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  • More Land Losses?

    It seems that fighting has broken out even more! In Kirkuk (i believe) insurgents have risen up against US forces. And now it seems that Najaf is about to fall to the rebels according to news sources. Will somebody please tell me the truth...are we getting our butts kicked? It kind of seems like it!

    COTTER
    "Send Me"

  • #2
    Sounds nasty.

    Is this thing turning into a bona fide war again?

    Dr. S.
    Imagine a ball of iron, the size of the sun. And once a year a tiny sparrow brushes its surface with the tip of its wing. And when that ball of iron, the size of the sun, is worn away to nothing, your punishment will barely have begun.

    www.sinisterincorporated.co.uk

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    • #3
      I Still Support

      I most definately support the troops in Iraq...but still what are our main goals...one of the Presidents officials said when Bush took office one of his main plans was to attack Iraq. I dont know but I'm beginning to think this may be a personal thing with Bush and Iraq. After all Saddam did have plans to assassinate President Bush (the first one) when he toured Kuwait in 1992. Does anybody think this may have anything to do with this War? Does anybody think that Bush may be out for revenge and now has bitten off more than he can chew? Reply with your comments!

      COTTER
      "Send Me"

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      • #4
        Re: More Land Losses?

        Originally posted by cotterc404
        It seems that fighting has broken out even more! In Kirkuk (i believe) insurgents have risen up against US forces. And now it seems that Najaf is about to fall to the rebels according to news sources. Will somebody please tell me the truth...are we getting our butts kicked? It kind of seems like it!

        COTTER
        No, we are simply taking a measured response. This does not imply that all is well - it is not. However, extremist groups such as the Mahdi Army, the Sunnis in the Triangle, the Kurds and any other extra-national groups, have little besides numbers. Yes, many of them have some rifle/assault weapon/RPG, etc. but when under fire they will prove poorly capable of using these weapons effectively. Sure they may stand and fire at civilians, or at our troops when not being targetted or fired at, they do well at IEDs, but they have no fighting power. When we engage them, they will be crushed mercilessly.
        Mens Est Clavis Victoriae
        (The Mind Is The Key To Victory)

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        • #5
          One has to wonder if this "uprising" has something to do with June 30th. Each group wants to control the country maybe? Janos?
          http://canadiangenealogyandresearch.ca

          Soviet and Canadian medal collector!

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          • #6
            You're going to see infighting as each group jockeys for position, but there are those that are not going to be 'allowed' to be in power (ie. the Shi'ite majority... while it hasn't been said in plain English, the US will not allow an Islamic Republic to come to power, even if that's what the majority 'vote' for).

            As far as the fighting goes, all the nationalists needed was a 'leader' to get them going. I don't see them doing anything but holding out in certain areas. They know they can't win in stand up fights and they know they can't win by themselves in the end, so they're hoping we respond to them with overwhelming force that persuades the majority 'center' to also side with them against the 'invading indfidels killing their countrymen'. While taking out each pocket is necessary, if we're not careful, we'll simply fuel the fire as we're fighting it... the problem becomes is it getting larger as we fight it or smaller?

            After WWII, the Japanese Emperor convinced his people not to fight. In Germany... I attribute the success to hard work, lots of money, a desire for a bulwark against Uncle Joe, and a similarity in industrial Western cultures. In Afghanistan, it's not working any better than in Iraq (go figure, it's not and never really was strategically important anyway... despite what anyone said publically ). In the Balkans, there's an enforced peace, but not really by 'occupying' NATO forces (or maybe they ARE seen as occupiers - at least by Serbs- I don't know... anyone in the know, how's it going?). So what's Iraqs problems? A huge cultural gap, a history of dictatorial/royal/colonial control over the people, years of anti-American propaganda, simmering feelings of revenge for getting whacked twice by Americans, and a general dislike and distrust of Western influence. None of that can be fixed in a year, three years, or even ten years, least of all when the country is controlled and occupied by 'invaders' and those who don't care are eventually convinced by one way or another that the occupation is not good and do decide to oppose it.
            If voting could really change things, it would be illegal.

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            • #7
              Do we know what the new Iraqi army and police officers are doing during this time? For or against the coalition?
              http://canadiangenealogyandresearch.ca

              Soviet and Canadian medal collector!

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              • #8
                In the near term what is happening is the radicals making the mistake of engaging the US in straight up firefights. When they come out and engage us that way the systematic combat approach will wear them down and remove many. We won't be thrown out but the question is will we leave too soon.

                There is a much more serious question here:

                "Where are the Iraqis?"

                What is happening currently clearly demonstrates the ruling council has no force with which it is willing and/or able to enforce the rule of law. If they do not have such a capacity now how will they have it by June.

                We eliminated what was essentially a right wing dictator. It is not a success however until there is a stable moderate government that has the capacity to enforce the rule of law throughout Iraq. If that is achieved then then the gallant sacrifice of our troops can be said to have achieved its purpose. If we end up with either a radicalized government or a failed state where the rule of law cannot be enforced, then the world will be a much more dangerous place than it was before the inviasion and the lives of our troops will have been thoughtlessly wasted.
                Boston Strong!

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