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Compans to reception please, Compans to reception....

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  • Compans to reception please, Compans to reception....

    Just to show how open minded and fair The Von is... is this one any good?

    51r9L8KvKkL__SS500_.jpg

    The long toll of the brave
    Is not lost in darkness
    Over the fruitful earth
    And athwart the seas
    Hath passed the light of noble deeds
    Unquenchable forever.

  • #2
    I sla....Reviewed it a while back. It wasn't a minutiae review, just a comment or two.

    I left out that Field places Morris in both the 73rd and 71st and Macready in the 33rd and 30th and that of the so called receipt of captured colours written out a few weeks after the battle by Delort (IIRC), stating that they were captured at Waterloo

    The book is good in that there are many French first hand accounts but alas Field has written a book that would do the Napoleoniskya web-site proud

    God knows what his book on Talavera is like! Anyone read that one?


    http://www.armchairgeneral.com/forum...=12632&page=15

    Oh! My offer to discuss salient points on the tome with anyone who has read it, still stands.

    Paul
    ‘Tis said his form is tiny, yet
    All human ills he can subdue,
    Or with a bauble or medal
    Can win mans heart for you;
    And many a blessing know to stew
    To make a megloamaniac bright;
    Give honour to the dainty Corse,
    The Pixie is a little shite.

    Comment


    • #3
      Not read it Von. Looks interesting.

      Comment


      • #4
        I'm going to give it a perusal... a view from the other side of the ridge has got to be worth a punt?

        The long toll of the brave
        Is not lost in darkness
        Over the fruitful earth
        And athwart the seas
        Hath passed the light of noble deeds
        Unquenchable forever.

        Comment


        • #5
          Just took a look on Amazon and it gets excellent reviews. Damn you...thirty more bucks I can't afford. I'll have to read this thing.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Compans View Post
            Just took a look on Amazon and it gets excellent reviews. Damn you...thirty more bucks I can't afford. I'll have to read this thing.
            Gareth Glover says it all with his review.

            This review is from: Waterloo: The French Perspective )

            The premise of this book is good, looking at the battle from the French viewpoint. In a number or instances this book makes a creditable stab at presenting the French perspective. However a number of questionable theories are also pedalled with little serious critical analysis.

            Paul
            ‘Tis said his form is tiny, yet
            All human ills he can subdue,
            Or with a bauble or medal
            Can win mans heart for you;
            And many a blessing know to stew
            To make a megloamaniac bright;
            Give honour to the dainty Corse,
            The Pixie is a little shite.

            Comment


            • #7
              Looks like I'll be waiting till Crimbo for this one, I'm really looking forward to getting stuck in to it! In 'A Near Run Thing' a froggy occifer fighting at Hugomonte was convinced that the place exchanged hands twice... it'll be very interesting to see the battle from 'the other side of the ridge'.

              The long toll of the brave
              Is not lost in darkness
              Over the fruitful earth
              And athwart the seas
              Hath passed the light of noble deeds
              Unquenchable forever.

              Comment


              • #8
                You have to befware of these things, I bought a Castle Military Paperback named 'Jutland-The German Perspective', and while it was a fine book about the clash of the ironclads, it was largely told from the British side! Don't get me wrong, I liked the book, but it was a bog standard, Royal navy account, with token references to how the germans went about things on 'The Day'.
                One accurate measurement is worth a thousand expert opinions - Admiral Grace Hopper

                "The eunuch should not take pride in his chastity."
                Wu Cheng'en Monkey

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Chukka View Post
                  You have to befware of these things, I bought a Castle Military Paperback named 'Jutland-The German Perspective', and while it was a fine book about the clash of the ironclads, it was largely told from the British side! Don't get me wrong, I liked the book, but it was a bog standard, Royal navy account, with token references to how the germans went about things on 'The Day'.
                  There is no danger of that with Field's book.

                  Paul
                  ‘Tis said his form is tiny, yet
                  All human ills he can subdue,
                  Or with a bauble or medal
                  Can win mans heart for you;
                  And many a blessing know to stew
                  To make a megloamaniac bright;
                  Give honour to the dainty Corse,
                  The Pixie is a little shite.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Chukka View Post
                    You have to befware of these things, I bought a Castle Military Paperback named 'Jutland-The German Perspective', and while it was a fine book about the clash of the ironclads, it was largely told from the British side! Don't get me wrong, I liked the book, but it was a bog standard, Royal navy account, with token references to how the germans went about things on 'The Day'.
                    I've read a few reviews plus the author's motives and he has really dug deep to find and translate French accounts. My only reservation is he admits he failed 'O' level French 3 times (which I can relate to) and has translated using a dictionary and it's clearly a labour of love. He might well have translated the passages perfectly but I'm slightly wary of the self-publishing attitude of this.

                    Of course I'll buy it though

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Well I just finished this last night so thanks for the tip off.

                      Firstly I have to say that this book is definitely not for anyone reading about the battle for the first time. It's very much for the person with an intimate knowledge of the day's events and moves who wants some more insight from the other side - which I guess is what it says on the tin.

                      I found the book very interesting in parts and it does fill a much needed gap in the English-speaking world. However, Fields is not the most eloquent of writers and, as I feared in my earlier post, it does have a rather self-publishing feel to it. Although the meat of this book comes from the first hand accounts of the participants, there is little drama in Fields' writing to tie them sucessfully together and I found the flow to be a bit halting. Another complaint are the square perentheses within the quotes which are jarring and could have been dealt with by explaining things in the preceding text.

                      The really interesting stuff within this comes from the remarkable accounts by the French cavalry for example. Maybe I've let it pass me by in other tellings, but I wasn't aware that Foy's brigade made a concerted attempt to storm the French left of the allied line just after the cavalry attacks. The overall feeling one gets from the French perspective is one of muddle and disjointedness. Although there are accounts of French horse artillery pouring fire into the British squares from close range, one is left, as ever, with the question of why Foy's assault was not coordinated with the cavalry and artillery. There were no infantry to be had is the probable answer, but it's frustrating nonetheless. This is of course nothing new regarding Waterloo but very interesting to have it confirmed by the French combatants. Another feeling that consistantly comes across is of the fierceness and zeal of the French throughout the battle, despite the pointlessness of some of the actions required of them. The cavalry's bravery in the face of stalemate is incredible. Fields puts forward the theory that the cavalry was used in this way to buy some time during the lull after D'Erlon's assault which is interesting.

                      The other really important part of this book deals with the rout following the attack of the guard. Most authors tend to whitewash this as a mass breaking up of order following the guard's repulse, but evidently the process - in places at least was more gradual and I have such respect for the units who sacrificed themselves as rear guard to the fleeing army. There are several accounts from old guard veterans relating their painfully slow withdrawal in square all the way back to Genappe. The discipline was truly incredible.

                      I think this book is a must read. It's flawed and there'll probably be better books on the subject but it's very thought provoking and gave me some very fresh insight into something that's fascinated me for 40 years.
                      Last edited by Compans; 30 May 13, 13:48.

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                      • #12
                        I found the very last chapter the most interesting, a number of recollections that the author hadn't been able to work into his narrative.... a Guard Grenadier's wife killed by a cannon ball and buried at the side of the road by the Grenadier's mates, she had made seventeen campaigns. Guardsmen leaving the ranks to climb trees to watch the battle as they stood in reserve for most of the day.
                        These were brilliant to read and worth the price of the book alone.

                        The long toll of the brave
                        Is not lost in darkness
                        Over the fruitful earth
                        And athwart the seas
                        Hath passed the light of noble deeds
                        Unquenchable forever.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Von Richter View Post
                          I found the very last chapter the most interesting, a number of recollections that the author hadn't been able to work into his narrative.... a Guard Grenadier's wife killed by a cannon ball and buried at the side of the road by the Grenadier's mates, she had made seventeen campaigns. Guardsmen leaving the ranks to climb trees to watch the battle as they stood in reserve for most of the day.
                          These were brilliant to read and worth the price of the book alone.

                          The bit about the Guardsmen climbing the trees, that is a wonderful detail, the sort normally omitted from battlefield accounts.
                          Last edited by Smishkun; 02 Jun 13, 14:18. Reason: Spelling

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