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  • Texas in the Civil War

    Interesting and Important battle that is not mentioned in many discussions.

    Union Invasion of Texas stopped at Sabine Pass
    On September 8, 1863, at Sabine Pass, Texas, Lt. Richard W. Dowling and the Davis Guard defeated the forces of General Nathaniel P. Banks and Admiral G. Farragut under the command of General William G. Franklin in a Confederate victory described by President Jefferson Davis as being "without parallel in ancient or modern warfare."

    General Banks, commander of the Department of the Gulf, placed 15,000 men for this campaign under the immediate command of General Franklin who sailed August 29, 1863, from New Orleans with 5,000 soldiers on 18 transports of various types. The westward bound convoy was escorted by four heavily armed gunboats; the Cliffon, Sachem, Arizona and Granite City. Franklin was to sail up the Sabine Pass, land in the vicinity of Sabine City, advance to Beaumont seizing the railroad, and take Houston and Galveston from the North. The additional 10,000 men left in reserve would be brought from New Orleans to overcome all resistance in Texas.

    The poorly defined Union rendezvous at the mouth of Sabine Pass was discovered and the act of surprise was lost. By September 6, the Confederate defenders knew a large Union force was approaching and although the Davis Guard had permission to withdraw, they decided to defend the earthen fort. Because Captain Odlum was acting as area commander in Sabine City, actual command at Fort Griffin fell to his young lieutenant, Richard W. (Dick) Dowling.

    The defending Confederates watched the Union gunboats advance up the Pass during the night of September 7. Next morning the Union guns shelled Fort Griffin, but Dowling withheld his fire until mid-afternoon when the attacking Sachem was only 1200 yards away. With one of their first rounds, the Davis Guard disabled the Sachem and then shifted fire to the Clifton. In 45 minutes the two vessels surrendered and the remaining Union gunboats and transports fled in panic to the Gulf and to New Orleans. The Davis Guard suffered no casualties; the invading forces lost about 50 killed and 350 prisoners.

    The incredible success of the Davis Guard gave heart to the Confederate forces. Dick Dowling and his men received commendation from their commanding generals, the Confederate Congress and President Davis. Texas remained an active state in the Confederacy.
    CSA Ancestors-R.T.Conner&J.J.Sowell-1st TEXAS Inf./J.W.Conner-14th TEXAS Cav/J.T. Crawford-17th Cons.TEXAS Dismtd Cav/John & Hezekiah Williams-4th TEXAS Cav./Jack Williams-1st Reg.Cav.TEXAS State Troops
    Federal Ancestors-By the Grace of GOD-0

  • #2
    Originally posted by PROUD TEXAN View Post
    Interesting and Important battle that is not mentioned in many discussions.

    Union Invasion of Texas stopped at Sabine Pass
    On September 8, 1863, at Sabine Pass, Texas, Lt. Richard W. Dowling and the Davis Guard defeated the forces of General Nathaniel P. Banks and Admiral G. Farragut under the command of General William G. Franklin in a Confederate victory described by President Jefferson Davis as being "without parallel in ancient or modern warfare."

    General Banks, commander of the Department of the Gulf, placed 15,000 men for this campaign under the immediate command of General Franklin who sailed August 29, 1863, from New Orleans with 5,000 soldiers on 18 transports of various types. The westward bound convoy was escorted by four heavily armed gunboats; the Cliffon, Sachem, Arizona and Granite City. Franklin was to sail up the Sabine Pass, land in the vicinity of Sabine City, advance to Beaumont seizing the railroad, and take Houston and Galveston from the North. The additional 10,000 men left in reserve would be brought from New Orleans to overcome all resistance in Texas.

    The poorly defined Union rendezvous at the mouth of Sabine Pass was discovered and the act of surprise was lost. By September 6, the Confederate defenders knew a large Union force was approaching and although the Davis Guard had permission to withdraw, they decided to defend the earthen fort. Because Captain Odlum was acting as area commander in Sabine City, actual command at Fort Griffin fell to his young lieutenant, Richard W. (Dick) Dowling.

    The defending Confederates watched the Union gunboats advance up the Pass during the night of September 7. Next morning the Union guns shelled Fort Griffin, but Dowling withheld his fire until mid-afternoon when the attacking Sachem was only 1200 yards away. With one of their first rounds, the Davis Guard disabled the Sachem and then shifted fire to the Clifton. In 45 minutes the two vessels surrendered and the remaining Union gunboats and transports fled in panic to the Gulf and to New Orleans. The Davis Guard suffered no casualties; the invading forces lost about 50 killed and 350 prisoners.

    The incredible success of the Davis Guard gave heart to the Confederate forces. Dick Dowling and his men received commendation from their commanding generals, the Confederate Congress and President Davis. Texas remained an active state in the Confederacy.
    Now there's a real braintrust for you - Banks and Franklin!
    I come here to discuss a piece of business with you and what are you gonna do? You're gonna tell me fairy tales? James Caan in the movie "Thief" ca 1981

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    • #3
      Originally posted by TomDeFranco View Post
      Now there's a real braintrust for you - Banks and Franklin!
      Almost as bad as Pillow & Floyd.
      The muffled drums sad roll has beat the soldier's last tatoo. No more on life's parade shall meet that brave and fallen few.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by TomDeFranco View Post
        Now there's a real braintrust for you - Banks and Franklin!
        Of the 14 Union officers who received the Thanks of Congress during the Civil War, Nathaniel P. Banks was the least entitled. Serving under five different party labels during his political career, he rose from a childhood job in a cotton mill in his native Massachusetts-which earned him the nickname "Bobbin Boy"-to become speaker of the state legislature's lower house, U.S. congressman and just before the war, governor. As a political appointee, he was named a major general of volunteers. His field career was rather dismal. With no prior military experience, he was in divisional and departmental command near Washington early in the war. In the Shenandoah Valley he was routed by Stonewall Jackson and due to his tremendous loss of supplies was dubbed "Commissary Banks" by the Confederates.
        As part of Pope's army, he was again defeated at Cedar Mountain by Jackson and was at 2nd Bull Run. After a brief stint in the capital's defenses he went to New Orleans to replace Benjamin F. Butler. His operations against Port Hudson met with several bloody repulses but the place eventually fell after the surrender of Vicksburg made it untenable.

        Go's to prove it's Not WHAT you know but WHO you know.
        CSA Ancestors-R.T.Conner&J.J.Sowell-1st TEXAS Inf./J.W.Conner-14th TEXAS Cav/J.T. Crawford-17th Cons.TEXAS Dismtd Cav/John & Hezekiah Williams-4th TEXAS Cav./Jack Williams-1st Reg.Cav.TEXAS State Troops
        Federal Ancestors-By the Grace of GOD-0

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by PROUD TEXAN View Post
          Of the 14 Union officers who received the Thanks of Congress during the Civil War, Nathaniel P. Banks was the least entitled. Serving under five different party labels during his political career, he rose from a childhood job in a cotton mill in his native Massachusetts-which earned him the nickname "Bobbin Boy"-to become speaker of the state legislature's lower house, U.S. congressman and just before the war, governor. As a political appointee, he was named a major general of volunteers. His field career was rather dismal. With no prior military experience, he was in divisional and departmental command near Washington early in the war. In the Shenandoah Valley he was routed by Stonewall Jackson and due to his tremendous loss of supplies was dubbed "Commissary Banks" by the Confederates.
          As part of Pope's army, he was again defeated at Cedar Mountain by Jackson and was at 2nd Bull Run. After a brief stint in the capital's defenses he went to New Orleans to replace Benjamin F. Butler. His operations against Port Hudson met with several bloody repulses but the place eventually fell after the surrender of Vicksburg made it untenable.

          Go's to prove it's Not WHAT you know but WHO you know.
          As a field general, perhaps he should have been nicknamed "bobbin brain". That said, A.P. Hill saved Jackson at Cedar Mountain. If he did not, Jackson would have had the ignominious destinction of having lost to Banks.
          I come here to discuss a piece of business with you and what are you gonna do? You're gonna tell me fairy tales? James Caan in the movie "Thief" ca 1981

          Comment


          • #6
            Come on guys, Banks DID beat Jackson in one battle in the Valley. Can any of you guess which one?

            Banks in Louisiana was saddled with some second rate talent. He did not get superior troops until Sherman offered him a Division of his after Vicksburg! The New Englanders in Banks' Army underperformed in Louisiana.

            Franklin had failed in a lot of battles before being sent to the Gulf, but he still finished second in his class at West Point. Someone thought Franklin would supply the military background Banks lacked.

            Nobody in Blue out generaled Richard Taylor. Kirby Smith is the only guy that could stop him.

            One of the gunboats grounded on the Louisiana side and the Yankees jumped off and ran into the Swamp. They came back in the next few days begging to be taken prisoner!

            Robert, are you going to do Galveston?

            Pruitt
            Pruitt, you are truly an expert! Kelt06

            Have you been struck by the jawbone of an ASS lately?

            by Khepesh "This is the logic of Pruitt"

            Comment


            • #7
              I hope to do Galveston;work permiting. I'm surprised that more input has not taken place on this thread concerning this battle. If the battle would have ended otherwise, the war may have taken a turn concerning duration and troop movements/tactics used for the remainder of the war.
              CSA Ancestors-R.T.Conner&J.J.Sowell-1st TEXAS Inf./J.W.Conner-14th TEXAS Cav/J.T. Crawford-17th Cons.TEXAS Dismtd Cav/John & Hezekiah Williams-4th TEXAS Cav./Jack Williams-1st Reg.Cav.TEXAS State Troops
              Federal Ancestors-By the Grace of GOD-0

              Comment


              • #8
                I understand. The key feature of landing here is there is a railhead not far away. The Union forces could not force their way in through Galveston, as they had to cross a long causeway. Once a large force was landed and had access to the rail system, Texas could not have adequately defended itself. Like in Louisiana, almost all of her troops were serving out of state.

                Pruitt
                Pruitt, you are truly an expert! Kelt06

                Have you been struck by the jawbone of an ASS lately?

                by Khepesh "This is the logic of Pruitt"

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by TomDeFranco View Post
                  As a field general, perhaps he should have been nicknamed "bobbin brain". That said, A.P. Hill saved Jackson at Cedar Mountain. If he did not, Jackson would have had the ignominious destinction of having lost to Banks.
                  More "ifs". But Jackson wasn't whipped. Do you believe that?
                  In all my perplexities and distresses, the Bible has never failed to give me light and strength.
                  Robert E. Lee

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by B7B Southern View Post
                    More "ifs". But Jackson wasn't whipped. Do you believe that?
                    What "if"? He was whipped until A.P. Hill saved his hide. Jackson had a habit of feeding his men into battle piecemeal and they paid a hefty price for it.
                    I come here to discuss a piece of business with you and what are you gonna do? You're gonna tell me fairy tales? James Caan in the movie "Thief" ca 1981

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Pruitt View Post
                      Come on guys, Banks DID beat Jackson in one battle in the Valley. Can any of you guess which one?

                      Pruitt
                      Are you giving him credit for Kernstown? I thought that was Shields.
                      I come here to discuss a piece of business with you and what are you gonna do? You're gonna tell me fairy tales? James Caan in the movie "Thief" ca 1981

                      Comment

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