Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

'Keep 'Em Rolling'

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • 'Keep 'Em Rolling'

    If anyone is interested, there is a ca 1930s movie, 'Keep 'Em Rolling' being played on Turner Classic Movies (TCM) on 18 October.

    It is about a US artillery horse of War I, but the interesting part is the actual photography of active duty horse-drawn artillery in part of the movie. It shows what horse teams could do and how fast they could actually travel when necessary.
    We are not now that strength which in old days
    Moved earth and heaven; that which we are we are; One equal temper of heroic hearts
    Made weak by time and fate but strong in will
    To strive to seek to find and not to yield.

  • #2
    That movement would have had to be on good terrain to keep the wheels on the field piece and caisson. Pack Artillery on Mules would be interesting as well.

    Pruitt
    Pruitt, you are truly an expert! Kelt06

    Have you been struck by the jawbone of an ASS lately?

    by Khepesh "This is the logic of Pruitt"

    Comment


    • #3
      I believe the movie was shot on location at Fort Myer, Virginia which used to be a cavalry and artillery post. The artillery horse teams going at full speed in the movie, using the actual gun teams and artillerymen, is impressive.
      We are not now that strength which in old days
      Moved earth and heaven; that which we are we are; One equal temper of heroic hearts
      Made weak by time and fate but strong in will
      To strive to seek to find and not to yield.

      Comment


      • #4
        Is this thread in the wrong place? Should it not be in WW1?
        Human history becomes more and more a race between education and catastrophe (H G Wells)
        Mit der Dummheit kaempfen Goetter selbst vergebens (Friedrich von Schiller)

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by MarkV View Post
          Is this thread in the wrong place? Should it not be in WW1?
          I don't think so as it also applies to the Napoleonic period's horse drawn artillery.
          We are not now that strength which in old days
          Moved earth and heaven; that which we are we are; One equal temper of heroic hearts
          Made weak by time and fate but strong in will
          To strive to seek to find and not to yield.

          Comment


          • #6
            thanks. I will try to watch it.
            Avatar is General Gerard, courtesy of Zouave.

            Churchill to Chamberlain: you had a choice between war and dishonor. You chose dishonor, and you will have war.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Massena View Post

              I don't think so as it also applies to the Napoleonic period's horse drawn artillery.
              Or indeed any period's horse drawn artillery but more to WW1 as in the Napoleonic times only the British army used pole trailed carriages and limbers to any extent.
              Human history becomes more and more a race between education and catastrophe (H G Wells)
              Mit der Dummheit kaempfen Goetter selbst vergebens (Friedrich von Schiller)

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by MarkV View Post

                Or indeed any period's horse drawn artillery but more to WW1 as in the Napoleonic times only the British army used pole trailed carriages and limbers to any extent.
                The French Gribeauval System used a pole limber. The block trail gun carriages were only used by the British, but that was only universally used by the British since 1808 and that didn't always apply to North America from 1812-1815. The French adopted the block trail gun carriage with the new Valee Artillery System in 1827 and their limber and caisson were better designed as they had the ammunition boxes on both limbers and caissons as a one-piece ammunition 'box' instead of the British model of two boxes for limbers and caissons.

                The US Army would later adopt this system and it was used by both sides in the American Civil War.
                We are not now that strength which in old days
                Moved earth and heaven; that which we are we are; One equal temper of heroic hearts
                Made weak by time and fate but strong in will
                To strive to seek to find and not to yield.

                Comment


                • #9
                  https://web.archive.org/web/20140329...?s=&Movie=5300
                  We are not now that strength which in old days
                  Moved earth and heaven; that which we are we are; One equal temper of heroic hearts
                  Made weak by time and fate but strong in will
                  To strive to seek to find and not to yield.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    From Sound of the Guns by Fairfax Downey, 200-210:

                    ''Rodney', the most famous horse of the US Field Artillery, was a near-wheeler. Ridden by the driver of the rearmost pair of a six-horse team, his was the most important post. It was his duty and his mate's to furnish part of the draft, to swing the pole, or to hold back in the breeching, aided by cannoneers at the brakes, when the limber and gun behind them descended a down grade. When he joined the service in 1896, he was eight years old, an unusually good-looking light bay with dark points, of Thoroughbred and Clydesdale blood, 15.3 hands high, weight 1,250 pounds. He was named after Caesar Rodney of Delaware, who made a noted ride to Philadelphia to affix his decisive signature to the Declaration of Independence; or, as some say, he was the namesake of Colonel George B Rodney, a Civil War artilleryman.'

                    'Rodney was the pet of every driver who sat him and the pride of every battery with which he served. He was never sick and never refused a feed or a task. Intelligent, strong, and willing, he pulled so hard that sometimes he broke his harness. His great moment came at El Poso, Cuba, in 1898…When the guns of Light Battery A, 2d Artillery, badly needed on the firing line, became mired in a churned-up, almost impassable slough, Captain George S Grimes ordered all teams unhitched. Rodney and his teammate 'Shaw' alone were kept in draft. Urged by their driver, the mighty pair, belly-deep in mud, threw their weight into their collars, tugged for dear life at traces, and hauled limber and gun out onto firm ground. Then they extricated all the rest of the stalled carriages, and the battery galloped forward into action. The same day they rescued another bogged-down outfit, much to its chagrin, and later, before Santiago, repeated their feat. After the Cuban campaign Rodney made many a long route march, including one of seven hundred miles, averaging twenty-one a day, and in maneuvers always outlasted his fellows…'

                    'When the years began to tell on him, he was retired on the understanding that he would not be discarded and sold to pull a huckster's cart, dray, or dump wagon, but in 1916, without the knowledge of the battery, he was inspected, condemned, and put up at auction. Just in time his friends in the ranks got word and rushed to the sale, where against the competition of a mean-spirited dealer, who bid up the price, the artillerymen in heart-warming loyalty pooled their money to buy him for $107. USD A plea by the battery through military channels required nineteen endorsements but resulted in orders that at government expense Rodney would be provided stable, forage, and care 'wherever he may be for the rest of his life.' He lived it out doing light work, hoisting hay and grain to a loft, but playing hookey to graze whenever disposed. At the ripe old age of thirty his legs failed him, and he was mercifully put to sleep.'

                    So were the horses of strength and character that pulled the artillery in all weathers, under fire-stoically standing in place with their drivers without the satisfaction of shooting back.
                    We are not now that strength which in old days
                    Moved earth and heaven; that which we are we are; One equal temper of heroic hearts
                    Made weak by time and fate but strong in will
                    To strive to seek to find and not to yield.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Massena View Post

                      The French Gribeauval System used a pole limber.
                      Really can you show one?
                      Human history becomes more and more a race between education and catastrophe (H G Wells)
                      Mit der Dummheit kaempfen Goetter selbst vergebens (Friedrich von Schiller)

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by MarkV View Post

                        Really can you show one?
                        The standard Gribeauval limber with a central pole to which the gun team was hitched. The wheel team would be on either side of the central pole.

                        file:///C:/Users/Owner/AppData/Local/Packages/Microsoft.MicrosoftEdge_8wekyb3d8bbwe/TempState/Downloads/img20190927_14191532%20(1).pdf

                        Copy and load the address into your computer and the image will come up.

                        Definition of 'pole' regarding artillery limbers:

                        Pole: The tongue of a wagon or gun limber to which the horse team was harnessed. The wheel team would be on either side of the pole, and the swing and lead teams would be harnessed in front of it.

                        The standard British limber did not have a single central pole, but two on the right side of the limber into which one of the wheel horses was harnessed.

                        And the British limber was called a shafter limber, not a pole limber, for the two shafts on the right of the limber for harnessing the horses.

                        You can find both limbers in technical drawings in Ildefonse Fave's study of artillery, Etudes sur le passe et l’Avenir de l’Artillerie, volumes IV and V. At least one of the volumes is available on Google:

                        https://books.google.com/books?id=0J...page&q&f=false
                        Last edited by Massena; 11 Oct 19, 07:34.
                        We are not now that strength which in old days
                        Moved earth and heaven; that which we are we are; One equal temper of heroic hearts
                        Made weak by time and fate but strong in will
                        To strive to seek to find and not to yield.

                        Comment

                        Latest Topics

                        Collapse

                        Working...
                        X