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IED Shockwaves Inject Hidden Damage in Troops, Study Claims

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  • IED Shockwaves Inject Hidden Damage in Troops, Study Claims

    IED Shockwaves Inject Hidden Damage in Troops, Study Claims

    Tens of thousands of American combat veterans, many seemingly uninjured, carry higher risks of developing neurological disorders – and perhaps future organ ailments – simply because they were “exposed” to IED shockwaves, the Institute of Medicine reported Thursday.

    As the signature weapon in Iraq and Afghanistan, the improvised explosive device sends blast waves through the bodies of people even hundreds of yards from the detonation, leaving some nearby outwardly unharmed but disrupting their molecules and inner tissues. Years later, such changes could lead to adverse symptoms, according to a new IOM study.

    “This is a totally different type of injury than our troops were exposed to 50 years ago,” said Dr. S. Andrew Josephson, associate professor of clinical neurology at the University of California, San Francisco, and a study co-author. “It’s going to require a fair amount of investigation to figure out the entire expanse of the blast injury, how to diagnose it, how to capture these soldiers who’ve been exposed, how to treat these patients long term and, as importantly, how to prevent these injuries.”
    ...
    http://www.nbcnews.com/news/military...-claims-n29031
    TANSTAAFL = There Ain't No Such Thing As A Free Lunch

  • #2
    How is the concussion of an IED different from that produced by impacting artillery, mortar, or rocket rounds?

    Especially since some IEDs are made from artillery, mortar, or rocket rounds?
    Any man can hold his place when the bands play and women throw flowers; it is when the enemy presses close and metal shears through the ranks that one can acertain which are soldiers, and which are not.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Arnold J Rimmer View Post
      How is the concussion of an IED different from that produced by impacting artillery, mortar, or rocket rounds?

      Especially since some IEDs are made from artillery, mortar, or rocket rounds?
      Same question............how is it different than WW2........

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Arnold J Rimmer View Post
        How is the concussion of an IED different from that produced by impacting artillery, mortar, or rocket rounds?

        Especially since some IEDs are made from artillery, mortar, or rocket rounds?
        Ditto.
        Youthful Exuberance Is No Match For Old Age And Treachery.

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        • #5
          Just reporting folks, and all I got is what was in the article. Hoping someone more medical might come forth with more depth and story. I'm wondering the same as you are.
          TANSTAAFL = There Ain't No Such Thing As A Free Lunch

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          • #6
            Not realy diffrent than any other war. But maybe this is the first time a study has been done.
            you think you a real "bleep" solders you "bleep" plastic solders don't wory i will make you in to real "bleep" solders!! "bleep" plastic solders

            CPO Mzinyati

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            • #7
              Well hell...........I think i'll just stumble over to the VA and put in for disability for those 500# bombs they dropped about a mile from the hanger when I was in it..........I'm sure it shook my brain loose.........
              No disrespect. but after reading this I see no correlation to anyrthing new that was not experienced by millions of soldiers in past conflicts......
              I defer to LCM and those german 88's............

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              • #8
                Difference here is the amount of study of pressure wave or concussion injury in recent years. Relatively speaking we are just past the equivalent of germ theory and amputation as the universal treatment for wounds in understanding concussive injuries.

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                • #9
                  This might be it.

                  I noticed the thread topic and thought this might be relevant. At any rate, it's free.

                  Gulf War and Health, Volume 9: Long-Term Effects of Blast Exposures (2014)

                  http://www.nap.edu/download.php?record_id=18253
                  Any metaphor will tear if stretched over too much reality.

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                  • #10
                    "Shell shock, delayed action". The chiroquackers are going to love this.
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                    • #11
                      I think the injuries are similar to those in other wars since the wide spread use of high explosives.

                      The big difference is the advances in medical technology. Especially imaging technologies such as MRI. These technologies are increasing our understanding of the effects of blast injuries on the brain.

                      If I were a cutting edge neurological surgery researcher it would be interesting to get a grant to take an MRI or CAT scanner into one of the U.S. military hospitals close to the combat zone and do scans of service members who have been injured by IEDs.
                      "I disapprove of what you say, but I will defend to the death your right to say it" Beatrice Evelyn Hall
                      Updated for the 21st century... except if you are criticizing islam, that scares the $hii+e out of me!

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                      • #12
                        One of the less publicized facts about IED's is the amount of contamination injected into the victim by the shrapnel. The Middle Eastern landscape is a sewer from a bacteriological standpoint, and the shrapnel is highly contaminated. I have even seen a reference to an IED concealed inside the rotting carcass of a dog - a bio nightmare for both the victim and the surgeon.

                        As we are all aware, serious infections also damage the neurological system in some cases if the infective agent is able to cross the blood/brain barrier, so we don't really know what overall damage has been done.
                        Quis Custodiet Ipsos Custodes? Who is watching the watchers?

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                        • #13
                          Has there been a study of being up close to a J-57?
                          Credo quia absurdum.


                          Quantum mechanics describes nature as absurd from the point of view of common sense. And yet it fully agrees with experiment. So I hope you can accept nature as She is - absurd! - Richard Feynman

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Arnold J Rimmer View Post
                            How is the concussion of an IED different from that produced by impacting artillery, mortar, or rocket rounds?

                            Especially since some IEDs are made from artillery, mortar, or rocket rounds?
                            Because it got doctor what's-his-name a big research grant to say there is a difference even though this guy couldn't tell black powder, from TNT, from a nuclear bomb.

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                            • #15
                              What a total load of excrement. Most of them are wired artillery rounds or similar. Even the shaped charge are small in % terms.

                              As we are all aware, serious infections also damage the neurological system in some cases if the infective agent is able to cross the blood/brain barrier, so we don't really know what overall damage has been done.
                              You mean, the same aspect of explosive rounds for the last 300 years? Wow, that is new!
                              History is not tragedy; to understand historical reality, it is sometimes better to not know the end of the story.

                              Pierre Vidal-Naquet

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