Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Curious U.S. and French Military Deployments

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Curious U.S. and French Military Deployments

    Got this email from a friend





    Analysis

    According to a worldwide network of aircraft spotters and trackers, at least a dozen MC-130H, HC-130N, HC-130P and AC-130U military transport planes and gunships crossed the Atlantic Ocean on Sept. 13 heading eastbound. These aircraft are typically used for a variety of special tasks, including in close cooperation with special operations forces. The last reported stop for the aircraft was Souda Bay, Crete. It is unclear whether the aircraft have left Crete, but we are working on tracking them down.



    Four F/A-18 Super Hornets from U.S. Marine Fighter Attack Squadron 314
    A week and a half later, on Sept. 24, the same network of aircraft spotters noted 12 U.S. Marine Corps F/A-18 Hornet fighter jets arriving in two waves at Moron air base in Spain. It is not known where the squadron is heading, though it could be en route to Afghanistan to reinforce elements there. The Harrier squadron that suffered heavy losses in the Sept. 14 attack on Camp Bastion has already been replaced by another Harrier unit, so it is unlikely that the squadron's deployment is directly linked to that event. It is also possible that the F/A-18s are heading to the Gulf Cooperation Council region. A number of air superiority squadrons, including an F-22 Raptor squadron, have already deployed to the region. If that is the case, the squadron is intended simply as reinforcements or replacements for assets currently deployed there.

    Also on Sept. 24, The New York Times published an article stating that Iraq and the United States were negotiating an agreement that could result in the return of small units of U.S. soldiers to Iraq on training missions. At the request of the Iraqi government, according to U.S. Gen. Robert Caslen, a unit of Army special operations soldiers was recently deployed to Iraq to advise on counterterrorism and to help with intelligence. It is possible that at least some of the MC-130 aircraft previously mentioned were delivering these special operations troops to Iraq.

    Another report on Sept. 24, this one by the Le Figaro French-language newspaper, said some 100 French special operations troops had been deployed in the sub-Saharan region to counteract militants in northern Mali. Le Figaro also reported that maritime patrol aircraft that can be used to collect intelligence will be deployed to the region and that commandos of the French navy will reinforce the French special operations troops.



    Finally, Italian journalist Guido Olimpio reported in September that U.S. unmanned aerial vehicles are currently tracking militants in Cyrenaica, the historical name for eastern Libya. He also said "reliable sources" had confirmed that U.S. special operations forces were planning to carry out intelligence operations that could be in preparation for surgical strikes in North Africa, including in Libya and in Mali.

    All these deployments could be previously scheduled movements for training or part of ongoing operations. They also do not necessarily mean any one mission is imminent. The United States and France could simply be positioning military assets in a region that is rife with conflict and that may eventually require rapid military intervention or action.
    Too Much To Do Too Little Time

  • #2
    Originally posted by FTCS View Post
    Got this email from a friend





    Analysis

    According to a worldwide network of aircraft spotters and trackers, at least a dozen MC-130H, HC-130N, HC-130P and AC-130U military transport planes and gunships crossed the Atlantic Ocean on Sept. 13 heading eastbound. These aircraft are typically used for a variety of special tasks, including in close cooperation with special operations forces. The last reported stop for the aircraft was Souda Bay, Crete. It is unclear whether the aircraft have left Crete, but we are working on tracking them down.



    Four F/A-18 Super Hornets from U.S. Marine Fighter Attack Squadron 314
    A week and a half later, on Sept. 24, the same network of aircraft spotters noted 12 U.S. Marine Corps F/A-18 Hornet fighter jets arriving in two waves at Moron air base in Spain. It is not known where the squadron is heading, though it could be en route to Afghanistan to reinforce elements there. The Harrier squadron that suffered heavy losses in the Sept. 14 attack on Camp Bastion has already been replaced by another Harrier unit, so it is unlikely that the squadron's deployment is directly linked to that event. It is also possible that the F/A-18s are heading to the Gulf Cooperation Council region. A number of air superiority squadrons, including an F-22 Raptor squadron, have already deployed to the region. If that is the case, the squadron is intended simply as reinforcements or replacements for assets currently deployed there.

    Also on Sept. 24, The New York Times published an article stating that Iraq and the United States were negotiating an agreement that could result in the return of small units of U.S. soldiers to Iraq on training missions. At the request of the Iraqi government, according to U.S. Gen. Robert Caslen, a unit of Army special operations soldiers was recently deployed to Iraq to advise on counterterrorism and to help with intelligence. It is possible that at least some of the MC-130 aircraft previously mentioned were delivering these special operations troops to Iraq.

    Another report on Sept. 24, this one by the Le Figaro French-language newspaper, said some 100 French special operations troops had been deployed in the sub-Saharan region to counteract militants in northern Mali. Le Figaro also reported that maritime patrol aircraft that can be used to collect intelligence will be deployed to the region and that commandos of the French navy will reinforce the French special operations troops.



    Finally, Italian journalist Guido Olimpio reported in September that U.S. unmanned aerial vehicles are currently tracking militants in Cyrenaica, the historical name for eastern Libya. He also said "reliable sources" had confirmed that U.S. special operations forces were planning to carry out intelligence operations that could be in preparation for surgical strikes in North Africa, including in Libya and in Mali.

    All these deployments could be previously scheduled movements for training or part of ongoing operations. They also do not necessarily mean any one mission is imminent. The United States and France could simply be positioning military assets in a region that is rife with conflict and that may eventually require rapid military intervention or action.
    Maybe someone should keep quiet.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by majormack View Post
      Maybe someone should keep quiet.
      The last time anyone in the lame-stream media did that was in the very few weeks after 9/11.
      They knew they would have been lynched for doing the usual thing.

      Comment


      • #4
        No, I can't imagine it being Libya. Not after the Libyan demonstrators themselves had sacked the headquarters of militant groups that had launched the attack on Ambassador Stevens, and the central government has made strong statements.

        The use of drones using Hellfire, maybe, but not fighter-bombers, even if these will only be lobbing small bombs. The political signature will be all wrong.

        If Obama is foolish enough to launch aerial bombardment on targets within Libya, then Romney will have an opening to accuse Obama of being a "Shoot First Look Later" Neo-Con!

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by majormack View Post
          Maybe someone should keep quiet.
          I actually agree with you. Most, actually a significant majority, of intell is open source, like the Internet and such. I worry about that. It would sure suck to get a good guy hurt because our speculation gave someone else an idea they would not have come up with on their own. I guess the chances are slim, but still, discussing real world deployments has always been a pet peeve of mine.

          Comment


          • #6
            Is this the kind of build up that would precede a joint Israeli/US attack on the 58 defensive, radar and nuclear sites inside Iran which, it is said, need to be taken out for disruption of the Iranian nuclear program to be effective?


            Philip
            "The whole problem with the world is that fools and fanatics are always so certain of themselves, and wiser people so full of doubts." Bertrand Russell

            Comment


            • #7
              Moved to Modern Wars & Warfare.

              ACG Staff

              On the Plains of Hesitation lie the blackened bones of countless millions who, at the dawn of victory, sat down to rest-and resting... died. Adlai E. Stevenson

              ACG History Today

              BoRG

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Ogukuo72 View Post
                No, I can't imagine it being Libya. Not after the Libyan demonstrators themselves had sacked the headquarters of militant groups that had launched the attack on Ambassador Stevens, and the central government has made strong statements.

                The use of drones using Hellfire, maybe, but not fighter-bombers, even if these will only be lobbing small bombs. The political signature will be all wrong.

                If Obama is foolish enough to launch aerial bombardment on targets within Libya, then Romney will have an opening to accuse Obama of being a "Shoot First Look Later" Neo-Con!
                Are you serious ??

                Cyrenaica is quite literaly the middle of nowhere - you could drop a nuke there and it would take a week for the news the reach Tripoli. (j/k don't anybody get any silly ideas )

                In addition if these targets are the offspring of the malinese islamists, the more secular libyan tribes will be more then happy see them disappear in a small puff of smoke regardless if it's drone- or planebourne

                Also this is not really a big secret - it has been clearly announced by the foreign department and predicted by most observers as soon as the Benghazi attack happened.

                http://www.iol.co.za/news/africa/mal...tack-1.1391060
                Last edited by Snowygerry; 09 Oct 12, 03:32.
                Lambert of Montaigu - Crusader.

                Bolgios - Mercenary Game.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Ogukuo72 View Post
                  If Obama is foolish enough to launch aerial bombardment on targets within Libya, then Romney will have an opening to accuse Obama of being a "Shoot First Look Later" Neo-Con!
                  Just a day or two ago Mitt made a speech claiming Obama is not aggresive enough. Of course politicians are allowd to have it both ways in their speeches, so its ok

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I'm sorry, but the email sounds like the result of someone with an agenda's creative writing. I'm a member of airliners.net and have never heard of a worldwide spotters network. Besides, all planespotting software sites that I've been to do not show military flights. Also, the email is all over the map. One minute it's talking about sub-Sahara and the next Iraq. Obviously, he doesn't know how much distance there is between the two areas.
                    Last edited by johns624; 09 Oct 12, 07:42.

                    Comment

                    Latest Topics

                    Collapse

                    Working...
                    X