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  • Here a history of the 13th Cuirassier Regiment. It was first raised in 1635 as the D'Esclainvilliers Regiment and was finally dissolved in 1998, than being the 3rd Cuirassier Regiment of the 8th Moterised Brigade.

    The 3rd Cuirassier Regiment ( _fr. 3e Régiment de Cuirassiers, 3e RC) was a cavalry regiment of the French Army, later reequipped as an armored regiment.

    History

    Ancien Régime

    Timoléon de Sercourt d’Esclainvilliers inherits his fathers company of Light horse in 1635, he was three years old. The same year in May, Cardinal Richelieu decides to reorganize the French Cavalry, Esclainvilliers company becomes part of the Cardinal Duc regiment. It fought in the Battle of Rocroi as a part of that regiment. During this time the unit becomes the Esclainvilliers Cavalry, the ancestor of the 3rd Cuirassier Regiment.

    The regiment distinguished itself fighting in Flanders in 1650. In 1652, under the command of Turenne, it fights against the fronders in Paris and is present at Stenay. The regiment is renamed the Commissaire General Regiment in April 1656.

    The regiment sets up six companies in 1665 for the reconquest of Flanders. The regiment takes part in the siege of Maastricht in 1673, and then is garrison for a time in Franche-Comté before it returns to Flanders. It stays in Flanders during both the nine years’ war and War of Spanish Succession

    The regiment joins the Army of the Rhine at Landan in 1742; with it the regiment distinguishes itself at Ratisbon. It is sent to the Army of the Alps in 1746, but the war ends the next year with the peace of Aux-la-Chapelle. During the Seven years’ war it is sent to Saint-Lô in 1762 to defend the French coastline. In 1791, the regt was renamed 3rd Regiment de Cavalrie. In 1802/03 the Regiment was renamed the 3rd Cuirassiers.

    Napoleonic Period

    Valmy (1792), Marengo, Austerlitz,Jena,Eylau,Friedland,Heilsberg. In 1807 a detachment was sent to Spain where it was combined with detachments from the 1st and 2nd Cuirassiers and the 1st and 2nd Carabiniers to form the 1st Provisional Heavy Cavalry (designated the 13th Cuirassiers at the end of 1808). Eckmuhl,Essling,Wagram,Ostrowono,Smolensk,Borodino ,Dresden,Liebertwolkwitz,Liepzig,Champaubert,Fere-Champenoise. In the first restoration (1814), the regiment was named the Régiment de Cuirassiers du Dauphin. With the return of Napoleon in 1815, the regiment was renamed 3eme Régiment de Cuirassiers. It fought at Fleurus and Waterloo. It was disbanded with the restoration on 25 November.

    July Monarchy and Second Empire

    The final fall of the Bourbons and the establishment of the July Monarchy mean that the regiment once again becomes the 3rd Cuirassier Regiment. Between 1830 and 1869, the regiment is garrison in Lyon and Luneville.

    When war was declared between France and Prussia in 1870, the regiment was garrison in Luneville. The regiment enters Haguenau on 2 August, then Reichshoffen, where it fights in the Battle of Woerth. There it took part in the great cavalry charge. The remains of the regiment withdraws in good order and arrives at Saverne on 7 August and after a short rest there marches to join the Army of Chalons-sur-Marne, which it does on 20 August 1870. After passing through Floing the regiment retreats to Sedan on 1 September, with the rest of its division.

    In the evening of 4 March, the regiment is sent to Paris. The March Regiment becomes the 3rd Cuirassier Regiment again on 1 April 1871.

    World War I

    The regiment crosses the Franco-Belgian border on 6 August and takes part in the operations around Florenville. It takes part in engagements of the Great retreat and the following race to the sea. It then holds the trench lines until March 1918 in the North, Somme and Champagne, at that time the German had exhausted its last resources.

    The regiment is part of the 4th Cavalry Division, which takes part in the offensive that brings victory to the allies, particular in July 1918 at Saint-Pierre-Aigle and in August at Montdidier. The regiment is at Detergheim in Flanders, when the armistice is signed on 11 November 1918. It takes part in the victory parade in Brussels ten days later.

    The regiment receives two new inscriptions on the standard for its service during the war: “Belgique 1914-1918” and “Picardie 1918”. The regiment is dissolved in 1919 in the aftermath of the war.

    Battle of France

    The regiment is reformed on 16 May 1940 in the region of Fontevraud-Saumur, as a part of the mobilization for the war with Germany. It is equipped with Somua and H-35 tanks and becoming part of the 1st Cuirassier Division.

    The regiment moves on Abbeville on 27 May, where it resists the Germany push, before being forced to retreat to Beauvais. During its retreat it fights rearguard actions at Cormonville and Cheverny. Hostilities are suspended on 25 June and cease fire orders are given to all units; the regiment is dissolved on 31 July 1940.

    Algerian War

    The regiment is reformed in 1952 and on 23 March 1956, the regiment disembarks in Oran, Algeria, first moving to Tlemcen then Sebdou. It takes part in the operations to maintain law and order, guarding the Moroccan-Algerian border. The regiment takes part in several operations in the area.

    The regiment is reorganized to a reconnaissance regiment normally used in Algeria on 1 April 1957. It will be reorganized several more times during the war and in October 1962 it is attached to the 43rd Brigade, based at Mers-el-Kebir.

    After eight years of service in Algeria, the regiment embarks for France on 4 June 1964. The regiment is dissolved on 15 June 1964 at Camp Sissonne.

    Last reformation

    The regiment is reformed in 1968 in Chenevières, France, as an armored regiment of the 8th Motorized Brigade in Lunéville. It is original equipped with AMX-13 tanks, but reequipped with the AMX-30 tanks in 1973.

    The regiment is reorganized in 1992, when some regiments of the French Force in Germany are dissolved after the fall of the Berlin Wall and end of the Cold War. The regiment absorbs the 2nd Squadron of the 5th Cuirassier Regiment and the E.E.D. of the 57th D.B., a new squadron is also created and equipped with the AMX-30B tanks.

    A squadron is sent to former Yugoslavia in 1994 as a part of the United Nations Protection Force; it is in Croatia for its four months deployment. The regiment also detaches some officers as observers for the UN to Western Sahara in 1997. The regiment is dissolved for the final time in 1998 in the reforms that sweeps the French Army.

    Honors

    Battle Honors

    *Marengo 1800
    *Austerlitz 1805
    *La Moskowa 1812
    *Champaubert 1814
    *Belgique 1914-1918
    *Picardie 1918

    Decorations

    *Croix de guerre 1914-1918 with a silver star

    Lineage

    *1645: D'Esclainvilliers
    *1654: Commissaire Général
    *1791: 3rd Cavalry Regiment
    *1803: 3rd Cuirassier Regiment
    *1815: Cuirassiers du Dauphin
    *1815: 3rd Cuirassier Regiment
    *1815: Dissolved
    *1816: Cuirassiers d'Angoulème
    *1824: Cuirassiers de Bordeaux
    *1830: 3rd Cuirassier Regiment
    *1919: Dissolved
    *1940: 3rd Cuirassier Regiment
    *1940: Dissolved
    *1952: 3rd Cuirassier Regiment
    *1964: Dissolved
    *1968: 3rd Cuirassier Regiment
    *1998: Dissolved

    However, not clue about the brown uniform yet. Maybe it was brown because they were formed froma provisonal regiment in 1808?

    Comment


    • I believe that the 13 Cuirassiers had a brown uniform because they used spanish monks material which by all accounts was easily to come by. Both sides used the material for items of clothing & even whole uniforms throughout the war in spain.

      Oh yes! The wool that was used was a natural dark brown type that didn't need dying

      Paul
      Last edited by Dibble201Bty; 04 Mar 09, 16:41.
      ‘Tis said his form is tiny, yet
      All human ills he can subdue,
      Or with a bauble or medal
      Can win mans heart for you;
      And many a blessing know to stew
      To make a megloamaniac bright;
      Give honour to the dainty Corse,
      The Pixie is a little shite.

      Comment


      • Originally posted by Dibble201Bty View Post
        I believe that the 13 Cuirassiers had a brown uniform because they used spanish monks material which by all accounts was easily to come by. Both sides used the material for items of clothing & even whole uniforms throughout the war in spain.

        Oh yes! The wool that was used was a natural dark brown type that didn't need dying

        Paul
        You are probably right, Paul. Many of the French dragoon regiments in Spain lacked uniforms, horses and equipment. For example, in Spain they were dressed in the brown cloth of the Capucines found in convents and churches.
        My avatar: Center of the Cross of the Légion d'honneur (Legion of Honour) of the First French Empire (Napoleonic Era), 3rd type (awarded between 1806-1808). My Légion d'honneur. :-)

        Comment


        • Would anyone know what regiment these soldiers in "Sharpe's Enemy" are trying to portray?

          I know some regiments such as the Guards had gold lace for Sergeants but gold lace for every man? Is it just a piece of artistic licence? Sorry the picture is not the best, its from youtube.
          Attached Files

          Comment


          • Also, staying with the theme of Curassiers here is a nice plate by Funken.

            Comment


            • Originally posted by Lt-Bromhead View Post
              Also, staying with the theme of Curassiers here is a nice plate by Funken.

              I think I have the book at home which includes this print. It is a book by Funken with uniform pictures on nearly every page from the 1700s up to the late 1800s including explanations about the uniforms.

              Comment


              • I think I have the book at home which includes this print. It is a book by Funken with uniform pictures on nearly every page from the 1700s up to the late 1800s including explanations about the uniforms.
                Do you mind if I ask how much you paid for it and whether you recommend it or not? I have heard good things but it is a little pricey on some sites. Sorry for being nosey!

                Comment


                • Originally posted by the Iron Duke View Post
                  I think I have the book at home which includes this print. It is a book by Funken with uniform pictures on nearly every page from the 1700s up to the late 1800s including explanations about the uniforms.

                  This one?

                  1st Empire: http://www.darnault-mil.com/Galerie/Empire.php

                  Revolution to Consulate: http://www.darnault-mil.com/Galerie/Rev_Cons.php
                  My avatar: Center of the Cross of the Légion d'honneur (Legion of Honour) of the First French Empire (Napoleonic Era), 3rd type (awarded between 1806-1808). My Légion d'honneur. :-)

                  Comment


                  • Here is some more Conrad plates: Chasseurs a cheval de la garde

                    Again, for those having trouble viewing the pictures in repd's post

                    Paul
                    Attached Files
                    Last edited by Dibble201Bty; 05 Mar 09, 16:18.
                    ‘Tis said his form is tiny, yet
                    All human ills he can subdue,
                    Or with a bauble or medal
                    Can win mans heart for you;
                    And many a blessing know to stew
                    To make a megloamaniac bright;
                    Give honour to the dainty Corse,
                    The Pixie is a little shite.

                    Comment


                    • And some Grenadiers a Cheval de la Garde

                      Paul
                      Attached Files
                      ‘Tis said his form is tiny, yet
                      All human ills he can subdue,
                      Or with a bauble or medal
                      Can win mans heart for you;
                      And many a blessing know to stew
                      To make a megloamaniac bright;
                      Give honour to the dainty Corse,
                      The Pixie is a little shite.

                      Comment


                      • Originally posted by Dibble201Bty View Post
                        Here is some more Conrad plates: Chasseurs a cheval de la garde

                        Again, for those having trouble viewing the pictures in repd's post

                        Paul
                        Once again, many thanks.
                        Ed

                        Comment


                        • My problem is with the Rigo plates which repd posted - all I get is a message saying that the file type is not recognised.
                          Regards
                          gerry McGinty

                          Comment


                          • Originally posted by Lt-Bromhead View Post
                            Do you mind if I ask how much you paid for it and whether you recommend it or not? I have heard good things but it is a little pricey on some sites. Sorry for being nosey!
                            To be honest, it was a Christmas present from my brother when I was 13 years old. So I have no idea how much it costs today. But I would say, it's definetly worth the investment or at least thinking about. Even now I still get lost in it for hours.

                            Comment


                            • Originally posted by Zouave View Post
                              Well, certainly all the pictures from the first empire were included in the book, however none of the pictures between the revolution and the consulate. The trouble is, I'm in London at the moment and the book is at home in Germany. I can't remember the exact title. I have to check it out when I get back home on the 18th. By the way, my copy is in German and not in English.

                              Comment


                              • the file type is .rar you need to download rar(unrar) from the internet
                                this is like a zip file

                                Comment

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