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Native Americans and the Civil War

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  • Native Americans and the Civil War

    Hi all

    I recently read where some alliances were formed between native americans and CSA forces in some states.

    Is this true, and if so, was autonomy promised for any of these tribes by the CSA or was it a case of alliances being formed against the common enemy i.e. the Union ???

    Regards

    Darren
    "I hope to live long enough to see my surviving comrades march side by side with the Union veterans along Pennsylvania Avenue, and then I will die happy."

    General James Longstreet at a Memorial Day Parade in 1902

  • #2
    Originally posted by newjack66 View Post
    Hi all

    I recently read where some alliances were formed between native americans and CSA forces in some states.

    Is this true, and if so, was autonomy promised for any of these tribes by the CSA or was it a case of alliances being formed against the common enemy i.e. the Union ???

    Regards

    Darren
    The rebel stated did sign treaties with Indian tribes, the Choctaw, Chickasaw and Cherokee among them. Of course there were promises made, though I doubt that a Confederate government is any more prone to keep them than the antebellum US government.

    Frankly, I can't see how you can call the "Union" rather than the American government the enemy of the Indians. Note that one of the most tragic events in Indian relations, the Trail of Tears, involved the removal of Indian tribes to the west of the Mississippi River ONLY from land that would be Confederate Territory.

    That event is initiated by a president from a to become Confederate state. White Americans in the south certainly didn't protest the injustice of that event!

    Certainly the rebels welcomed this during the conflict, but I don't see a change to the Indians lot even with a Confederate victory.

    Regards,
    Dennis
    If stupid was a criminal offense Sea Lion believers would be doing life.

    Shouting out to Half Pint for bringing back the big mugs!

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by D1J1 View Post
      The rebel stated did sign treaties with Indian tribes, the Choctaw, Chickasaw and Cherokee among them. Of course there were promises made, though I doubt that a Confederate government is any more prone to keep them than the antebellum US government.

      Frankly, I can't see how you can call the "Union" rather than the American government the enemy of the Indians. Note that one of the most tragic events in Indian relations, the Trail of Tears, involved the removal of Indian tribes to the west of the Mississippi River ONLY from land that would be Confederate Territory.

      That event is initiated by a president from a to become Confederate state. White Americans in the south certainly didn't protest the injustice of that event!

      Certainly the rebels welcomed this during the conflict, but I don't see a change to the Indians lot even with a Confederate victory.

      Regards,
      Dennis
      I take your points. I'll do some more reading on this, but I suspect that a CSA victory (as you point out) would have meant little in retaining and/or regaining their traditional lands.

      Cheers
      "I hope to live long enough to see my surviving comrades march side by side with the Union veterans along Pennsylvania Avenue, and then I will die happy."

      General James Longstreet at a Memorial Day Parade in 1902

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by newjack66 View Post
        Hi all

        I recently read where some alliances were formed between native americans and CSA forces in some states.

        Is this true, and if so, was autonomy promised for any of these tribes by the CSA or was it a case of alliances being formed against the common enemy i.e. the Union ???

        Regards

        Darren
        Here are some excellent links pertaining to this:
        http://www.civilwar.org/battlefields...ridgehess.html

        http://www.nytimes.com/1862/04/13/ne...l?pagewanted=1

        http://www.arkansasheritage.com/in_t...sassummary.pdf
        The muffled drums sad roll has beat the soldier's last tatoo. No more on life's parade shall meet that brave and fallen few.

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        • #5
          Thanks for that !
          "I hope to live long enough to see my surviving comrades march side by side with the Union veterans along Pennsylvania Avenue, and then I will die happy."

          General James Longstreet at a Memorial Day Parade in 1902

          Comment


          • #6
            Rather than taking sides, as eastern tribes had done during earlier wars including the Revolutionary War, the Civil War actually represented more of a respite for certain NA tribes. This was especially so for the beleaguered Seminoles, but not so much so for the OK Indian territory.

            For me, the most fascinating NA contribution in the Civil War is embodied in the persona of Ely Parker.

            Comment


            • #7
              There is no short and easy answer to the subject. First you have to find the states with "Indians" and then examine every group. Louisiana had a number of tribal peoples. There were even some there that have disappeared now. Some may have enlisted as individuals, but just about every tribe in Louisiana tried to ride it out without taking sides.

              Tribal Groups in Louisiana included: Attakapa (near Lake Charles), Chickasaws in three areas (biggest is around Jena), Chitimacha near Baldwin, Houma in the swamps around Houma, Coushatta (Creek clan near Elton), Tunica-Biloxi (near Marksville) and the Lipan Apache near (Los Adaes).

              The Civil War also tore Tribal Nations apart. Many Oklahoma Nations had Treaty and No Treaty factions. Basically there were some very mad people that did not like Oklahoma compared to the Deep South they came from. The Confederate Government even had the Eastern Band of the Cherokee attack some of its white neighbors because they preferred Union rule.

              Lots of tales not enough time.

              Pruitt
              Pruitt, you are truly an expert! Kelt06

              Have you been struck by the jawbone of an ASS lately?

              by Khepesh "This is the logic of Pruitt"

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              • #8
                Stand Watie Brigadier General OF CSA, was a Cherokee


                à vaincre sans péril, on triomphe sans gloire (triumph without peril brings no glory) P. Corneille

                Le probleme avec les cons, c'est qu'il ne se fatiguent jamais
                (The problem with Pr.cks, is that they never get tired ) Michel Audiard

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                • #9
                  I do believe that the Cherokee nation, in return for an alliance with the CSA, was allowed to send delegates to the Congress at Richmond. However, as has been pointed out above, if the South had won the war I am skeptical of their willingness to keep their obligations to the Cherokee and other Native American groups who sided with the Confederacy.
                  There cannot be a crisis next week. My schedule is already full. -Henry Kissinger

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