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The Solution to the Riddle, "Why did Longstreet outrank Jackson?"

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  • grognard
    replied
    Originally posted by American87 View Post

    Lee and Jackson got him moving. They were the blacksmiths.
    jackso was defending against attacks, , when Lee went to Longstreet to say it was time to attack, Longstreet had already set the attack in motion--checlk any good book on the battle.

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  • American87
    replied
    Originally posted by grognard View Post

    Longstreet launched the attack, that is the hammer, not the anvil!
    Lee and Jackson got him moving. They were the blacksmiths.

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  • grognard
    replied
    Originally posted by bill shack View Post
    actually the hammer and the anvil describe the battle of the 2nd manassas perfectly , longstreet the anvil and jackson the hammer.
    Longstreet launched the attack, that is the hammer, not the anvil!

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  • bill shack
    replied
    actually the hammer and the anvil describe the battle of the 2nd manassas perfectly , longstreet the anvil and jackson the hammer.

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  • grognard
    replied
    Hammer and anvil don't really describe the situation when both were under Lee in battle, except once. Antietam and Fredericksburg were defense, and Longstreet was the hammer at 2nd Manassas.

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  • T. A. Gardner
    replied
    When you had just Lee, Longstreet and Jackson, the chemistry of command worked. Longstreet was reliable and steady. His corps was the anvil against which Jackson could deliver a hammer blow. Jackson, much like Patton in WW 2, was more aggressive. But, that aggressiveness rode a fine line where it could turn into recklessness. As a top general, Longstreet had the better qualities while Jackson really needed someone to keep his becoming overly aggressive in check.

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  • bill shack
    replied
    Jackson , did make some very grave errors, 1) at the battle of the peninsular(7-days) he was very slow and did not support longstreet. he dilly dallied fixing a bridge when he could have just walked across. 2) at fredericksburg he almost lost the battle

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  • Massena
    replied
    Originally posted by American87 View Post

    So was his hero Washington. I guess Lee refused to side with the Union as long as it was attacking his home state. Had Virginia sided with the national flag, I doubt he would've joined the Confederacy.
    Are you saying that Washington was for 'Virginia first'? If that was so he would not have agreed to becoming president of the Constitutional Convention nor being president of the US.

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  • Half Pint John
    replied
    Originally posted by American87 View Post

    So was his hero Washington. I guess Lee refused to side with the Union as long as it was attacking his home state. Had Virginia sided with the national flag, I doubt he would've joined the Confederacy.
    There your mistaking. The Union was attacked first and before Lee made his decision to go with the South. He and his states decision brought ruin to VA, the state with the most battle fields.

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  • American87
    replied
    Originally posted by Tuebor View Post

    Not an expert on his forbears, but Daddy was a big "unionist." Not sure where Bobbie got his Virginia First idealism.
    So was his hero Washington. I guess Lee refused to side with the Union as long as it was attacking his home state. Had Virginia sided with the national flag, I doubt he would've joined the Confederacy.

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  • Tuebor
    replied
    Originally posted by Half Pint John View Post

    SO, no big deal. Means next to nothing. Except those signers where for unity while Robert was for disunity. I doubt that the signers would have been happy with their relation
    Not an expert on his forbears, but Daddy was a big "unionist." Not sure where Bobbie got his Virginia First idealism.

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  • Half Pint John
    replied
    Only my opinion but the CSA would have been better serviced with Longstreet in command.

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  • Half Pint John
    replied
    Originally posted by American87 View Post
    Robert E. Lee was related to 5 of the 7 Virginia delegates who signed the Declaration of Independence.
    SO, no big deal. Means next to nothing. Except those signers where for unity while Robert was for disunity. I doubt that the signers would have been happy with their relation

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  • American87
    replied
    Robert E. Lee was related to 5 of the 7 Virginia delegates who signed the Declaration of Independence.

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  • Massena
    replied
    Source(s)?

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