Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

French Tambour Majors

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • French Tambour Majors

    There was an excellent print posted of a French tambour major swinging his mace in combat on the uniform page. It is an excellent print and brought to mind two instances that I can recall of tambour majors in combat:

    The first is at Dresden in 1813 where a veteran Guard drum major led an attack with about fifty Young Guardsmen whose officers were all down to retake one of the French redoubts that the allies had taken.

    The second was at Waterloo where the two-battalion Old Guard assault against Plancenoit (from which the Young Guard had just been ejected by the Prussians) was led by a Guard drum major using his mace as a weapon (it had a loaded head and was sturdy and massive enough to make an excellent club). The two battalions drove the Prussians out of the village but had to withdraw into the village against Prussian artillery fire. It is an interesting episode as the two Guard battalions faced fourteen Prussian battalions.

    Sincerely,
    M
    We are not now that strength which in old days
    Moved earth and heaven; that which we are we are; One equal temper of heroic hearts
    Made weak by time and fate but strong in will
    To strive to seek to find and not to yield.

  • #2
    There was an excellent print posted of a French tambour major swinging his mace in combat on the uniform page
    This one ?

    "To hell wars Grudges and parties ! As our fathers Sing in real friends, The clink of glasses Roses and lilies. The clink of glasses Roses and lilies."

    Comment


    • #3
      Yes. Imagine getting hit in the head with the weighted head of the mace? Even wearing your headgear would definitely ring your bell if it didn't crack your skull.

      It should be remembered that the drum major was a combat soldier and not a mere gagiste. His rank was somewhere between the senior NCO and an officer and he was a respected man in his regiment.

      Sincerely,
      M
      We are not now that strength which in old days
      Moved earth and heaven; that which we are we are; One equal temper of heroic hearts
      Made weak by time and fate but strong in will
      To strive to seek to find and not to yield.

      Comment


      • #4
        [...]would definitely ring your bell if it didn't crack your skull.
        Indeed. Some modern musics make me feel this way.


        1815 Major-tambour' s canne



        Source: "Musée de l' infanterie"


        Look like some medieval "masse d' arme".
        "To hell wars Grudges and parties ! As our fathers Sing in real friends, The clink of glasses Roses and lilies. The clink of glasses Roses and lilies."

        Comment


        • #5
          Yes, it does-and the head was loaded with lead...

          Sincerely,
          M
          We are not now that strength which in old days
          Moved earth and heaven; that which we are we are; One equal temper of heroic hearts
          Made weak by time and fate but strong in will
          To strive to seek to find and not to yield.

          Comment


          • #6
            Hey I'm glad someone caught the theme of the image I posted. I personally find it really interesting topic. The cane is pretty heavy and everytime I see our tambormajors swinging with it during marching and playing, it makes me feel uncomfortable when someone gets too close!

            Do you have the second picture you named by any chance?
            Thank you.
            Qui a composé la chanson ?
            C'est un tambour du bataillon.
            Un soir d‘été, en battant la retraite,
            Pensant à sa mie, que toujours il regrette.

            ...

            Comment


            • #7
              The print posted here by VieuxChat was made by Charles Vernier in 1852. Thanks, Cath.

              A few more Tambour-Majors for you guys...


              81st French Line Infantry Regiment




              6th French Foot Artillery Regiment




              15th French Light Infantry Regiment 1809




              Tambour battant la charge by Auguste Raffet



              Original ink and watercolor drawing (c. 1830); tambour-major and 2 drummers on crest of hill in battle, wounded or dead soldiers on ground nearby.
              My avatar: Center of the Cross of the Légion d'honneur (Legion of Honour) of the First French Empire (Napoleonic Era), 3rd type (awarded between 1806-1808). My Légion d'honneur. :-)

              Comment


              • #8
                I forgot to post the source of the images.

                http://library.brown.edu/cds/catalog...=13&type=basic
                My avatar: Center of the Cross of the Légion d'honneur (Legion of Honour) of the First French Empire (Napoleonic Era), 3rd type (awarded between 1806-1808). My Légion d'honneur. :-)

                Comment

                Latest Topics

                Collapse

                • Karri
                  Prawn heads
                  by Karri
                  How do you cook them? How do you eat them?

                  So far I've always just twisted them off, and discarded it along with the shells and such, only...
                  Today, 11:40
                • Jose50
                  Thoughts on the US abandoning NATO
                  by Jose50
                  Now may be a good time for the NATO countries to start beefing up their materiel, personnel and alliances. There is a decided wave here in the US that...
                  Today, 08:41
                • Von Richter
                  Sagittarius Rising...
                  by Von Richter
                  Just having a re-read of this book after it's stood for donkey's years on the bookshelf. Once again, within the first couple of pages, I'm transported...
                  Today, 01:19
                Working...
                X