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  • These are the type you need

    http://www.perry-miniatures.com/prod...oducts_id=1970





    1812 Bardin Habit Veste



    1806-1810 Habit Veste

    Paul
    Last edited by Dibble201Bty; 28 Nov 13, 16:16.
    ‘Tis said his form is tiny, yet
    All human ills he can subdue,
    Or with a bauble or medal
    Can win mans heart for you;
    And many a blessing know to stew
    To make a megloamaniac bright;
    Give honour to the dainty Corse,
    The Pixie is a little shite.

    Comment


    • Here is the two companies Fr. line infantry side by side...

      Comment









      • Paul
        ‘Tis said his form is tiny, yet
        All human ills he can subdue,
        Or with a bauble or medal
        Can win mans heart for you;
        And many a blessing know to stew
        To make a megloamaniac bright;
        Give honour to the dainty Corse,
        The Pixie is a little shite.

        Comment


        • Thanks a lot for your help!

          So, if I get it, the main difference is the coat, right?
          "Every man thinks meanly of himself for not having been a soldier" - Samuel Johnson

          "Kerls, wollt ihr denn ewig leben?"

          Comment


          • The pompoms on the shakoes were different as well...

            Comment


            • I have a question about the tack of Hungarian Hussars. Were the red saddle cloths put outside or under the saddles?

              We were watching The Gypsy Baron tonight, an operetta by Johann Strauss II from 1885, a staging from the 1980s starring Siegfried Jerusalem and shot on location with quite a bit of equine participation (to say nothing of the oxen).

              Three characters give up on the complexities of life and go off to join the Hussars, who are recruiting for presumably the War of the Spanish Succession. When they return victorious to Vienna, the troop of Hussars is clearly riding with the red fitted saddle cloths outside the saddles: they are sitting on them. The cloths are large and have longer tails in the back.

              I have spent my life with horses and this seemed wrong to me; at least here we don't normally ride with the saddle cloths on top --- I would think it would be slippery, and also, the function of a saddle cloth is to prevent saddle galling of the horse, generally.

              I googled the images and the opera seemed quite careful about the costumes, including the frogging down the fronts of the uniform legs, so I would think this horse cloth placement may be accurate. But images from all ages show both: sometimes the saddle is clearly on top of the blanket, sometimes it is not clear, and the bottom picture below, from 1760, plainly shows what my operetta also showed. Does anyone know what is going on with the wandering saddle cloths? When and why did they put the cloths on top of the saddles? This seems odd to me.

              Comment


              • Originally posted by Phebe View Post
                I have a question about the tack of Hungarian Hussars. Were the red saddle cloths put outside or under the saddles?

                We were watching The Gypsy Baron tonight, an operetta by Johann Strauss II from 1885, a staging from the 1980s starring Siegfried Jerusalem and shot on location with quite a bit of equine participation (to say nothing of the oxen).

                Three characters give up on the complexities of life and go off to join the Hussars, who are recruiting for presumably the War of the Spanish Succession. When they return victorious to Vienna, the troop of Hussars is clearly riding with the red fitted saddle cloths outside the saddles: they are sitting on them. The cloths are large and have longer tails in the back.

                I have spent my life with horses and this seemed wrong to me; at least here we don't normally ride with the saddle cloths on top --- I would think it would be slippery, and also, the function of a saddle cloth is to prevent saddle galling of the horse, generally.

                I googled the images and the opera seemed quite careful about the costumes, including the frogging down the fronts of the uniform legs, so I would think this horse cloth placement may be accurate. But images from all ages show both: sometimes the saddle is clearly on top of the blanket, sometimes it is not clear, and the bottom picture below, from 1760, plainly shows what my operetta also showed. Does anyone know what is going on with the wandering saddle cloths? When and why did they put the cloths on top of the saddles? This seems odd to me.

                Go to the site below and click on all the links

                http://theminiaturespage.com/boards/msg.mv?id=252214

                Paul
                ‘Tis said his form is tiny, yet
                All human ills he can subdue,
                Or with a bauble or medal
                Can win mans heart for you;
                And many a blessing know to stew
                To make a megloamaniac bright;
                Give honour to the dainty Corse,
                The Pixie is a little shite.

                Comment


                • Originally posted by General Brock View Post
                  The pompoms on the shakoes were different as well...
                  ok. one more question concerning the Grenadiers. In 1808-09 he is depicted with a bearskin cap, in 1812 with a shako. Did that change too?
                  "Every man thinks meanly of himself for not having been a soldier" - Samuel Johnson

                  "Kerls, wollt ihr denn ewig leben?"

                  Comment


                  • Originally posted by rogg View Post
                    ok. one more question concerning the Grenadiers. In 1808-09 he is depicted with a bearskin cap, in 1812 with a shako. Did that change too?
                    Ill give you all the Info you need in just as soon as I have scanned my Rousselot Plates and Info.

                    Paul
                    ‘Tis said his form is tiny, yet
                    All human ills he can subdue,
                    Or with a bauble or medal
                    Can win mans heart for you;
                    And many a blessing know to stew
                    To make a megloamaniac bright;
                    Give honour to the dainty Corse,
                    The Pixie is a little shite.

                    Comment


                    • Grenadiers and Voltigeurs 1804 - 1813








                      ****************************************
                      Infantry of the Line 1813 - 1814








                      Paul
                      ‘Tis said his form is tiny, yet
                      All human ills he can subdue,
                      Or with a bauble or medal
                      Can win mans heart for you;
                      And many a blessing know to stew
                      To make a megloamaniac bright;
                      Give honour to the dainty Corse,
                      The Pixie is a little shite.

                      Comment


                      • Thanks!! Sry, I can't rep you at the moment!

                        Is it this book?

                        http://www.amazon.de/Napoleons-Armee...usselot+Plates

                        (in German )
                        "Every man thinks meanly of himself for not having been a soldier" - Samuel Johnson

                        "Kerls, wollt ihr denn ewig leben?"

                        Comment


                        • One other thing I've found out, purely on the figure side of 28mm... Victrix bayonets are a lot easier snapped off occidentally than Perry ones. I'm guessing this is because Victrix are truer to scale, but that's not much good when they're strewn all over the wargames table!

                          The long toll of the brave
                          Is not lost in darkness
                          Over the fruitful earth
                          And athwart the seas
                          Hath passed the light of noble deeds
                          Unquenchable forever.

                          Comment


                          • Originally posted by Von Richter View Post
                            One other thing I've found out, purely on the figure side of 28mm... Victrix bayonets are a lot easier snapped off occidentally than Perry ones. I'm guessing this is because Victrix are truer to scale, but that's not much good when they're strewn all over the wargames table!



                            This is probably the result of another war profiteer in Paris, selling rubbish to the army and earning thereby a fortune
                            "Every man thinks meanly of himself for not having been a soldier" - Samuel Johnson

                            "Kerls, wollt ihr denn ewig leben?"

                            Comment


                            • Originally posted by rogg View Post
                              Thanks!! Sry, I can't rep you at the moment!

                              Is it this book?

                              http://www.amazon.de/Napoleons-Armee...usselot+Plates

                              (in German )
                              I have the book and a good, but not complete collection of the plates. I much prefer the plates as while they are larger than the usual book, and certainly larger than in the book itself, they are easy to use and having the complete write-up from Rousselot is much better than what you get with the book.

                              I would recommend the book for a good starting point, but if you can get the plates for your collection. Most of the ones I have I found for $15.00 a piece, but they are definitely worth the expense. On Military Matters has a selection of them, but not all, but that would be a good starting point.

                              Sincerely,
                              M
                              We are not now that strength which in old days
                              Moved earth and heaven; that which we are we are; One equal temper of heroic hearts
                              Made weak by time and fate but strong in will
                              To strive to seek to find and not to yield.

                              Comment


                              • Originally posted by Massena View Post
                                I have the book and a good, but not complete collection of the plates. I much prefer the plates as while they are larger than the usual book, and certainly larger than in the book itself, they are easy to use and having the complete write-up from Rousselot is much better than what you get with the book.

                                I would recommend the book for a good starting point, but if you can get the plates for your collection. Most of the ones I have I found for $15.00 a piece, but they are definitely worth the expense. On Military Matters has a selection of them, but not all, but that would be a good starting point.

                                Sincerely,
                                M
                                Thanks, why did they abolish the bearskin for the Grenadiers?
                                "Every man thinks meanly of himself for not having been a soldier" - Samuel Johnson

                                "Kerls, wollt ihr denn ewig leben?"

                                Comment

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