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U.S.Grant's growth as a General.

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  • U.S.Grant's growth as a General.

    Good read.

    https://ehistory.osu.edu/articles/us...d-operations-0
    In all my perplexities and distresses, the Bible has never failed to give me light and strength.
    Robert E. Lee

  • #2
    Nice, thanks!

    Regards,
    Dennis
    If stupid was a criminal offense Sea Lion believers would be doing life.

    Shouting out to Half Pint for bringing back the big mugs!

    Comment


    • #3
      Yep, a good post and link.

      Plus it's from The Ohio State University.
      Beer is proof that God loves us and wants us to be happy.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by R. Evans View Post
        Yep, a good post and link.

        Plus it's from The Ohio State University.
        U.va can take care of them!
        In all my perplexities and distresses, the Bible has never failed to give me light and strength.
        Robert E. Lee

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by B7B Southern View Post
          U.va can take care of them!


          In basketball, probably. In football, no freakin' way!!
          Beer is proof that God loves us and wants us to be happy.

          Comment


          • #6
            Good read.

            I don't agree with the comparison between Chattanooga and Chancellorsville. A lot of what the author says is true, but Grants operations during that battle were minimal, while Chancellorsville was largely Lee's doing.
            Perhaps mentioning the Cracker Line would've been instructive.

            I also think the author puts too much emphasis on Grants operations outside Petersburg. He states that Grant never wanted to use attrition, and that the lines of Petersburg were broken because Grant stretched them too thin. Yet Grant in his report says attrition would be his plan if he couldn't fight in the open, and both his incessant action and Shermans March contributed to wear down Lee's manpower and supplies. I realize this may be the strategic level of thinking, but it explains why Grants operations were so successful.

            And I think the author could've dwelled more on Grants operations at Vicksburg. Grants running of the batteries, his drive to Jackson, his subsequent drive to Vicksburg, his investment of the city, and his double front with Sherman facing the rear, were all operations and all carried the campaign.

            Overall I agree that Grant was strong in operations. His skill in this area carried him to the rank of Lieutenant General, and he was able to combine it with his strategic skill to defeat Lee.
            "It is a fine fox chase, my boys"

            "It is well that war is so terrible-we would grow too fond of it"

            Comment


            • #7
              I have repeatedly stated that IMHO Lee in 1865 was essentially the same general that he was in June, 1862. Grant, on the other hand, learned as the Conflict progressed (and I yield to no one in my admiration for Lee's generalship). This article documents Grant's progression.
              Don't leave good whiskey for the damn Yankees!" John Hunt Morgan, Eagleport, Ohio, July 23, 1863

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              • #8
                Originally posted by B7B Southern View Post
                U.va can take care of them!
                Maybe VT from time to time, but I am no fan of UVA. That is the snootiness campus I have ever visited! Yeah, I know, thread drift.......

                Best regards,
                Dennis
                If stupid was a criminal offense Sea Lion believers would be doing life.

                Shouting out to Half Pint for bringing back the big mugs!

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by D1J1 View Post
                  Maybe VT from time to time, but I am no fan of UVA. That is the snootiness campus I have ever visited! Yeah, I know, thread drift.......

                  Best regards,
                  Dennis
                  You didn't talk like a yankee, did you?
                  In all my perplexities and distresses, the Bible has never failed to give me light and strength.
                  Robert E. Lee

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Grant had the advantage at the beginning of the war as he was a regimental commander and was able to relearn his profession and not being a general officer yet.
                    We are not now that strength which in old days
                    Moved earth and heaven; that which we are we are; One equal temper of heroic hearts
                    Made weak by time and fate but strong in will
                    To strive to seek to find and not to yield.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by B7B Southern View Post
                      You didn't talk like a yankee, did you?
                      Of course! Those folks have to learn properly sometime!

                      Regards,
                      Dennis
                      If stupid was a criminal offense Sea Lion believers would be doing life.

                      Shouting out to Half Pint for bringing back the big mugs!

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Massena View Post
                        Grant had the advantage at the beginning of the war as he was a regimental commander and was able to relearn his profession and not being a general officer yet.
                        Yet Grant was promoted Brigadier General very quickly and before he'd commanded his regiment out of camp. His first action (Belmont) was a debacle and it's debatable whether he commanded any action at Fort Donelson* or Shiloh**. Certainly in later actions he did not command any tactical action at all***.

                        *At Ft Donelson his main contribution, after returning to the field having been absent most of the battle, was to assent to McClernand's suggestions that CF Smith should attack.

                        ** It's very unclear whether Grant, after returning to the field having been absent most of the battle, had any influence on the course of the battle. Of course there was a running dispute between partisans of the two armies about whether or not Buell effectively assumed command upon arrival despite seniority.

                        *** Certainly Grant was a non-entity at Iuka, 2nd Corinth etc. and the first action he was on the field commanding was Champion Hill where he didn't perform well. Grant had an authoritarian command style which inhibited the initiative of his subordinates, but also suffered from "tunnel vision" which limited his situational awareness.
                        "[T]he worst that could be said of the Peninsula campaign was that thus far it had not been successful. To make it a failure was reserved for the agency of General Halleck." -Emory Upton

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                        • #13
                          Once again, sources?
                          We are not now that strength which in old days
                          Moved earth and heaven; that which we are we are; One equal temper of heroic hearts
                          Made weak by time and fate but strong in will
                          To strive to seek to find and not to yield.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by 67th Tigers View Post
                            Yet Grant was promoted Brigadier General very quickly and before he'd commanded his regiment out of camp. His first action (Belmont) was a debacle and it's debatable whether he commanded any action at Fort Donelson* or Shiloh**. Certainly in later actions he did not command any tactical action at all***.

                            *At Ft Donelson his main contribution, after returning to the field having been absent most of the battle, was to assent to McClernand's suggestions that CF Smith should attack.

                            ** It's very unclear whether Grant, after returning to the field having been absent most of the battle, had any influence on the course of the battle. Of course there was a running dispute between partisans of the two armies about whether or not Buell effectively assumed command upon arrival despite seniority.

                            *** Certainly Grant was a non-entity at Iuka, 2nd Corinth etc. and the first action he was on the field commanding was Champion Hill where he didn't perform well. Grant had an authoritarian command style which inhibited the initiative of his subordinates, but also suffered from "tunnel vision" which limited his situational awareness.
                            Are you not just repeating yourself here from earlier threads?
                            We are not now that strength which in old days
                            Moved earth and heaven; that which we are we are; One equal temper of heroic hearts
                            Made weak by time and fate but strong in will
                            To strive to seek to find and not to yield.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by 67th Tigers View Post
                              Yet Grant was promoted Brigadier General very quickly and before he'd commanded his regiment out of camp...
                              The point is he had an opportunity to relearn his profession in command of a regiment. Where it was is irrelevant. He assumed command of an undisciplined group of new soldiers and turned it into a trained and disciplined infantry regiment.

                              Grant had seen combat in the Mexican War and understood what being shot at was like. It was making a regiment out of a bunch of recruits, including the officers, that gave him the opportunity of being back in the service and doing his job.

                              Grant understood the differences between regulars and the new volunteers and acted accordingly. He also emphasized the training of his officers and in that taught them what their duties and responsibilities were. That's how you make good units.
                              We are not now that strength which in old days
                              Moved earth and heaven; that which we are we are; One equal temper of heroic hearts
                              Made weak by time and fate but strong in will
                              To strive to seek to find and not to yield.

                              Comment

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