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  • Napoleonic Books

    We have numerous books on Napoleon and his army, Nelson and his navy, Waterloo, Wellington and the Peninsular, but do you think there are areas of the Napoleonic wars left undermentioned or not mentioned at all, that you would like to see in print.
    Never Fear the Event

    Admiral Lord Nelson

  • #2
    Good one mike...
    I'd like to see more books on the diplomatic activities of Napoleon from his rise to his fall...letters to diplomats, what has been said and discussed between Napoleon and the other European or non-European heads of state (Ottomans, Americans for example) and what the consequences were !
    I'd also like to find a book on the officers and generals post-Napoleonic period ! What happened to Erlon, Vandamme, Friant, Morand, and many other AFTER Waterloo...did they emigrate to the states, what did the common soldiers do afterwards: were they able to get used to civilian life after years of fighting under the Emperor !!!
    And of course, I'm still looking for an in-depth and all-compassing study of the different maneuvres (columns, lines, l'ordere mixte) of the Napoleonic infantry, cavalry and artillery (see my thread on column variations !) and some thorough examples of these on the Napoleonic battlefields...
    Also an in-depth study of the medical service in the Grande Armée is welcome...
    So Historians...there is still alot of work to do....

    Greets,
    Stratego
    Death is nothing, but to live defeated and inglorious is to die daily.- Napoleon

    It is better to fail in originality than to succeed in imitation.- Herman Melville

    Aut viam inveniam aut faciam

    BORG

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    • #3
      I would go with the medical services, all i've read on the subject has been very sparse, also i would also like to see at least one book on the intelligence side of the war, be it French or British or any other nation, i.e spying, exploring officers and the code breaking. And one subject not really mentioned much would be the privateers, especially the French, like Robert Surcouf.
      Also i have noticed there is not a lot on the formations and manoeuvres as Stratego mentioned, very sparse.
      Last edited by Post Captain; 05 Aug 07, 12:28.
      Never Fear the Event

      Admiral Lord Nelson

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Stratego View Post
        Good one mike...
        I'd like to see more books on the diplomatic activities of Napoleon from his rise to his fall...letters to diplomats, what has been said and discussed between Napoleon and the other European or non-European heads of state (Ottomans, Americans for example) and what the consequences were !
        I'd also like to find a book on the officers and generals post-Napoleonic period ! What happened to Erlon, Vandamme, Friant, Morand, and many other AFTER Waterloo...did they emigrate to the states, what did the common soldiers do afterwards: were they able to get used to civilian life after years of fighting under the Emperor !!!
        And of course, I'm still looking for an in-depth and all-compassing study of the different maneuvres (columns, lines, l'ordere mixte) of the Napoleonic infantry, cavalry and artillery (see my thread on column variations !) and some thorough examples of these on the Napoleonic battlefields...
        Also an in-depth study of the medical service in the Grande Armée is welcome...
        So Historians...there is still alot of work to do....

        Greets,
        Stratego
        There is a book out there called "Napoleon's Generals". It has a short biography of almost every general who served in the Waterloo campaign. Most of the biographies are no more than a couple of pages, but there was enough to get a general idea of what happened to them after the Napoleonic wars ended.
        Avatar is General Gerard, courtesy of Zouave.

        Churchill to Chamberlain: you had a choice between war and dishonor. You chose dishonor, and you will have war.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by mike brown View Post
          I would go with the medical services, all i've read on the subject has been very sparse, also i would also like to see at least one book on the intelligence side of the war, be it French or British or any other nation, i.e spying, exploring officers and the code breaking. And one subject not really mentioned much would be the privateers, especially the French, like Robert Surcouf.
          Also i have noticed there is not a lot on the formations and manoeuvres as Stratego mentioned, very sparse.
          Try this one here:

          http://www.amazon.com/Man-Who-Broke-.../dp/0060934557
          http://www.irelandinhistory.blogspot.ie/

          Comment


          • #6
            Don't really know. There is a story about Napoleon and the Pyramids after the battle there, but that would never make a complete book.
            History of War Podcast

            Episode 1: Why Study Military History?

            Comment


            • #7
              Going along with the theme of formations and tactics, I can understand the difficulty of writing a book about these topics. But at the time of these wars there were loads of books written out by each countries high commands, and a multitude of private attempts. If only access to these would be easier, or possibly editions of these with comparative commentaries between the content of that book and it's contemporaries were available.

              In case people were wondering I was referring to books like The Fundamentals of the High Art of War by Archduke Charles (Austrian), or Rules and Regulations for the Formation, Field-Exercise and Movements of His Majesty's Forces by Sir Dundas (British).

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by wwagstyl View Post
                Going along with the theme of formations and tactics, I can understand the difficulty of writing a book about these topics. But at the time of these wars there were loads of books written out by each countries high commands, and a multitude of private attempts. If only access to these would be easier, or possibly editions of these with comparative commentaries between the content of that book and it's contemporaries were available.

                In case people were wondering I was referring to books like The Fundamentals of the High Art of War by Archduke Charles (Austrian), or Rules and Regulations for the Formation, Field-Exercise and Movements of His Majesty's Forces by Sir Dundas (British).
                Have you tried this Site?

                http://www.napoleon-series.org/

                IIRC they have a Link to electronic books online about Napoleonic warfare.
                http://www.irelandinhistory.blogspot.ie/

                Comment


                • #9
                  Cheers for the link. Seems an interesting website, but after a quick glance around, it's not exactly what I'm looking for. What I'd really like to find is digitalised copies of books that were written around that period, such as those mentioned in my previous post.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Stratego View Post
                    Good one mike...
                    I'd like to see more books on the diplomatic activities of Napoleon from his rise to his fall...letters to diplomats, what has been said and discussed between Napoleon and the other European or non-European heads of state (Ottomans, Americans for example) and what the consequences were !
                    I'd also like to find a book on the officers and generals post-Napoleonic period ! What happened to Erlon, Vandamme, Friant, Morand, and many other AFTER Waterloo...did they emigrate to the states, what did the common soldiers do afterwards: were they able to get used to civilian life after years of fighting under the Emperor !!!
                    And of course, I'm still looking for an in-depth and all-compassing study of the different maneuvres (columns, lines, l'ordere mixte) of the Napoleonic infantry, cavalry and artillery (see my thread on column variations !) and some thorough examples of these on the Napoleonic battlefields...
                    Also an in-depth study of the medical service in the Grande Armée is welcome...
                    So Historians...there is still alot of work to do....

                    Greets,
                    Stratego
                    There is a book out there called "The Final Act". It is about the post waterloo political situation in Europe. I really didn't enjoy the book and never finished it.
                    Avatar is General Gerard, courtesy of Zouave.

                    Churchill to Chamberlain: you had a choice between war and dishonor. You chose dishonor, and you will have war.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Surfing the web tonight I came across this Site en Francais c'est vrai...

                      http://aigleconquerant.free.fr/dico.htm

                      Sample:

                      Première bataille des Arapiles (22 juillet 1812) : Dite de Salamanque par les Anglais, la bataille des Arapiles eut lieu le 22 juillet 1812. Elle mit aux prises les 51 000 Anglo-Portugais de Wellington et les 47 000 Français de Marmont. Ce dernier est blessé et son armée mise en déroute, perdant 12 500 hommes contre 6000 chez l’adversaire. Clauzel sauve ce qui reste par une habile retraite mais Madrid et l’Andalousie doivent être évacués. Les Arapiles constituent un tournant décisif dans la guerre d’Espagne.

                      Seconde bataille des Arapiles (13 novembre 1812) : Vainqueur aux Arapiles, près de Salamanque, Wellington est entré dans Madrid. Napoléon juge indispensable de l’en déloger et ordonne à toutes les forces françaises de la péninsule Ibérique de converger sur la capitale espagnole. Prudemment, Wellington quitte Madrid et regroupe ses forces au tour de Salamanque. Supérieurs en nombre, les Français livrent une seconde bataille aux Arapiles, le 13 novembre 1812. En fâcheuse posture, menacé d’encerclement, Wellington est sauvé par un orage providentiel et par la lenteur manœuvrière de Soult. Il se replie sur Ciudad Rodrigo, aux portes du Portugal. Les deux armées prennent alors leurs quartier d’hiver.

                      Slightly different take on affairs in Espagne/Spain I think!
                      http://www.irelandinhistory.blogspot.ie/

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