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  • Camp dedicated to fallen scout

    Sometimes a soldier rates more than just mere words can decribe.

    Camp dedicated to fallen scout

    Camp Muleskinner, home of the 2nd Armored Cavalry’s Regiment’s support squadron, was renamed in honor of a fallen trooper April 1.

    The forward operating base was renamed “Camp Cuervo” in memory of Pfc. Ray D. Cuervo, Apache Troop, 1st Squadron, 2nd ACR, Fort Polk, La. Cuervo was killed while guarding a Baghdad gas station Dec. 28, 2003. He was posthumously awarded the Bronze Star, Purple Heart and the Army Achievement Medal.

    Lt. Col. Mark E. Calvert, 1st Squadron commander, said Cuervo developed a sense of responsibility for passing along his knowledge and experience. He shared his cavalry scout skills with Iraqi Civil Defense Corps soldiers, Calvert added.

    “Cuervo was one of many soldiers serving a cause greater than one’s self,” Calvert said. “A cause that often demands great personal sacrifice and, in Ray’s case, the ultimate sacrifice.”

    During the ceremony, a marble pyramid was unveiled in Cuervo’s honor, officially declaring the camp “Camp Cuervo” in memory of the fallen cavalry scout.

    Cuervo’s platoon mates recalled the trooper’s spirit and enthusiasm.

    “Cuervo always smiled and was always ready to do his job,” said 1st Lt. Michael C. Watson, 4th Platoon leader. “He always knew what he and this place were about. He was always ready to go out there and fight for his country and do what had to be done for the Iraqi people.”

    “Right up until the time before he died, he was smiling,” said Spc. Angel E. Sanabria, Cuervo’s former roommate. “I remember looking in the rearview mirror when we went out that day. He was just sitting back there smiling.”

    “He always respected everyone, regardless of how they treated him,” added Sgt. Jason P. Bingell. “He used to always watch out for us and, as my driver, he would always watch out for me.”

    “I would say that if you were to go back and tell Cuervo that he might die on Dec. 28, he’d still go out that gate with a smile because he knew what his job was, and what he was over here to do,” Watson said.
    Attached Files
    Only Tearful, Animal Man Through the Nature of his Being is Destined to
    a Life of Warfare...

  • #2
    There is something to be said when a person has moral clarity and a sense of purpose. God bless these guys.
    "We will always remember. We will always be proud. We will always be prepared, so we may always be free."- Ronald Reagan at the D-Day Anniversary

    http://www.imagestation.com/picture/...7/fe0df62e.jpg

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    • #3
      Re: Camp dedicated to fallen scout

      Originally posted by Scout Out
      Sometimes a soldier rates more than just mere words can decribe.



      Always great to hear stories about such troops - stories that our PC media conveniently "forget" to report.
      Mens Est Clavis Victoriae
      (The Mind Is The Key To Victory)

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      • #4
        I know that naming camps and bases has been a common practice in all branches in the US military. I remember it going back to WWII. Does anyone know the roots of this?

        Brad
        "We will always remember. We will always be proud. We will always be prepared, so we may always be free."- Ronald Reagan at the D-Day Anniversary

        http://www.imagestation.com/picture/...7/fe0df62e.jpg

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        • #5
          Re: Re: Camp dedicated to fallen scout

          Originally posted by hogdriver
          Always great to hear stories about such troops - stories that our PC media conveniently "forget" to report.
          Amen to that.
          Minister Of Propaganda For Sinister Inc.

          "Look! The enemy is inviting us to defeat them! We must oblige them!"

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Viper 10
            I know that naming camps and bases has been a common practice in all branches in the US military. I remember it going back to WWII. Does anyone know the roots of this?

            Brad
            Simply an honorific, a tribute that certain troop for distinguishing themselves in some way or other. The first that I am aware of (though I think it dates to sometime in the 19th Century), is Lt Selfridge, the first armed forces airborne casualty. He was killed while riding a Wright Flyer with Orville Wright. Selfridge ANGB, Michigan was named for him, in 1917, if memory serves.
            Mens Est Clavis Victoriae
            (The Mind Is The Key To Victory)

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