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What's your favourite battle?

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  • What's your favourite battle?

    My favourite would have to be Cannae(216BC). Here Hannibal(Carthage) having crossed the Alps into Italy achieved his third decisive victory over the Romans in succession. With an estimated 40 000 men he surrounded and destroyed a Roman army numbering an estimated 80 000 men. Roman losses were said to range from 50 000 to 70 000 men. Hannibal's double-envelopment of the Romans is considered one of history's classic victories. But although they pannicked, the Romans did not sue for peace and after a further 14 years of war Scipio ended it by defeating Hannibal at Zama(202BC).

    This marked the beginning of Rome's acquisition of an Empire.

  • #2
    Every battle I have ever beaten you at sharpey!

    If your talking ancient battles i like the one where the Greeks ended the the Persian invasion of Greece, forget what it was called but the Spartans and Athenians dealt out a huge defeat to the Persians, some 200,000 against 30,000 Greeks (this is my rough memory working here) although you would have to consider some exaggeration on the winners side, but many scholars beleive this figure.
    Not lip service, nor obsequious homage to superiors, nor servile observance of forms and customs...the Australian army is proof that individualism is the best and not the worst foundation upon which to build up collective discipline - General Monash

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    • #3
      Konrad 3 in WWII in the Hungarian operation.

      January 1945, Germany planned to relieve the sieged Budapest.
      The attack seemed successful in the first time, but later it changed.

      The map of the first day...
      Attached Files
      Last edited by laszlo.nemedi; 11 Apr 04, 23:41.
      a brain cell

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      • #4
        It was Platae. Apparently the Spartan sacrifice at Thermopylae(480BC) shook the morale of the Persians. The defeat of their enormous fleet at Salamis(480BC) probably convinced them that their gods had abandoned them. They collapsed at Platae(479BC).
        Last edited by Sharpe; 12 Apr 04, 00:31. Reason: incorrect quote

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        • #5
          yes their wicker shields were no match for spartan steel
          Not lip service, nor obsequious homage to superiors, nor servile observance of forms and customs...the Australian army is proof that individualism is the best and not the worst foundation upon which to build up collective discipline - General Monash

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          • #6
            My favorite ancient battle was the Roman siege of Alesia. Julius Caesar trapped renegade Gauls in the town and ringed it with fortifications. Then a large Gallic relief force (est. 250,000 men) moved in to free their trapped tribes. Caesar built more fortifications facing out to repel the new force, basically creating a dounut around the town. Then the Romans fought a huge battle on all sides.

            Caesar was one cool hombre and he won, the battle is considered a classic.

            Avalon Hill made a game on the battle. It was one of the first wargames I ever played. It started my interest in Roman fortifications and ancient history.
            "Nations are never content to confine their rivalships and enmities to themselves. It is their usual policy to disseminate them as widely, as they can, regardless how far it may interfere with the tranquility or happiness of the nations which they are able to influence." -- Alexander Hamilton

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            • #7
              Favourite wargaming battle? Waterloo in 15mm.


              Favourite battle demonstrating good generalship? Austerlitz.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by laszlo.nemedi
                Konrad 3 in WWII in the Hungarian operation.

                January 1945, Germany planned to relieve the sieged Budapest.
                The attack seemed successful in the first time, but later it changed.

                The map of the first day...
                Have you ever seen the Boardgame from 'Command' Magazine on that battle?
                http://www.irelandinhistory.blogspot.ie/

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Pfc TAZ
                  My favorite ancient battle was the Roman siege of Alesia. Julius Caesar trapped renegade Gauls in the town and ringed it with fortifications. Then a large Gallic relief force (est. 250,000 men) moved in to free their trapped tribes. Caesar built more fortifications facing out to repel the new force, basically creating a dounut around the town. Then the Romans fought a huge battle on all sides.

                  Caesar was one cool hombre and he won, the battle is considered a classic.

                  Avalon Hill made a game on the battle. It was one of the first wargames I ever played. It started my interest in Roman fortifications and ancient history.
                  Great battle; Great game!
                  http://www.irelandinhistory.blogspot.ie/

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                  • #10
                    I would have to go for Agincourt - 6000 English/Welsh -v- 30000 French.
                    "Teamwork is essential - it gives the Enemy someone else to shoot at"

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Wolfe Tone
                      Have you ever seen the Boardgame from 'Command' Magazine on that battle?
                      No, I haven't, do you have any info on that?

                      a brain cell

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                      • #12
                        Gettysburg

                        Little Round Top. College Profesor LtCol Chamberlain whips Gen. Hoods Texans. Can't fall back, can't hold the line. Fix Bayonets and Charge! If Chamberlain was a Marine it would have been icing on the cake.

                        OFG out

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                        • #13
                          I would have to say the battle of Trafalger and the battle of Midway.
                          I know both are naval engagements, but the represent two very important eras in naval history and in the histories of the winning navies. For the British Navy at Trafalger it was the zenith of the man of war and ships that fired iron balls at wooden hulls. For the Americans at Midway it was the beginning of the supremecy of the United States Navy.
                          Just as England's wooden walls made her a superpower in her day, America's flat tops help make her a superpower today.

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                          • #14
                            As noted by Sharpe, Cannae was a classic and probably my favorite. However, a close second is the battle of Carrhae, in 53 B.C., where the Parthians kicked ass on the Romans, misled by Crassus, who outnumbered the wily Mesopotamians by 3-1!

                            An excellent case study in superior tactics prevailing over arrogant and incompetent leadership.
                            I have no problem at all with being proved wrong. Especially when being proved wrong leaves the world a better place, than being proved right...

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                            • #15
                              It should be noted that Crassus' colossal stupidity and arrogance is what has changed the original Latin word Crassus, meaning "thick" or "solid" into the derogatory etymological derivative of "crass", meaning "colossally stupid; utterly tactless, or insensitive".
                              I have no problem at all with being proved wrong. Especially when being proved wrong leaves the world a better place, than being proved right...

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