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Long-Term Effects of Blast Exposures (2014)

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  • Long-Term Effects of Blast Exposures (2014)

    Another medical study from the Gulf War.

    Free download at - http://www.nap.edu/openbook.php?record_id=18253

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    Any metaphor will tear if stretched over too much reality.

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  • #2
    A quick skim revealed no suprises. I expect there is so data in there that may be use for the medical folks. Dealing with vets in trouble I'm now very curious about mental health and the effects of combat injury.

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    • #3
      I got blown up a few times and it never both- both- bothered me.
      Hyperwar: World War II on the World Wide Web
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      The best place in the world to "work".

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Carl Schwamberg View Post
        A quick skim revealed no suprises. I expect there is so data in there that may be use for the medical folks. Dealing with vets in trouble I'm now very curious about mental health and the effects of combat injury.
        We have enough medics on ACG that I thought this might be of interest. I certainly don't expect this to be the hottest thread in town.
        Any metaphor will tear if stretched over too much reality.

        Questions about our site? See the FAQ.

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        • #5
          Yeah, obviously that stutter is a residual childhood thing

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          • #6
            here is an interesting read
            http://depts.washington.edu/meddev/u...in-wartime.php

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            • #7
              I've heard of it before, and I can't help but wondered about WW1 veterans, who endured shelling that was unlike anything seen since, in terms of number of rounds and frequency.
              Any man can hold his place when the bands play and women throw flowers; it is when the enemy presses close and metal shears through the ranks that one can acertain which are soldiers, and which are not.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Arnold J Rimmer View Post
                I've heard of it before, and I can't help but wondered about WW1 veterans, who endured shelling that was unlike anything seen since, in terms of number of rounds and frequency.
                Hi AJR

                Its a very valid observation and I would imagine WW2 vets are far ahead of today's vets in terms of exposure!

                Regards
                "You have enemies? Good. That means you've stood up for something, sometime in your life." Churchill

                "I'm no reactionary.Christ on the Mountain! I'm as idealistic as Hell" Eisenhower

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by ole timer View Post
                  As for objective evidence to indicate that repeated blast exposure and mild traumatic brain injury causes brain changes in those vets? There hasn’t been any. Until this summer. “We now have brain imaging evidence that there are both functional and structural changes in the brain in these veterans,” says Peskind.
                  In short, the study's results are useless anecdotal evidence. That isn't to minimize the necessity of such studies or the potential damage blast can do to someone, but in this case it seems the results are more about building a case on what is essentially rumor, that blast has serious effects on people long term.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Andy H View Post
                    Hi AJR

                    Its a very valid observation and I would imagine WW2 vets are far ahead of today's vets in terms of exposure!

                    Regards
                    Yes, and latter portion Korean vets of various nations who fought trench warfare.

                    USMC units on the DMZ took a heavy pounding from 130mm guns, too.

                    Not to minimize today's veterans, but in previous wars the troops took a lot more and a lot more often with at best a metal helmet for protection.
                    Any man can hold his place when the bands play and women throw flowers; it is when the enemy presses close and metal shears through the ranks that one can acertain which are soldiers, and which are not.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Arnold J Rimmer View Post
                      Yes, and latter portion Korean vets of various nations who fought trench warfare.

                      USMC units on the DMZ took a heavy pounding from 130mm guns, too.

                      Not to minimize today's veterans, but in previous wars the troops took a lot more and a lot more often with at best a metal helmet for protection.
                      Yes, not to mention sticking your hands over your ears (if they were not busy doing something else!! There is a long list of WW2 jobs which were in direct contact with ear damaging noise without any protection OFFICIALLY issued to protect the ears! You talk to stokers from the old battleships and you will not find many that are not very deaf and wearing some sort of hearing aid, Gunners, tank crews!! You name it! The powers that be preferred to save a few bucks bugger the poor sods hearing!! lcm1
                      'By Horse by Tram'.


                      I was in when they needed 'em,not feeded 'em.
                      " Youuu 'Orrible Lot!"

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Arnold J Rimmer View Post
                        I've heard of it before, and I can't help but wondered about WW1 veterans, who endured shelling that was unlike anything seen since, in terms of number of rounds and frequency.
                        I've wondered about that also.

                        Compared to men of the same age who did not suffer trough heavy bombardments in the trenches did the vets have higher rates of various neurological problems ?

                        The argument has been made that many soldiers and marines wounded by IEDs suffered injuries that would have killed them in prior conflicts. But due to body armor, armored vehicles and improved medical care they survived. But were exposed to very significant overpressure from the bomb.
                        "I disapprove of what you say, but I will defend to the death your right to say it" Beatrice Evelyn Hall
                        Updated for the 21st century... except if you are criticizing islam, that scares the $hii+e out of me!

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                        • #13
                          https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Heal...cts_from_noise
                          We hunt the hunters

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