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  • Kosovo war

    Milosevic is in power. We have seen and heard of Bosnian Serbs attrocities in Bosnia and Croatia. Croats didn't do too much netter either. Now in 1999, NATO decides to attack Serbia in order to stop the displacing and killing of Kosovo Albanians.

    1. Any Kosovo veterans in the membership?

    2. Should have NATO launched the attack?

    3. Where are we today. It is 2004 and the Serbian province is still ethnically divided. Hatred, selfishness, mistrust.

    4. How long should NATO troops remain in Kosovo? Or Bosnia for that matter?
    http://canadiangenealogyandresearch.ca

    Soviet and Canadian medal collector!

  • #2
    I think, even though it is deeply divided and scared by hatred and stained with the blood of many, I beleieve NATO troops should stay, at least long enough to make a major impact and better the country. A lotta people may not agree with me but that's my opinion. We really have done quite a bit. I don't wanna say too much to avoid catching so much flak.
    Keenan K.

    "Anything worth living for is worth dying for and anything worth dying for is certainly worth living for."
    -Catch-22

    "We're the airborne, we're supposed to be surrounded."
    -Maj. Richard Winters, Bastogne

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    • #3
      I don't believe you will catch any flak as you are entitled to your opinion as are the others. On the other hand, how long is should remain? I was in Kosovo from June 2000 to March 2001, and over the 9 month period, didn't see any forward movement in the relations. After seeing the ethnic clashes from last month, I don't see an end in sight.
      http://canadiangenealogyandresearch.ca

      Soviet and Canadian medal collector!

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      • #4
        I never actually asked her about it, but a friend of mine here moved to the US in the last couple years from Bosnia. I'm fairly certain she was there during a lot of the conflict, but I never really felt like I should ask much about it.
        “To discriminate against a thoroughly upright citizen because he belongs to some particular church, or because, like Abraham Lincoln, he has not avowed his allegiance to any church, is an outrage against that liberty of conscience which is one of the foundations of American life.”

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        • #5
          Re: Kosovo war

          Originally posted by dannybou
          Milosevic is in power. We have seen and heard of Bosnian Serbs attrocities in Bosnia and Croatia. Croats didn't do too much netter either. Now in 1999, NATO decides to attack Serbia in order to stop the displacing and killing of Kosovo Albanians.

          1. Any Kosovo veterans in the
          membership?

          Not directly, but did provide support.

          2. Should have NATO launched the attack?

          No, this was a campaign waged without clear objectives, without coherent strategy, with very foggy ROE. In short, when General Clark trumpted his "victory", it made him appear a buffoon.

          3. Where are we today. It is 2004 and the Serbian province is still ethnically divided. Hatred, selfishness, mistrust.

          Par for the course. The campaign settled nothing. While did not support the KLA, neither did we come out as strongly against them as against the Serbs. Yes, their acts were not so terrible as the Serbs, but try telling that to a Serbian Kosovar family driven from their village, or who saw their menfolk murdered, or who were dispossessed by ruthless gunmen. As you say, the hatred remains. In fact, I would submit that it is worse. The disposition of Kosovo is no closer to resolution, and looks unlike it will anytime soon. After a Pyrrhic victory, neither NATO or the UN may look proudly upon this charade

          4. How long should NATO troops remain in Kosovo? Or Bosnia for that matter?
          Get out now!! There are few if any clear and attainable objectives, and hazards serious enough to question the worth of the deployment. True to its impotence, the UN oversaw the partition of Bosnia into three segemnts that hate each other. Apparently the UN with never learn that partition is the problem, not the solution. Look at the three 20th Century partitions and base your assessment of the utility of partition on the outcome of all.

          1. Vietnam;
          2. Korea;
          3. Germany.

          Hardly a ringing endorsement, is it? Now adding Bosnia as the next debacle, what will the UN do next. Indeed, where does Bosnia go from here. At this time, it is another war waiting to happen, and likely far more savage than the first. It is easy to see, one opf the three sees some piece of land in one of the other groups' area, and decides that they will have it. Since diplomacy is out, they make a grab, provoking a response, and presto! we again have a war. The other power figures that, since the other two are occupied, they will enrich themselves. Thus are the grounds set for a colossal three-way war. Thank you United Nations!
          Mens Est Clavis Victoriae
          (The Mind Is The Key To Victory)

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          • #6
            I was there in 2001 with the 24 MEU. It sucked.

            Semper Fi

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            • #7
              Wasn't it Weinberger that came up with some foreign involvement policy step plan? Something about Is it strategically important, if not, does it have other importance, if it does, how should the US get involved, if militarily, how do we get in, if we decide to go in, are we going in to win and how do we do it and for how long, if it's not working, how do we get out... something or other...
              If voting could really change things, it would be illegal.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Overseer
                I never actually asked her about it, but a friend of mine here moved to the US in the last couple years from Bosnia. I'm fairly certain she was there during a lot of the conflict, but I never really felt like I should ask much about it.
                One of the ladies I went to Nursing School with was from Albania, and had family in Kosovo. She talked quite a bit about the abuses they had suffered. I sympathized with her, but when I asked about the KLA, she was quiet for a bit, then said "well, we don't support them, most Kosovars don't". It only shows that no ethnic group has clean hands there. By trying Milosevic and not even considering charges against anyone else, NATO and its component nations have entered on a blood feud with the Serbians. By example, Bosnian leader Alija Izetbegovic is well known to employ persons sanctioned by the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia. We are deeply involved in something that we don't have the first understanding of. The Balkans have long been known as "the powderkeg of Europe".
                Mens Est Clavis Victoriae
                (The Mind Is The Key To Victory)

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by hogdriver
                  On of the ladies I went to Nursing School with was from Albania, and had family in Kosovo. She talked quite a bit about the abuses they had suffered. I sympathized with her, but when I asked about the KLA, she was quiet for a bit, then said "well, we don't support them, most Kosovars don't". It only shows that no ethnic group has clean hands there. By trying Milosevic and not even considering charges against anyone else, NATO and its component nations have entered on a blood feud with the Serbians. By example, Bosnian leader Alija Izetbegovic is well known to employ persons sanctioned by the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia. We are deeply involved in something that we don't have the first understanding of. The Balkans have long been known as "the powderkeg of Europe".
                  During my time in Kosovo, both sides claimed atrocities be it kidnapping, murders, beatings, ransomming etc... The KLA was viewed as terrorists to the Serbians and local Heroes to the Albanians. They even errected several memorials along main routes to Pristina dedicated to members of the KLA who had been killed by the Serbian police.
                  http://canadiangenealogyandresearch.ca

                  Soviet and Canadian medal collector!

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by dannybou
                    ... The KLA was viewed as terrorists to the Serbians and local Heroes to the Albanians. They even errected several memorials along main routes to Pristina dedicated to members of the KLA who had been killed by the Serbian police.
                    Which lends credence to the statement "one man's terrorist is another man's freedom fighter".
                    Scientists have announced they've discovered a cure for apathy. However no one has shown the slightest bit of interest !!

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