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Inside the CSS Georgia's armor: ...

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  • Inside the CSS Georgia's armor: ...

    ... Without preferred rolled plate, railroad iron had to do.

    From: THE CIVIL WAR PICKET Blog, contributor Phil Gast.

    http://civil-war-picket.blogspot.ca/...r-without.html

    "The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers’ Savannah office, in charge of removing the wreckage in the Savannah River as part of a massive harbor deepening project, released a photograph of a cross section of one of the three casemate chunks remaining on the river bottom.

    There they are. Five sliced pieces of T-shaped railroad track wedged in an iron box, corrosion and river sediment filling the gaps. Wow.:

    1) huge photo of CSS Georgia armor recovered from the Savannah River:


    2) diagram of armor cross section:



    So, "railroad iron" armor is exactly what it says, formed from iron rails; huge photo, hugely illuminating & really cool.
    Last edited by Marmat; 17 Dec 15, 13:05.
    "I am Groot"
    - Groot

  • #2
    Very interesting...not what I expected at all. Great post!
    Quis Custodiet Ipsos Custodes? Who is watching the watchers?

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    • #3
      The South were really on their uppers as a number of ironclads are documented as armoured with railway lines. As they were incapable of rolling new rails this meant sacrificing parts of their transport and logistics infrastructure something about which JD was constantly fulminating
      Human history becomes more and more a race between education and catastrophe (H G Wells)
      Mit der Dummheit kaempfen Goetter selbst vergebens (Friedrich von Schiller)

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      • #4
        That is awesome. I have always pictured the armor that way for the CSS Arkansas!
        “I do not wish to have the slave emancipated because I love him, but because I hate his master."
        --Salmon P. Chase

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        • #5
          Originally posted by MarkV View Post
          The South were really on their uppers as a number of ironclads are documented as armoured with railway lines. As they were incapable of rolling new rails this meant sacrificing parts of their transport and logistics infrastructure something about which JD was constantly fulminating
          Not incapable. Just didn't produce much.

          http://www.csa-railroads.com/
          {}

          "Any story sounds true until someone tells the other side and sets the record straight." -Proverbs 18:17

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          • #6
            That's an incredible cross section. I wonder if all that weight on the upper casemates would make the CSS GEORGIA a bit top heavy and unstable in any kind of a seaway.
            ARRRR! International Talk Like A Pirate Day - September 19th
            IN MARE IN COELO

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            • #7
              Very interesting. I has never heard of this before. It's an ingenious stop gap solution but it also does a good job of showing the desperate state that the South was in.
              "Artillery lends dignity to what might otherwise be a vulgar brawl." - Frederick the Great

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Jose50 View Post
                That's an incredible cross section. I wonder if all that weight on the upper casemates would make the CSS GEORGIA a bit top heavy and unstable in any kind of a seaway.
                Mostly river bound... right .
                SPORTS FREAK/ PANZERBLITZ COMMANDER/ CC2 COMMANDER

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                • #9
                  Correct Greg. Confederate ironclads were designed to function on rivers and in harbors.

                  Regards,
                  Dennis
                  If stupid was a criminal offense Sea Lion believers would be doing life.

                  Shouting out to Half Pint for bringing back the big mugs!

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by frisco17 View Post
                    Very interesting. I has never heard of this before. It's an ingenious stop gap solution but it also does a good job of showing the desperate state that the South was in.
                    Or the ingenuity of a people.
                    “I do not wish to have the slave emancipated because I love him, but because I hate his master."
                    --Salmon P. Chase

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by MarkV View Post
                      The South were really on their uppers as a number of ironclads are documented as armoured with railway lines. As they were incapable of rolling new rails this meant sacrificing parts of their transport and logistics infrastructure something about which JD was constantly fulminating
                      Railroads and the Confederate Navy were at odds over the use of rails and raw iron frequently.
                      “I do not wish to have the slave emancipated because I love him, but because I hate his master."
                      --Salmon P. Chase

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Savez View Post
                        Or the ingenuity of a people.
                        You're both right. Desperation can lead to ingenuity.
                        Beer is proof that God loves us and wants us to be happy.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by R. Evans View Post
                          You're both right. Desperation can lead to ingenuity.
                          Necessity is the mother of invention.
                          The muffled drums sad roll has beat the soldier's last tatoo. No more on life's parade shall meet that brave and fallen few.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Marmat View Post
                            ... Without preferred rolled plate, railroad iron had to do.

                            From: THE CIVIL WAR PICKET Blog, contributor Phil Gast.

                            http://civil-war-picket.blogspot.ca/...r-without.html

                            "The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers’ Savannah office, in charge of removing the wreckage in the Savannah River as part of a massive harbor deepening project, released a photograph of a cross section of one of the three casemate chunks remaining on the river bottom.

                            There they are. Five sliced pieces of T-shaped railroad track wedged in an iron box, corrosion and river sediment filling the gaps. Wow.:

                            1) huge photo of CSS Georgia armor recovered from the Savannah River:


                            2) diagram of armor cross section:



                            So, "railroad iron" armor is exactly what it says, formed from iron rails; huge photo, hugely illuminating & really cool.
                            Great post, thanks for sharing.
                            The muffled drums sad roll has beat the soldier's last tatoo. No more on life's parade shall meet that brave and fallen few.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by hellboy30 View Post
                              Necessity is the mother of invention.
                              That's the quote I was trying to think of and could not remember for some reason.
                              “I do not wish to have the slave emancipated because I love him, but because I hate his master."
                              --Salmon P. Chase

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