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  • B17-Bf109

    Some will know this painting and the story. Hope to be its owner soon.

    http://www.armchairgeneral.com/forum...pictureid=2258





    “Attack with aggression, but always have a plan of retreat”

  • #2
    It's turned up before, supposedly depicting a real event where the Bf 109 escorted the crippled B-17 to safety.
    Indyref2 - still, "Yes."

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    • #3
      well, with the white tail he is obviously a group leader, but cant see enough of the 109 to make a guess as to who owns it..?

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      • #4
        Originally posted by wellsfargo View Post
        Some will know this painting and the story. Hope to be its owner soon.

        http://www.armchairgeneral.com/forum...pictureid=2258





        “Attack with aggression, but always have a plan of retreat”
        I like and I envy!!
        'By Horse by Tram'.


        I was in when they needed 'em,not feeded 'em.
        " Youuu 'Orrible Lot!"

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        • #5
          Originally posted by galland View Post
          well, with the white tail he is obviously a group leader, but cant see enough of the 109 to make a guess as to who owns it..?
          B-17 "Ye Olde Pub", its pilot Charles "Charlie" Brown, and Bf109 Luftwaffe Ace Franz Stigler
          I belive that Franz stigler, reported downing the B17 over th North Sea. The B17 on landing back in England the USAAF inforced security on the mission.

          The painting is "A Higher Call" by John Shaw. From Aviation Art Hangar. www.aviationarthangar.com





          Attack with aggression, but always have a plan of retreat”

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          • #6
            Good post.... I never heard of this story. I knew that there were some acts of gallentry performed by both side during the war, and I still like to hear of them...

            Any more?
            In Vino Veritas

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            • #7
              Originally posted by dongar1 View Post
              Good post.... I never heard of this story. I knew that there were some acts of gallentry performed by both side during the war, and I still like to hear of them...

              Any more?
              dongar1
              The story as I know it
              I belive there is a book?
              Background: Charlie Brown was a B-17 Flying Fortress pilot with the 379th Bomber Group at Kimbolton, England. His B-17 was called ‘Ye Old Pub’ and was in a terrible state, having been hit by flak and fighters. The compass was damaged and they were flying deeper over enemy territory instead of heading home to Kimbolton.

              After flying the B-17 over an enemy airfield, a German pilot named Franz Steigler was ordered to take off and shoot down the B-17. When he got near the B-17, he could not believe his eyes. In his words, he ‘had never seen a plane in such a bad state’. The tail and rear section was severely damaged, and the tail gunner wounded. The top gunner was all over the top of the fuselage. The nose was smashed and there were holes everywhere.

              Despite having ammunition, Franz flew to the side of the B-17 and looked at Charlie Brown, the pilot. Brown was scared and struggling to control his damaged and blood-stained plane.

              Aware that they had no idea where they were going, Franz waved at Charlie to turn 180 degrees. Franz escorted and guided the stricken plane to, and slightly over, the North Sea towards England. He then saluted Charlie Brown and turned away, back to Europe. When Franz landed he told the CO that the plane had been shot down over the sea, and never told the truth to anybody. Charlie Brown and the remains of his crew told all at their briefing, but were ordered never to talk about it.

              After years of research, Franz was found. He had never talked about the incident, not even at post-war reunions.

              They met in the USA at a 379th Bomber Group reunion, together with 25 people who are alive now – all because Franz never fired his guns that day.

              When asked why he didn’t shoot them down Stigler later said, “I didn’t have the heart to finish those brave men. I flew beside them for a long time. They were trying desperately to get home and I was going to let them do that. I could not have shot at them. It would have been the same as shooting at a man in a parachute”.



              “Attack with aggression, but always have a plan of retreat”

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              • #8
                Very interesting story.
                My Paintings at

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                • #9
                  Integrity in War a rare sight to see.
                  Freedom is not Free it has cost millions of lives to obtain it and to hold on to it will cost even more lives of the willing and the brave!!

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                  • #10
                    ..another amazing little story to come out of the war,...he must be a lucky charm that German pilot, the rest of teh B-17 crew made it throught he rest of the war apparently...

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