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  • Curryasars...

    Did they always carry muskets when on campaign?

    The long toll of the brave
    Is not lost in darkness
    Over the fruitful earth
    And athwart the seas
    Hath passed the light of noble deeds
    Unquenchable forever.

  • #2
    When initially formed, the 12 cuirassier regiments were armed with a sword and two pistols. After 1809 they were also armed with a musqueton, which was not a musket, but a carbine.
    We are not now that strength which in old days
    Moved earth and heaven; that which we are we are; One equal temper of heroic hearts
    Made weak by time and fate but strong in will
    To strive to seek to find and not to yield.

    Comment


    • #3
      Technically speaking a musqueton is not a carbine. A carbine had fittings for a cavalry sling whereas the musqueton had an infantry style sling.I don't know about the French but in the Prussian service a carbine had no fitting for a bayonet but a musqueton did. The main part of the gun could be identical and so over time the two definitions have fused. Musquetons were originally issued to engineers, artillery men etc

      Carbine in fact derives from Karabiner which is "side slung for mounted use" and musqueton from Musketoon a short musket

      Thinking about it possibly wearing a cuirasse might make it difficult to sling a carbine across the back so a musqueton with an infantry style sling might have been better
      Last edited by MarkV; 05 Jun 18, 06:43.
      Human history becomes more and more a race between education and catastrophe (H G Wells)
      Mit der Dummheit kaempfen Goetter selbst vergebens (Friedrich von Schiller)

      Comment


      • #4
        I would recommend two things: first, if you can, go to Les Invalides and see the musqueton, also known as a musqueton de cavalerie, where you can see the ring and slide on the left side of the weapon that would hook onto the crossbelt for cavalry units, including the cuirassiers (after 1809). It is what would be known as a carbine in English.

        Second, the musqueton is shown in photographs from the Musee de la Armee in Les Invalides in two books: Napoleon et ses Soldats, Volume I by Paul Willing which shows the right side of the musqueton/carbine and its bayonet on page 88. Volume II, also by Paul Willing, shows the left side of the musqueton/carbine on page 30 which clearly shows the slide and ring on the stock that would attach to an appropriate shoulder belt. It also has a bayonet.

        There was also an alternate method of carrying the musqueton/carbine which was on the right side of the saddle with the muzzle in a boot and the butt attached to the saddle by a sling. The picture of this arrangement, also on page 30 of Volume II, shows the musqueton/carbine attached to a saddle of chasseurs a cheval.

        Lastly, the Guard Chasseurs a Cheval who carried the musqueton/carbine with bayonet attached the bayonet when forming a small four-man square from the picket when accompanying the Emperor on foot.
        We are not now that strength which in old days
        Moved earth and heaven; that which we are we are; One equal temper of heroic hearts
        Made weak by time and fate but strong in will
        To strive to seek to find and not to yield.

        Comment


        • #5
          ..if you can, go to Les Invalides and see the musqueton..
          Some clear pics from their webpage here,

          https://basedescollections.musee-arm...il.hidesidebar
          High Admiral Snowy, Commander In Chief of the Naval Forces of The Phoenix Confederation.
          Major Atticus Finch - ACW Rainbow Co.

          Comment


          • #6
            The slide and ring are on the other side. The ability to use a sling with the musqueton was necessary as it was also used by infantry musicians, bandsmen, sapeurs. It was also issued to hussars, chasseurs a cheval and gendarmes and then the cuirassiers and carabiniers. The artillery and supply train troops also used the musqueton. The musqueton's effective range was three-quarters of the infantry fusil. The dragoons, voltigeurs and foot artillery were issued the dragoon musket and bayonet. This was probably the same weapon issued to the Guard heavy cavalry.
            We are not now that strength which in old days
            Moved earth and heaven; that which we are we are; One equal temper of heroic hearts
            Made weak by time and fate but strong in will
            To strive to seek to find and not to yield.

            Comment


            • #7
              Thanks chaps, but can we apply the KISS principle if possible? I'm painting up some Perry 28mm plastic Curryasars and think them great musket/musqueton,carbine/musketoon kind of spoil the look of the thing... can I get away with just leaving them off?

              The long toll of the brave
              Is not lost in darkness
              Over the fruitful earth
              And athwart the seas
              Hath passed the light of noble deeds
              Unquenchable forever.

              Comment


              • #8
                Yes...It looks better anyways.
                We are not now that strength which in old days
                Moved earth and heaven; that which we are we are; One equal temper of heroic hearts
                Made weak by time and fate but strong in will
                To strive to seek to find and not to yield.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Thank you my dear Marshal...
                  a noble voice of reason in a mad, mad world!
                  Never thought I'd ever say that about your good self!!!

                  The long toll of the brave
                  Is not lost in darkness
                  Over the fruitful earth
                  And athwart the seas
                  Hath passed the light of noble deeds
                  Unquenchable forever.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Seriously chaps thanks for the help. Nothing looks better than well painted armoured French heavy cavalry, hope I can do these splendid models justice.
                    The long toll of the brave
                    Is not lost in darkness
                    Over the fruitful earth
                    And athwart the seas
                    Hath passed the light of noble deeds
                    Unquenchable forever.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I agree with Kevin on this point They look better without too.

                      You should Frenchify your 'Curryasars' with an 'e'....

                      Paul
                      ‘Tis said his form is tiny, yet
                      All human ills he can subdue,
                      Or with a bauble or medal
                      Can win mans heart for you;
                      And many a blessing know to stew
                      To make a megloamaniac bright;
                      Give honour to the dainty Corse,
                      The Pixie is a little shite.

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