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  • Books and videos about the Falklands War.

    I've been increasingly interested in this campaign and would like some recommendations on what good books are available and/or ones you've read.
    I have read books many years ago with the British perspective, but would like to find out more in regards to how the Argentines operated. One book that looks promising is called "Carrier at Risk: Argentinean Aircraft Carrier and Anti-Submarine Operations against Royal Navy's Attack Submarines during the Falklands" which seems to be about the ARA 25 de Mayo and the British attack subs.

    51i%2BjKYlgcL._SX351_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg

    Anyone else got good book recommendations?
    Last edited by Achtung Baby; 10 Jun 20, 23:05.
    "In modern war... you will die like a dog for no good reason."
    Ernest Hemingway.

    Sapere aude.

  • #2
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EvvLxC1rvrQ

    Mark Felton did a you tube clip on it.
    "To be free is better than to be unfree - always."

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    • #3
      Here goes...
      I have about every book written about the war that I have been able to find. I've been interested in it since the 80s. Here's what I have and a few comments on each.
      Argentine Fight for the Falklands--Middlebrook--the only book I have with the Argentinian view. Interesting because of that.
      Battle for the Falklands--Hastings--my first book about it and a good primer but written so soon after the war that a lot of sources weren't there.
      Reason in Writing--Southby-Tailyour--a great book.
      Amphibious Assault Falklands--Clapp--very good read about the man "stuck in the middle".
      Across an Angry Sea--Delves--good coverage of retaking South Georgia but the Falklands parts are nothing new.
      March to the South Atlantic--Vaux--good read about 42 Cdo.
      The Yompers--Gardiner--good read about 45 Cdo.
      5th Infantry Brigade in the Falklands--a good "rounding out" book but they were a relatively minor part of the fight.
      3 Commando Brigade in the Falklands--Thompson--a very good read.
      One Hundred Days--Woodward--an opposite viewpoint from a person who was slagged by others.
      Logistics in the Falklands War--Privratsky--another "rounding out" book. Nowhere near as boring as the title suggests.
      The Falklands War There and Back Again--Norman--interesting read about NP8901.
      Pen & Sword has two good books (about Osprey size) about Pebble Island and Mount Longdon. They are mainly interesting since they have a small part about the Argie viewpoint but mainly because there are very good color photos of the battlefields.
      I bought the Osprey trilogy decades ago but disposed of them when better sources became available. I also had Air War South Atlantic in cheap paperback but sold it it years ago. I might buy it again even though I find the air part the least interesting part of the war.
      I've liked the Falklands War because it was big enough to be interesting while small enough to understand the whole war. It was a strictly infantry war fought by some of the best light infantry in the world. What was also interesting is that all of the best books were written by the commanders on-site. They give the strategic view as commanders but also the tactical because they were living in the mud and water with the troops. If you have any questions, fire away.

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      • #4
        Thx, the Falklands grabbed my attention when hostilities broke out and the first book I read was "I counted them all out and I counted them all back": The battle for the Falklands.

        51Vl%2B1-qOdL._SX303_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg

        The book you mentioned... Reason in Writing--Southby-Tailyour. Thats looks very interesting, I've just put it on my wish list in Amazon so I don't forget. Same with 'Logistics in the Falklands War'.
        So that's three books I'm keen to read for now. Again, thx for the post, much appreciated.
        "In modern war... you will die like a dog for no good reason."
        Ernest Hemingway.

        Sapere aude.

        Comment


        • #5
          Yeah, the book by Southby-Tailyour was my favorite. He was one of those eccentric British officers that are mentioned so much in history. I think the only reason he made major was because his father was a former CGRM (Commanding General Royal Marines). Then the Falklands happened and he was the right man at the right spot and he excelled. He ended up retiring as a Lt Colonel.

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          • #6
            Recommend "War in the Falklands: The Full Story" by the Sunday Times of London Insight Team and "Not Mentioned in Despatches...: The History and Mythology of the Battle of Goose Green" by Fritz-Gibbon
            Leadership is the ability to rise above conventional wisdom.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by R.N. Armstrong View Post
              Recommend "War in the Falklands: The Full Story" by the Sunday Times of London Insight Team and "Not Mentioned in Despatches...: The History and Mythology of the Battle of Goose Green" by Fritz-Gibbon
              The book on Goose Green sounds interesting but (without reading it) the other book seems like it would be missing many details since it was written so quickly after the war itself.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by johns624 View Post

                The book on Goose Green sounds interesting but (without reading it) the other book seems like it would be missing many details since it was written so quickly after the war itself.
                The Sunday Times Insight Team did the same thing after the Yom Kippur War in 1973, it was a good overview and talked to turning points and issues during the war, such as the Egyptian use of ATGMs and the Israeli tankers coming to grips with the technological challenge to armored warfare. It had the look of one of those turning moments in military history when infantry could stand against mobile forces, such as the longbow, infantry squares.

                I used the Goose Green book as well as other sources to write a "You Command" tactical decision article for Armchair General.
                Last edited by R.N. Armstrong; 29 Apr 20, 19:17.
                Leadership is the ability to rise above conventional wisdom.

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                • #9
                  Added videos to the title, just wanted to post some videos from several speakers... one is Major General Kenneth L Privratsky who wrote 'Logistics in the Falklands War.' I really enjoyed listening to Rear Adm. Chris Parry: Falklands War and the Importance of Naval Corporate Memory, partially because he was in the thick of it.










                  "In modern war... you will die like a dog for no good reason."
                  Ernest Hemingway.

                  Sapere aude.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    CQB by Mike Curtis is an interesting read for the Grunts eye view , especially if you are reading it in a in a warm dry house rather than being cold, wet, hungry and exhausted and about to go on stag for 2 hours. Curtis went from the Coal mines of Wales to the Paras and later the SAS, a Front rower in Rugby and as good a soldier as you would ever want to serve with. His account of the attack on Goose Green is pretty brutal. I have no idea but I might suspect that he might not have personally seen every single thing in his account, some of it could have been second hand, hard to say, but the book seems solid.
                    One accurate measurement is worth a thousand expert opinions - Admiral Grace Hopper

                    "The eunuch should not take pride in his chastity."
                    Wu Cheng'en Monkey

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                    • #11
                      I just finished reading a new book on the Falklands by Nick van der Bijl. He wrote the account of 5th Inf Bde. This is his personal story. It's titled My Friends, The Enemy and his role as an Intel Corps SSgt on the 3rd Cdo Bde staff. It's quite interesting. Chukka, I'll have to look your recommendation up. My Falklands library is inching in on 20 books. I always have room for one more!

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                      • #12
                        Okay, I ordered it, along with a book on the Suez Crisis and RN cruisers in the 20th century. Amazon is liking me more every day.

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