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  • RIFLES...

    I'm currently re-reading this book, the Rifleman and their Officers were certainly a force to be reckoned with. In one skirmish they accounted for four out of five Colonels from the French Regiments opposing them... the one they didn't kill, they wounded.
    The long toll of the brave
    Is not lost in darkness
    Over the fruitful earth
    And athwart the seas
    Hath passed the light of noble deeds
    Unquenchable forever.

  • #2
    If you want to read the books on the subject. you should get these: http://www.buglehorn.co.uk/

    Any other history of the 95th is lightweight by comparison.

    George Caldwell, one of the authors of the above books, also published separately, a book about Rifleman Tom Plunkett.

    https://www.amazon.co.uk/Thomas-Plun.../dp/1907417036

    Paul
    ‘Tis said his form is tiny, yet
    All human ills he can subdue,
    Or with a bauble or medal
    Can win mans heart for you;
    And many a blessing know to stew
    To make a megloamaniac bright;
    Give honour to the dainty Corse,
    The Pixie is a little shite.

    Comment


    • #3
      If you mean Rifles by Mark Urban, I remember it fontly. I found it fascinating. I also liked the memoirs of John Kincaid. He certainly had wit.

      Comment


      • #4
        Stop it Dibs, stop it now... I'm not buying any more books... ever... well I don't think I am, but, I might do....... Bugger!!!
        The long toll of the brave
        Is not lost in darkness
        Over the fruitful earth
        And athwart the seas
        Hath passed the light of noble deeds
        Unquenchable forever.

        Comment


        • #5
          There's a nice passage in 'Rifles' where Soult's writing to Boneypart's Minister of War. It's a protracted snivel about running out of senior Occifer's to lead his attacks, thanks to His Grace's, eagle eyed Greenjackets!
          The long toll of the brave
          Is not lost in darkness
          Over the fruitful earth
          And athwart the seas
          Hath passed the light of noble deeds
          Unquenchable forever.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Von Richter View Post
            There's a nice passage in 'Rifles' where Soult's writing to Boneypart's Minister of War. It's a protracted snivel about running out of senior Occifer's to lead his attacks, thanks to His Grace's, eagle eyed Greenjackets!




            Every Frenchie had an F.M',s baton in his knapsack, so it wouldn't have been hard to fill up the gaps in the leader's vacancies. So not only was there a baton in the knapsack but also a Baker rifle 0.625 in, ball in the chest too!

            Like I said Von. The 'Rifle Green in the Peninsula' books are the definitive books. Urban's paperback pulp is but a collection of well-worn anecdotes and partial quotes.

            PS. Urban's book is 351 pages. Caldwell and Coopers cover from 1808 to 1815, are 1390 pages in total if you include the Waterloo volume. Oh! And that Andy McNab should take my advice too!
            Last edited by Dibble201Bty; 05 Dec 18, 08:16.
            ‘Tis said his form is tiny, yet
            All human ills he can subdue,
            Or with a bauble or medal
            Can win mans heart for you;
            And many a blessing know to stew
            To make a megloamaniac bright;
            Give honour to the dainty Corse,
            The Pixie is a little shite.

            Comment


            • #7
              I suppose Cornwell's "Sharpe's" series is laughable then?
              ARRRR! International Talk Like A Pirate Day - September 19th
              IN MARE IN COELO

              Comment


              • #8
                Considering they are fictional, no matter how good they may be, they aren't history.
                ‘Tis said his form is tiny, yet
                All human ills he can subdue,
                Or with a bauble or medal
                Can win mans heart for you;
                And many a blessing know to stew
                To make a megloamaniac bright;
                Give honour to the dainty Corse,
                The Pixie is a little shite.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Why is no one mentioning the 5th btn 60th Foot later the Kings Royal Rifle Corps originally the Royal Americans? This was formed in 1797 as a rifle unit six years before the 95th got their rifles and pioneered rifle tactics in the British army. Served with distinction in the Peninsular.
                  Human history becomes more and more a race between education and catastrophe (H G Wells)
                  Mit der Dummheit kaempfen Goetter selbst vergebens (Friedrich von Schiller)

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Because the book I'm rattling about is the story of 1st Bn. 95th Rifles!
                    I think I'm correct in saying that by and large the 60th, in the Peninsula, were parcelled out in separate Company's to stiffen the skirmish line. The 95th spent a lot longer operating as a Battalion, sometimes putting in an attack with every soldier in skirmish order, in front of their mates in the 43rd and 52nd.
                    The long toll of the brave
                    Is not lost in darkness
                    Over the fruitful earth
                    And athwart the seas
                    Hath passed the light of noble deeds
                    Unquenchable forever.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Dibble201Bty View Post

                      Every Frenchie had an F.M',s baton in his knapsack, so it wouldn't have been hard to fill up the gaps in the leader's vacancies. So not only was there a baton in the knapsack but also a Baker rifle 0.625 in, ball in the chest too!

                      Like I said Von. The 'Rifle Green in the Peninsula' books are the definitive books. Urban's paperback pulp is but a collection of well-worn anecdotes and partial quotes.

                      PS. Urban's book is 351 pages. Caldwell and Coopers cover from 1808 to 1815, are 1390 pages in total if you include the Waterloo volume. Oh! And that Andy McNab should take my advice too!
                      I'm trying to con the kids into getting me 'em for Crimbo... Tom Plunkett's book is already Amazoned!
                      The long toll of the brave
                      Is not lost in darkness
                      Over the fruitful earth
                      And athwart the seas
                      Hath passed the light of noble deeds
                      Unquenchable forever.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Von Richter View Post
                        Because the book I'm rattling about is the story of 1st Bn. 95th Rifles!
                        I think I'm correct in saying that by and large the 60th, in the Peninsula, were parcelled out in separate Company's to stiffen the skirmish line. The 95th spent a lot longer operating as a Battalion, sometimes putting in an attack with every soldier in skirmish order, in front of their mates in the 43rd and 52nd.
                        Yup! But in the first Peninsular campaign. At the Battles of Rolica and Vimerio, the 5/60th and 2nd/95th were brigaded and fought together.

                        This may be of interest:

                        https://www.helion.co.uk/browse-titl...1797-1818.html
                        Last edited by Dibble201Bty; 06 Dec 18, 20:51.
                        ‘Tis said his form is tiny, yet
                        All human ills he can subdue,
                        Or with a bauble or medal
                        Can win mans heart for you;
                        And many a blessing know to stew
                        To make a megloamaniac bright;
                        Give honour to the dainty Corse,
                        The Pixie is a little shite.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I do wish you'd stop doing that!!!


                          The long toll of the brave
                          Is not lost in darkness
                          Over the fruitful earth
                          And athwart the seas
                          Hath passed the light of noble deeds
                          Unquenchable forever.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Given the results of the riflemen, and their heavy employment in the campaign, why didn't the Brits issue more rifles?
                            Any man can hold his place when the bands play and women throw flowers; it is when the enemy presses close and metal shears through the ranks that one can acertain which are soldiers, and which are not.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Whilst accurate they were slow to load, much slower than the land service musket. The musket armed British infantry of the day had the highest fire rate in Europe (and North America) and could stop a charging French column in its tracks. They couldn't fire fast enough to do that with rifles. It wasn't until the Miné ball was invented that rifles could match sooth bore for rate of fire. Also the Baker rifle was very expensive
                              Human history becomes more and more a race between education and catastrophe (H G Wells)
                              Mit der Dummheit kaempfen Goetter selbst vergebens (Friedrich von Schiller)

                              Comment

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