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Officers of 17th Regiment of Foot 1799

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  • Officers of 17th Regiment of Foot 1799

    Does anyone have the list of officers of this regiment in the period 1799-1800? I am looking for Thomas Walker Chambers who became an Ensign in 1799. His enlistment date and details of the company commanders are my principal interests but other officers are also of interest.

    regards

    Keith

  • #2
    I probably only know what you know. Listed as an Ensign in the Leicestershire Regiment on 17th August 1799 and Lieutenant 22nd March 1802. He transferred into the 2nd 30th Cambridgeshire Regiment of Foot......

    http://www.caroledivall.co.uk/2009/0...the-30th-foot/

    Carole's books on the 30th are excellent (as are her related titles) and well worth owning.

    Then we have official rolls:

    https://books.google.co.uk/books?id=...201800&f=false

    https://books.google.co.uk/books?id=...20foot&f=false

    Paul
    Last edited by Dibble201Bty; 08 Oct 18, 03:54.
    ‘Tis said his form is tiny, yet
    All human ills he can subdue,
    Or with a bauble or medal
    Can win mans heart for you;
    And many a blessing know to stew
    To make a megloamaniac bright;
    Give honour to the dainty Corse,
    The Pixie is a little shite.

    Comment


    • #3
      Many thanks Paul. The date of his commission fits his possible inclusion in the regiments campaign in Den Helder in late 1799. Carole Divall's books have indeed opened up a course of study for me and I've bought two ("Redcoats" and "Wellington's worst scrape") and have two on order ("Inside the regiment" and "Napoleonic Lives") which I managed to read in the NLS. Chambers and his fellow officers, in addition to the extra details of the rankers provided in her regimental histories lift the study above the usual dry campaign and garrison unit histories. I have been enjoying "The Veteran or 40 years service in the British Army" lately alongside reading "Redcoats"....while also studying Cam Hobhouse's letters for the Waterloo campaign which has some curious opinions about some military contemporaries.

      best regards

      Keith

      Comment


      • #4
        Just to let you know that Thomas Walker Chambers is mentioned on pages 7, 59, 97, 98, 102, 114, 138 174, 175 of 'Inside the Regiment'. Seeing as you have read 'Napoleonic lives' you will know that Walker has a chapter (8) in his name on page 132.

        I won't remark on John Cam Hobhouse as I have scant memory of reading bits and pieces of his jottiings, of his fawning after Napoleon despite his brother being killed on the 16th June. I saw him as an odd-un' so didn't go any further.
        ‘Tis said his form is tiny, yet
        All human ills he can subdue,
        Or with a bauble or medal
        Can win mans heart for you;
        And many a blessing know to stew
        To make a megloamaniac bright;
        Give honour to the dainty Corse,
        The Pixie is a little shite.

        Comment


        • #5
          Inside the Regiment arrived this afternoon . On Hobhouse (Byron, Napoleon, J.C. Hobhouse, and the Hundred Days)
          I think the book is a very valid work solely on its frank description of contemporaries, as well as giving a lot of colour to the time. On his brother's death at Quatre Bras there's no mention among the letters that I can see and whether the event was too painful to recall or too private to discuss I can;t say.

          regards

          Keith

          Comment


          • #6
            His brother was killed whilst serving Colin Halkett as an orderly during the battle. He was a 6th company captain of the ill fated 69th.

            J. Hobhouse was still a funny type though, whatever his thoughts of his brother's death.
            ‘Tis said his form is tiny, yet
            All human ills he can subdue,
            Or with a bauble or medal
            Can win mans heart for you;
            And many a blessing know to stew
            To make a megloamaniac bright;
            Give honour to the dainty Corse,
            The Pixie is a little shite.

            Comment


            • #7
              He was indeed. However there does seem to have been a remarkable amount of support for Napoleon from Britain.

              Comment


              • #8
                As there was a lot more French against Napoleon. And as with democracies, sympathy could be and was aired. Even in WWI and WWII. There was lots of sympathy coming from the left in the UK in regards the IRA. It happens with all countries but is really only noted in countries who allowed their people to air their views, even in time of conflict..
                Last edited by Dibble201Bty; 22 Oct 18, 01:44.
                ‘Tis said his form is tiny, yet
                All human ills he can subdue,
                Or with a bauble or medal
                Can win mans heart for you;
                And many a blessing know to stew
                To make a megloamaniac bright;
                Give honour to the dainty Corse,
                The Pixie is a little shite.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Well I think the sympathy was for the concept of a united Ireland rather than the IRA, without a Protestant bias, but as you rightly say this is the measure of a democracy. The IRA, UDA, UFF and other militant groups of either side (right and left) were Ultras who believed if you killed everyone who disagreed with you then you'd eventually win. Sadly that appears to still be the thought several of our former colonies (USA included). I should however point out that this was the thought process prior to the British arriving....and post our departure...Our last British civil war was in 1746 (Irish conflicts of 1798 etc. notwithstanding).

                  I should state at this point that my maternal ancestors are from County Cork (until 1870).

                  Comment

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