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What exactly makes the new Isreali battle dressing superior???

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  • What exactly makes the new Isreali battle dressing superior???

    Anybody know, what makes the fastly becoming the NATO standard, originally developed by the Israeli army, that somehow just does things that your ordinary pressure pad didnt do...

    Anybody got an idea how this works, and how it can be improvised...

    I still remember back in the 70s, when the prevailing idea was to tie one of those things with a branch and prevent blood from getting to the wound(s)....

    But, then it was figured out that there was much more probablility of what I translate directly from Finnish as 'Instant Gangrene'...

    So, they went for the pressure pad instead...

    But now, I hear the Isreali battle dressing is and has saved many lives...

    Any info???

    MR Poundr.
    "SI VIS PACEM, PARA BELLUM" - " If you want peace, prepare for war".

    If acted upon in time, ww2 could have been stopped without a single bullet being fired. - Sir Winston Churchill

  • #2
    Not sure, but the Israelis have used a bandage that incorporates some blood clotting properties. There is a US company that makes the stuff and there are OTS products for sales.



    http://www.actiongear.com/cgi-bin/ta...Fresults%2Etam

    The QuickClot and similar products have to be used carefully. There have been reports of patients have been treated with that developing blood clots, strokes, other coronary issues because the blood has gotten too thick. QC should only be used if there is an issue stopping the bleeding with a pressure dressing.

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    • #3
      Wow, I wasn't aware there was such a technology as blood-clotting bandages.
      http://www.militarywargaming.com

      "The Golden Rule of War, Speed - Simplicity - Boldness" -- General George S. Patton, Jr

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by RetPara View Post
        Not sure, but the Israelis have used a bandage that incorporates some blood clotting properties. There is a US company that makes the stuff and there are OTS products for sales.



        http://www.actiongear.com/cgi-bin/ta...Fresults%2Etam

        The QuickClot and similar products have to be used carefully. There have been reports of patients have been treated with that developing blood clots, strokes, other coronary issues because the blood has gotten too thick. QC should only be used if there is an issue stopping the bleeding with a pressure dressing.
        Interesting, we often get into the military tech of the destruction side of things, but arent intersted about the other side of the coin, the caring of ever increasingly heavy duty wounds...

        Thanks.
        "SI VIS PACEM, PARA BELLUM" - " If you want peace, prepare for war".

        If acted upon in time, ww2 could have been stopped without a single bullet being fired. - Sir Winston Churchill

        Comment


        • #5
          Hi guys-
          Israeli dressings have maybe 3 distinct advantages over the traditional field dressing. First off, though, they do NOT have a blood clotting treatment applied. At least not the ones I have been issued.
          First- instead of having 2 muslin tails that need to be wrapped in opposite directions to affix the bandage, the israeli has 1 tail that is elastic, and can be applied much like an ace bandage, roller style, so you can hold the dressing pad in place with one hand and wrap with the other. MUCH better than having to juggle multiple tails that are flopping around and so on.
          Second- The tail of the dressing incorporates a plastic locking bar, which serves as an anchor point for the wrapping. By looping the tail through the locking bar and pulling tension, a VERY effective pressure dressing is created. Without the need to scrounge cravats, sticks, and stuff.
          Third- Instead of having to tie off the tails with a square knot, the end is fastened with a velcro fastener.

          So all-in-all it is really a souped-up, faster, simpler pressure dressing.

          Hem-con dressings are treated with Chitosan, which is extracted from shrimp shells, I believe. Chitosan has great hemostatic properties, and the Hem-con dressing can be used in conjunction with the israeli.

          Quick Clot was a flash-in-the-pan. It seemed to be the answer to the "Black Hawk Down" syndrome such as a severed femoral artery in the inguinal region, where pressure and tourniquets are not useful. Unfortunately, Quick-Clot was used in circumstances where it was not really appropriate- such as wounds where a good hemostatic dressing (see above) would have worked. Remeber the scene from "The Shooter"? Right-WRONG! Soooo, some guys were coming into the CSH with what should have been minor flesh wounds, but due to the heat generated by the Quick-Clot, the wounds were now also badly burned and much worse off than they needed to be. I have not personally been informed of strokes, etc., but would not be surprised. I have heard of people being blinded by the powder, being blown into their eyes or into the patient's eyes while applying the stuff. We have been ordered to remove it from our aid bags.

          Comment


          • #6
            They recently did a mil chem briefing up here at USMA. In it, they talked about a wide variety of new and exciting uses of chemistry. One of the chemicals acted almost like the stuff in baby's diapers. Apply it to a cut artery, mix it with your hands in the wound, and it clots in a few moments. All you have to do now is sew up the wound. No burning like quick clot, or problems around eyes. I can't rember what it is called or when it will be available though.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Larkin View Post
              They recently did a mil chem briefing up here at USMA. In it, they talked about a wide variety of new and exciting uses of chemistry. One of the chemicals acted almost like the stuff in baby's diapers. Apply it to a cut artery, mix it with your hands in the wound, and it clots in a few moments. All you have to do now is sew up the wound. No burning like quick clot, or problems around eyes. I can't rember what it is called or when it will be available though.
              That is an interesting concept! I believe the stuff in baby diapers is also sold as Terrasorb, and it is a polysaccharide gel that is amazingly hygrosopic, non-reactive and nontoxic. It can absorb 100 to 200 x its weight in water. That would effectively concentrate natural blood clotting agents at the wound site by absorbing the water fraction of the blood. The stuff has been used in the garden industry for water management, as well as in baby diapers for years.

              It's these seemingly amazingly obvious ideas like this that are the mark of truely creative and inventive people! (Of which I am NOT one!) You can imagine the surgeon in the operating room at the Eureka moment, " Now my wife has this stuff in the garden shed.......why not give it a whirl?", Or, " If only I had a Pampers, I could stop this bleeding!"

              Cool info, Larkin, Thanks!

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              • #8
                The change in military medical thinking in Canada has gone 180 in the last few years. Medics and the avverage soldier is now taught that in the case of injury to a limb the first thing to do is apply a tourniquet. In addition carrying field dressing soldiers now carry a tourniquet. Four years ago the military did not teach tourniquets at all as part of first aid.
                I have read Canadian medic have a clotting compound but what it is I do not know.

                Largely since early 1960's the governments has ignored the Canadian Military unless it was to reduce the budget, however since 9/11 everything has changed. The current government is almost like Santa Claus. The transformation the Canadian Armed Forces is the biggest since Unification in 1968 (the Army, Air Force and Navy were combined in one service then). Unlike Unification the current transformation is having a positive effect. Procurment as gone from 20 years for a new system to in some cases 1 year for major equipment. No longer does Canada investage how other countries solve issues and then file the report for lack of money or will but now impliments the best solutions
                FoxNEWS "The World is unfair and we are running scared"

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                • #9
                  Quick-Clot follies

                  Originally posted by jthomas View Post
                  Hi guys-
                  Quick Clot was a flash-in-the-pan. It seemed to be the answer to the "Black Hawk Down" syndrome such as a severed femoral artery in the inguinal region, where pressure and tourniquets are not useful. Unfortunately, Quick-Clot was used in circumstances where it was not really appropriate- such as wounds where a good hemostatic dressing (see above) would have worked. Remeber the scene from "The Shooter"? Right-WRONG! Soooo, some guys were coming into the CSH with what should have been minor flesh wounds, but due to the heat generated by the Quick-Clot, the wounds were now also badly burned and much worse off than they needed to be. I have not personally been informed of strokes, etc., but would not be surprised. I have heard of people being blinded by the powder, being blown into their eyes or into the patient's eyes while applying the stuff. We have been ordered to remove it from our aid bags.
                  There was a video that has been floated out in the interweb of "The Blackhawk Down Model - Quick-Clot Trial". This is a video of a pig's femoral artery being severed and then cleaned up with Quick-Clot. The funny thing is... The wound is constantly being mechanically suctioned and also blotted dry by surgical staff.

                  In sumation: What kind of battlefield did they have in mind when selling this stuff to the military/us soldiers?

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by 17poundr View Post
                    Anybody know, what makes the fastly becoming the NATO standard, originally developed by the Israeli army, that somehow just does things that your ordinary pressure pad didnt do...

                    Anybody got an idea how this works, and how it can be improvised...

                    I still remember back in the 70s, when the prevailing idea was to tie one of those things with a branch and prevent blood from getting to the wound(s)....

                    But, then it was figured out that there was much more probablility of what I translate directly from Finnish as 'Instant Gangrene'...

                    So, they went for the pressure pad instead...

                    But now, I hear the Isreali battle dressing is and has saved many lives...

                    Any info???

                    MR Poundr.
                    The thing I liked most about the Israeli Dressing was the length of bandage you could get out of the thing. (Funny side note: We did not call it the "Israeli" Dressing in Iraq - that name was not exactly kosher with them.) The size of the dressing was somewhere between the old field dressing and the old abdominal dressing. And the material (comparable to the standard Ace-wrap) afforded a lot more coverage when dressing a thigh or chest.

                    Comment

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