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  • Originally posted by daddut roger View Post
    what the Germans learned from the US civil war was the use of machine guns
    Each company had its machine gun section
    the French did not believe in this new weapon just as they did not believe in tanks
    the result is that during the offensives at Chemin des Dames they encountered positions protected by machine-gun nests under cover which caused enormous losses (in addition to ineffective artillery fire due to a lack of heavy guns)
    the offensives were doomed in advance to failure, or their successes could only come at a high cost in human lives
    Actually, what the Prussians learned from the American Civil War, after Moltke denigrated the fighting, was the use of railroads for logistics. He added a railroad section to the Prussian General Staff.
    We are not now that strength which in old days
    Moved earth and heaven; that which we are we are; One equal temper of heroic hearts
    Made weak by time and fate but strong in will
    To strive to seek to find and not to yield.

    Comment


    • Originally posted by Mountain Man View Post
      I would say no. I think such a trial would have led to further acts of violence and rebellion. It would also have called into question the states' right to secede which was legal at the time of the Civil War.
      The Rebels had just been defeated. Hundreds of thousands dead, Large Union armies stationed throughout the South. Would there have been the will among the remaining rebels to 'continue the struggle' if the Confederate leaders had been tried?
      "To be free is better than to be unfree - always."

      Comment


      • Originally posted by D1J1 View Post
        Wow! Talk about thread drift! We may just have this forum's winner!

        Carry on!

        Regards,
        Dennis
        Alas, a winner!
        Politics is the art of looking for trouble, finding it everywhere, diagnosing it incorrectly and applying the wrong remedies.

        Comment


        • Originally posted by Surrey View Post

          The Rebels had just been defeated. Hundreds of thousands dead, Large Union armies stationed throughout the South. Would there have been the will among the remaining rebels to 'continue the struggle' if the Confederate leaders had been tried?
          Guerilla raids, assassinations and the like could have gone on and on. Worse than a war, as we have learned all too well.
          Quis Custodiet Ipsos Custodes? Who is watching the watchers?

          Comment


          • Originally posted by Mountain Man View Post

            Guerilla raids, assassinations and the like could have gone on and on. Worse than a war, as we have learned all too well.
            They did, and have gone on.
            Politics is the art of looking for trouble, finding it everywhere, diagnosing it incorrectly and applying the wrong remedies.

            Comment


            • Originally posted by Surrey View Post

              The Rebels had just been defeated. Hundreds of thousands dead, Large Union armies stationed throughout the South. Would there have been the will among the remaining rebels to 'continue the struggle' if the Confederate leaders had been tried?
              The southern states were members of the union before and after the war, why shouldn't federal bases be in the south?
              There are still bases in the southern states and generate billions of dollars in revenue for local businesses.
              The south was never a nation, it was an area under control of rebel forces. Rebel leaders are routinely tried after failed rebellions. Why should the confederates be treated any different? They made the choice, they should pay the price.
              Politics is the art of looking for trouble, finding it everywhere, diagnosing it incorrectly and applying the wrong remedies.

              Comment


              • Originally posted by Urban hermit View Post

                The southern states were members of the union before and after the war, why shouldn't federal bases be in the south?
                There are still bases in the southern states and generate billions of dollars in revenue for local businesses.
                The south was never a nation, it was an area under control of rebel forces. Rebel leaders are routinely tried after failed rebellions. Why should the confederates be treated any different? They made the choice, they should pay the price.
                My point was that the presence of Union troops in the immediate aftermath of the war would act as a deterrent to any future rebellion. Any new attempts could be quickly stamped on.
                "To be free is better than to be unfree - always."

                Comment


                • Besides, the Southerners must have had it bad, most of the "occupation troops" were U.S.C.T. Some of these regiments existed until 1867 ... In 1869, there were only 2 Cavalry Regiments and 2 Infantry (the so-called Buffalo Soldiers)
                  Yep, the federal government had to think about finding a place for the "freedmen"

                  Comment


                  • Originally posted by daddut roger View Post
                    Besides, the Southerners must have had it bad, most of the "occupation troops" were U.S.C.T. Some of these regiments existed until 1867 ... In 1869, there were only 2 Cavalry Regiments and 2 Infantry (the so-called Buffalo Soldiers)
                    Yep, the federal government had to think about finding a place for the "freedmen"
                    Because of the excellent service by the black regiments in the Civil War, it was decided to have six black regiments on the regular army rolls, two cavalry and four infantry. That was later amended to two of each. The two cavalry regiments, the 9th and 10th US Cavalry became excellent regiments, one of them commanded by Benjamin Grierson, who had led the most effective cavalry raid of the war during the Vicksburg Campaign. He stayed in the army after the war and commanded his regiment with skill against the Apaches, no mean feat.

                    One of his officers, Lt Henry O. Flipper, was the first black graduate of the United States Military Academy at West Point where he endured four years of prejudice and racism. He was an excellent officer, well thought of by Grierson, and was framed by a senior officer in the regiment of embezzlement while Grierson was not present. What the actual 'problem' was had nothing to do with money or funds, but that Flipper was seeing a white woman which incensed some of the officers in the regiment. Flipper was court-martialed and cashiered and went on to become a renowned engineer in the west. He designed, for example, the drainage system for Fort Sill, Oklahoma which is still there and is known as 'Flipper's Ditch.' The army lost a good man and an excellent officer because of mindless prejudice and racism.
                    We are not now that strength which in old days
                    Moved earth and heaven; that which we are we are; One equal temper of heroic hearts
                    Made weak by time and fate but strong in will
                    To strive to seek to find and not to yield.

                    Comment


                    • Originally posted by daddut roger View Post
                      Besides, the Southerners must have had it bad, most of the "occupation troops" were U.S.C.T. Some of these regiments existed until 1867 ... In 1869, there were only 2 Cavalry Regiments and 2 Infantry (the so-called Buffalo Soldiers)
                      Yep, the federal government had to think about finding a place for the "freedmen"
                      My g. g. g. Uncle Hubert commanded the 103rd USCT

                      [QUOTE]Organized at Hilton Head. S.C., March 10, 1865. Attached to District of Savannah, Ga., Dept. of the South, to June, 1865. Dept. of the South to April, 1866.
                      SERVICE.--Garrison and guard duty at Savannah, Ga., and at various points in Georgia and South Carolina entire term. Mustered out April 15-20, 1866.
                      /QUOTE]
                      Last edited by Urban hermit; 21 Jul 20, 20:03.
                      Politics is the art of looking for trouble, finding it everywhere, diagnosing it incorrectly and applying the wrong remedies.

                      Comment


                      • [QUOTE=Urban hermit;n5209007]

                        My g. g. uncle Hubert commanded the 103rd USCT

                        Organized at Hilton Head. S.C., March 10, 1865. Attached to District of Savannah, Ga., Dept. of the South, to June, 1865. Dept. of the South to April, 1866.
                        SERVICE.--Garrison and guard duty at Savannah, Ga., and at various points in Georgia and South Carolina entire term. Mustered out April 15-20, 1ha866.
                        /QUOTE]
                        The 35th USCT had postwar duty here and in the region during the war. Did not check to see if they were in the same brigade, etc.

                        Great information. Thanks for telling us.

                        Regards,
                        Dennis
                        If stupid was a criminal offense Sea Lion believers would be doing life.

                        Shouting out to Half Pint for bringing back the big mugs!

                        Comment


                        • [QUOTE=D1J1;n5209012]
                          Originally posted by Urban hermit View Post

                          My g. g. uncle Hubert commanded the 103rd USCT



                          The 35th USCT had postwar duty here and in the region during the war. Did not check to see if they were in the same brigade, etc.

                          Great information. Thanks for telling us.

                          Regards,
                          Dennis
                          I forgot to add one "g" lol....Hubert was a Sargant in the 157th New York Infantry, taken prisoner at Gettysburg on July 1, escaped on the 6th of July, before being assigned to the 103rd. He spent the rest of his life after the war as a fireman in NYC.
                          Politics is the art of looking for trouble, finding it everywhere, diagnosing it incorrectly and applying the wrong remedies.

                          Comment

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