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. . .AND Allied Forces - ANZACS

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  • lcm1
    replied
    Originally posted by Half Pint John View Post
    It was hard to miss. I guerss the eyes arn't that old after all.

    HP
    Such questions leave me with no alternative,for old times sake I have got to say,......Who? lcm1

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  • Merkava188
    replied
    Some of these are pretty good.Especially the one froms Vietnam,Enduring Freedon,and Iraqi Freedom.

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    French Foreign Legion - where are they now?

    These guys do get around - nowadays in (French) New Caledonia.



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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    The origins of the ANZACs

    Frank Hurley was a famous war photographer - spanning two war zones
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frank_Hurley). He became the official Australian photographer on the Western Front and in Palestine in 1917-1918.

    This is one sample of his early colour photographs:



    He used the new Paget process of colour technology to great effect - showing the carpet of anenomes (poppies) to suggest the bloodshed of war. During this time it was also traditional to pick the battlefield flowers in memory of those killed - a symbol of commemoration and remembrance.

    Prior to this, he made two famous expeditions to record Mawson's and Shackleton Antarctic expeditions (1911-1916). He had to discard many valuable glass negatives in order to trek to safety after Shackleton's ship ENDURANCE was destroyed http://image.sl.nsw.gov.au/cgi-bin/e...a090;thumbs=1)

    Hurley’s magnesium flare-lit photograph of the ghostly Endurance, ‘ a spectre ship set in a world of rime crystals,’ remains one of the most dramatic photographic images of all time.

    Hurley also covered World War II (1939-1945).

    He later photographed Tasmania's Frenchmans Cap forest, mountain and lake scenery, in startling 10" x 8" photographs, the equal to Ansel Adams' images.

    He died in the early '60s - but Frank Hurley was remembered briefly (1995-2000) with the annual photographic Hurley Awards, given out to regional newspaper photographers by Queensland's Griffith University Photography Department. His twin daughters presented the awards - in the shape of an iceberg. However lack of funding prevented continuation of the Awards.

    www.nla.gov.au/catalogue/pictures/
    Last edited by Dark Castor; 13 Jun 08, 01:27.

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Mai husband and I would like to bestow these medals . .

    Until the introduction of an Australian honours system - introduced in 1975 - Australians were awarded British honours.

    But once a year, Australia doffs it's cap, as the recipient of "The Queen's Birthday Honours List", which distributes Honours and Awards (both military and civilian) to worthy colonials - at the recommendation of the government, which is then approved by the Queen.

    The recipients of awards in the Australian honours system are published twice a year - on Australia Day and on the Queen's Birthday.

    About a week or so ago, 81 members of the Australian Defence organisation were recognised in the Queen’s Birthday 2008 honours.

    Although Australian military forces have continuously served alongside UN and US (and seldom British) forces, in nearly all of the world's trouble spots, there is still a reluctance to accept "foreign awards".

    So, here are SOME of the current awards distributed to the colonials, approved by the Queen of England.






    Vive la Republic - "a resident for president".

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  • greyghost
    replied
    I always liked this shot of a machine gun position (overlooking the Warburtons) on the top of SAS hill at NUI DAT.
    Attached Files

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    HUEY / Fighter pilots

    Those Kiwis - no respect for Aussies - or fighter pilots.

    New Zealand helicopter pilot, Tim Costley, flies a Huey for the NZ Air Force - and has written a song (JET PILOT), and made a video clip, that's been seen 120,000 times since being posted 2 months ago:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1BzU1sYPjzo

    While training in Australia, Australian fighter pilots asked him to write a song about them. He said it was more a documentary than a song.
    "It's all satirical - there's always been plenty of banter between Huey and jet pilots. Unfortunately for them, we're better looking and much smarter."

    When posted to East Timor, he decided to make a video to go with the song, to feature during the 3 Squadron "Academy Awards" night.

    He has now made JET PILOT available on Apple's iTunes music store - and set up a Facebook page under his new band name AIRTIME.

    He's hoping internet sales will recover the $35 it cost to make the video - he's getting about 30cents of the $1.79 fans pay to download the song.

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  • Half Pint John
    replied
    Originally posted by Dark Castor View Post


    Well spotted HP - thought I'd wait and see if anyone saw the significance.

    A hundred years later, the Aussies are once more immersed in poppies.

    It was hard to miss. I guerss the eyes arn't that old after all.

    HP

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  • Half Pint John
    replied
    The poppy is used in the US in the same manner. Usually sold by the American Legion or Veterans of Foreign Wars. Blue ones are also sold to support disabled Vets. Both the Red and the Blue are made by disabled Vets.

    HP

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Of course we have a Canadian to thank:



    # Millions of Canadians wear the Royal Canadian Legion’s lapel Poppy each November, to keep alive Canadians' memories of 117,000 of their countrymen who died in battle.

    # Australians in the same way also honour their WW I Diggers lost on the Western Front.

    # The poem was first published on 8 December 1915 in England, appearing in “Punch” magazine.

    # The association of the Poppy to those who had been killed in war has existed since the Napoleonic Wars in the 19th century, over 110 years before being adopted in Canada. There exists a record from that time of how thickly Poppies grew over the graves of soldiers in the area of Flanders, France - fields that were barren before the battles exploded with the blood-red flowers after the fighting ended.

    Just prior to the First World War, few Poppies grew in Flanders. During the tremendous bombardments of that war, the chalk soils became rich in lime from rubble, allowing “popaver rhoes” to thrive. When the war ended, the lime was quickly absorbed and the Poppy began to disappear again.

    # Mort Shuman (American singer, pianist and songwriter, co-writer of 1960s rock and roll hits, including "Viva Las Vegas".) uses lines from the poem in his translation of the song "Marieke" by Jacques Brel, the Belgian composer.

    # George Orwell's novel Nineteen Eighty-Four contains the phrase "We are the dead", alluding to McCrae's poem. It is quoted by the novel's main character, Winston Smith.

    # In the TV special "What Have We Learned, Charlie Brown?", Linus recites the poem while standing in front of the remains of WWI.

    # An episode of The Simpsons parodies the title with "When Flanders Failed".

    # In Flanders Fields, a musical interpretation by award winning Canadian songwriter Jon Brooks, was released on May 3, 2007
    http://www.jonbrooks.ca/

    # LIBERIA / St. Philips Choir / Angel Voices
    Most of Libera's lyrics come from traditional hymns, the Latin Rite liturgy, and contemporary songs by artists ranging from Brian Wilson to Enya. However, lyrics from various poems and original lyrics are also used. For example, "We are the Lost" uses the poems "In Flanders Fields" by John McCrae and "For the Fallen" by Laurence Binyon.

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Well spotted, HP



    Well spotted HP - thought I'd wait and see if anyone saw the significance.

    A hundred years later, the Aussies are once more immersed in poppies.

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  • Half Pint John
    replied
    Originally posted by Dark Castor View Post



    (Image courtesy of and © Aust Dept of Defence)
    In Flanders Fields
    by John McCrae, May 1915

    In Flanders fields the poppies blow
    Between the crosses, row on row,
    That mark our place; and in the sky
    The larks, still bravely singing, fly
    Scarce heard amid the guns below.

    We are the Dead. Short days ago
    We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow,
    Loved and were loved, and now we lie
    In Flanders fields.

    Take up our quarrel with the foe:
    To you from failing hands we throw
    The torch; be yours to hold it high.
    If ye break faith with us who die
    We shall not sleep,
    though poppies grow
    In Flanders fields.


    HP

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied

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  • Half Pint John
    replied
    Originally posted by Dark Castor View Post
    Unusual angle - normally not the safest place to be with a camera:

    Greyghost's image (above):- 'kiwis infantry2'


    all depends on the distance. As long as the troops are still loading.........not such a big deal.

    HP

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Unusual angle - normally not the safest place to be with a camera:

    Greyghost's image (above):- 'kiwis infantry2'

    Last edited by Dark Castor; 31 May 08, 04:17.

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