passes within its reach.

            The "Line Cavalry" is made up of "Dragons" and "Light-horse Lancers". Dragons are polyvalent units, having the great distinction of having to fight both on horseback and on foot. They could be used as simple horsemen (with a straight saber called "latte") or by using their mounts to deploy quickly like infantrymen towards a given point of the battlefield. Obviously they were also trained in the maneuver of the infantry.
            The "Light Horses" (with the curved saber of the "Light") did not enter the Grande Armée until 1807, when Napoleon entered the "Guard", a regiment of Polish Light Horses . The spear will not be used until later, making it possible to fight on equal terms with the Cossacks of the Russian army, and above all it had a very strong psychological impact on the enemy infantry.
            In the spirit of Napoleon, the Lancers, in addition to ensuring the link between the Armies and the escort missions, had to accompany the charges of the "Heavy Cavalry" (at the time we said "Big Cavalry") to serve as flankers.

            The "Heavy Cavalry" is made up of "Carabiniers" and "Cuirassiers". It is easily recognized by the breastplates worn by the riders.
            The "Carabiniers" are an elite corps (since the Ancient Regime) respected for its efficiency. In 1804, Napoàléon will equip them with the same rifle as the Dragons.
            The "Cuirassiers" form the "Heavy Cavalry" by excellence. Their usefulness is especially in the line combat to overthrow, in their dash, the enemy forces. This cavalry specialized in charge, is equipped with the straight saber, like the Dragons, but with a steel scabbard, instead of the leather one.

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            • #7
              The Hussars were a Hungarian invention inspired by their battles with the Turks in Hungary.

              Pruitt
              Pruitt, you are truly an expert! Kelt06

              Have you been struck by the jawbone of an ASS lately?

              by Khepesh "This is the logic of Pruitt"

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              • #8
                Originally posted by nastle View Post
                so the charge of enemy infantry and cavalry was usually the realm of the heavy cavalry the curassier ?
                And the Lancers obviously - they were considered particularly effective against other cavalry iirc.

                Lambert of Montaigu - Crusader.

                Bolgios - Mercenary Game.

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                • #9
                  If the Lance was so effective agin other Cavalry, why did they take 'em away from the second rank blokes, even in the ranks of Boneypart's exulted legions?

                  The long toll of the brave
                  Is not lost in darkness
                  Over the fruitful earth
                  And athwart the seas
                  Hath passed the light of noble deeds
                  Unquenchable forever.

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                  • #10
                    Lances never had much range...

                    Pruitt
                    Pruitt, you are truly an expert! Kelt06

                    Have you been struck by the jawbone of an ASS lately?

                    by Khepesh "This is the logic of Pruitt"

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Von Richter View Post
                      If the Lance was so effective agin other Cavalry, why did they take 'em away from the second rank blokes, even in the ranks of Boneypart's exulted legions?
                      I imagine they were only found effective in the first rank

                      Even in Medieval times lance armed cavalry was often followed up by sword or axe.

                      Not presenting this as fact mind you, but I think I remember reading somewhere the Brits equipped their own lancers after an unlucky meeting with the Polish lancers in Spain ?

                      https://www.jstor.org/stable/44223646?seq=1
                      Last edited by Snowygerry; 20 May 20, 04:04.
                      Lambert of Montaigu - Crusader.

                      Bolgios - Mercenary Game.

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                      • #12
                        I think we were a tad unlucky every time we came up agin Lancers, to be fair. I mean those cads and bounders with their overgrown toothpicks even caused His Majesty's Lifeguards to muddy their breeches!
                        Last edited by Von Richter; 20 May 20, 04:51.
                        The long toll of the brave
                        Is not lost in darkness
                        Over the fruitful earth
                        And athwart the seas
                        Hath passed the light of noble deeds
                        Unquenchable forever.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Von Richter View Post
                          I think we were a tad unlucky every time we came up agin Lancers, to be fair. I mean those cads and bounders with their overgrown toothpicks even caused the His Majesty's Lifeguards to muddy their breeches!
                          http://napoleonistyka.atspace.com/cavalry_tactics_2.htm

                          You are probably thinking about the film Battle of Waterloo but it does seem that lancers had a significant advantage over conventional cavalry.
                          "To be free is better than to be unfree - always."

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                          • #14
                            I suppose part of the "exercise of Lancers" mentioned in the letter above, involves to learn how to *not* impale the chap in front of you
                            Lambert of Montaigu - Crusader.

                            Bolgios - Mercenary Game.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Surrey View Post
                              http://napoleonistyka.atspace.com/cavalry_tactics_2.htm

                              You are probably thinking about the film Battle of Waterloo but it does seem that lancers had a significant advantage over conventional cavalry.
                              No, I know wot I was finkin' about, and it wasn't the cinema...
                              The day before, our heavies did the business on Boney's Lancers in the village of Genappe.

                              The French Lancers now advanced, and drove the 7th Hussars upon their reserve; but here the 7th rallied, renewed their attack, and forced the Lancers back upon the town. The latter having been reinforced, rallied, in their turn, and drove back the Hussars. These, however, again rallied, and resolutely faced their opponents, with whom they continued a fierce encounter for some time longer, without being productive of any favourable result, but in which the bravery of the 7th Hussars shone most conspicuously, and became the theme of admiration of all who witnessed it.
                              Upon receiving orders from Uxbridge the Hussars went about and attempted to disengage. However the French Lancers pursued the Hussars and in the mêlée which followed both sides lost about the same number of men. When at length the 7th Hussars were able to disengage they retired through the 23rd Light Dragoons, took the first favourable turn off the road and reformed in the adjoining field. A battery of British horse artillery had taken post close to a house on the height occupied by the heavy cavalry, and on the left of the road; and it was now replying to the French battery on the opposite bank of the river.
                              During this contest, the French, having become sensible of the evil that might arise from the closely wedged state of the cavalry in the town, began to clear the rear of the most advanced portions of the column, so as to admit of more freedom of movement in case of disaster.
                              So exceedingly elated were the French with having repulsed the 7th Hussars in this their first serious encounter with the British cavalry, that immediately on that Regiment retiring, the whole column that was in Genappe raised the war cry, and rent the air with shouts of "En avent! — En avant!". Evincing the greatest impatience to follow up this momentary advantage, and to attack the supports; for which, indeed, the opportunity appeared very favourable, as the ranks of the latter were suffering considerable annoyance from the well directed and effective fire of the French guns on the opposite bank of the river.
                              The French now abandoned the secure cover to which they had been indebted for their temporary success, and were advancing up the ascent with all the confidence of a fancied superiority, and started to advance up the hill out of Genappe.
                              1st Life Guards charge through GenappeUxbridge, seizing upon the advantage presented for attacking the French cavalry while moving up hill, with their flanks unsupported, and a narrow defile of the town and its bridge in their rear, brought forward 1st Life Guards through the 23rd Light Dragoons, who opened out for their passage to the front. The Life Guards now made their charge, most gallantly headed by Colonel Sir John Elley, Deputy Adjutant General, who, at the moment of contact with the French, began by cutting down two men right and left. It was truly a splendid charge; its rapid rush down into the mass of French cavalry, was as terrific in appearance as it was destructive in its effect; for although the French met the attack with firmness, they were utterly unable to hold their ground a single moment, were overthrown with great slaughter, and literally ridden down in such a manner that the road was instantaneously covered with men and horses, scattered in all directions. The Life Guards, pursuing their victorious course, dashed into Genappe, and drove all before them as far as the opposite outlet of the town.


                              Last edited by Von Richter; 20 May 20, 05:07.
                              The long toll of the brave
                              Is not lost in darkness
                              Over the fruitful earth
                              And athwart the seas
                              Hath passed the light of noble deeds
                              Unquenchable forever.

                              Comment

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