Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Battle of Carthage, Mo

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Battle of Carthage, Mo

    Sunday we stopped by Carthage, Missouri to visit the site of one of the first land engagements of the ACW. The battle on July 5, 1861 pitted Franz Sigel and 2 regiments of Missouri volunteers (1100 men) against approximately 4000 Missouri State Guard under the command of Governor Jackson.

    Full album at webshots

    Sigel had marched from St Louis to Cartage with the aim of keeping Jackson from joining forces with Confederate trrops (notably McCulloch's command) in Arkansas. Encamped in Carthage on the evening of July 4 at Carter Springs, Sigel marches 10 miles North of Carthage and meets Jackson as he moves South.

    The battle lasts most of the day. Beginning with the Union deploying North of Double Trouble Creek, Sigel brings his artillery into action and holds his position until both flanks appear threatened by the numerically superior Confederates. This is followed by a series of stands at Dry Fork, Buck Branch and Spring River and finishes with an engagement within the town of Carthage.

    The day ends with Sigel disengaging and marching in good order towards Sarcokie while the rebels encamp in the same area in which he had pitched his tents the night before.

    While a victory for the Confederates, the action shows Sigel holding his own against a numerically superior host and maintaining the combat effectiveness of his troops.

    The battle field is marked on the East edge of Carthage with a State Historical Site (the Union encampment prior to and the Confederate encampment after the battle), markers and a museum near the courthouse and a string of three markers along Civil War Avenue - the axis of the fight as it moved from North to South and back into Carthage.

    The Northern end of the field near where Sigel deployed


    Looking South along Civil War Avenue in the direction of Dry Fork (not sure why I do not have a picture facing North across the field towards the Confederate positions)


    Marker at the site of the Union lines at Dry Fork. This is where the heaviest fighting of the day occurred.

    (will post terrain pics tomorrow)

    Marker at the site of the final Union line outside of Carthage at Quarry Hill - this stand allowed the Sigel to move the main body of his troops across Spring River and back into Carthage.

    (will post terrain pics tomorrow)

    The markers at the courthouse in Carthage. The original courthouse was used as a field hospital. It was destroyed later in the war and replaced with the modern structure.

    Last edited by traygreen; 01 Aug 07, 19:27.
    Tray Green

    www.abandofgamers.com

    Battlefield Tours for Wargamers
    Normandy 2007
    ACW Border Wars 2008
    Bulge 2008

  • #2
    Once again, great pictures Tray. You rule!
    Beer is proof that God loves us and wants us to be happy.

    Comment


    • #3
      I can't wait to get some time to visit more of the sites here in Missouri...

      Excellent pics...
      Civil War in Missouri and Kansas
      If I cared for my life I would have lost it long ago; wanting to lose it I cannot throw it away.-- William T. "Bloody Bill" Anderson

      Comment


      • #4
        Was there 4 years a go and was a great site.
        Just a note anyone want to guess what color of uniforms a lot of the federal troops wore?
        If you guessed gray you would be right.
        Go figure.
        Jim"Doc" Bruce
        "War Means Fightin and fightnin means killin"
        Nathan Bedford Forrest.
        "Audacity, more audacity and always audacity"
        George Patton

        Comment


        • #5
          Reading The Battle of Carthage by David Hinze and Karen Farnham right now. Well worth the time if you are interested in the battle or the Trans-Mississippi theater in general.
          Tray Green

          www.abandofgamers.com

          Battlefield Tours for Wargamers
          Normandy 2007
          ACW Border Wars 2008
          Bulge 2008

          Comment


          • #6
            Got pulled away from The Battle of Carthage by David Hinze and Karen Farnham by my partners reminding me that I needed to finish some reading for the Normandy trip this Oct. Finally got back around to finishing the book yesterday and am more interested in the battle now then when I started.

            Sigel was advancing against a numerically superior enemy with no cavalry and little more than local intelligence on the location and disposition of Jackson's State Guard. The authors make a pretty compelling case that but for the total lack of leadership on the part of Jackson's army, Sigel's command, by all rights, should have been much more soundly defeated.

            Jackson retired from the front as the initial deployments were going on, nominally to provide leadership to the 2000+ unarmed volunteers that had joined the Guard. This coupled with Rines (who may have been given command authority) placing himself on the Rebel right flank and operating as a regimental cavalry commander (albeit one that bordered on incompetent) left the 4 "divisions" of the Missouri State Guard operating as independent commands.

            We are getting ready to game Carthage in 15mm & I am really inclined to come up with some fairly onerous command and control rules to tie the hands of the Southern forces... any thoughts?
            Tray Green

            www.abandofgamers.com

            Battlefield Tours for Wargamers
            Normandy 2007
            ACW Border Wars 2008
            Bulge 2008

            Comment


            • #7
              Thanks for your time and efforts Tray - nice pics .
              SPORTS FREAK/ PANZERBLITZ COMMANDER/ CC2 COMMANDER

              Comment

              Latest Topics

              Collapse

              Working...
              X