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Poll: Hancock's Best Battle?

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  • Poll: Hancock's Best Battle?

    Winfield Scott Hancock "the Superb" was a popular Union commander who rose to command of II Corps, and whose battlefield actions earned him the nickname as the "Thunderbolt" of the Army of the Potomac. He later ran for President, but was defeated by Garfield.

    What was Winfield Hancock's best battlefield or campaign performance and why?

    1. Williamsburg

    2. Antietam

    3. Fredericksburg

    4. Chancellorsville

    5. Gettysburg

    6. The Wilderness

    7. Spotsylvania Courthouse
    20
    Williamsburg
    10.00%
    2
    Antietam
    0.00%
    0
    Fredericksburg
    5.00%
    1
    Chancellorsville
    0.00%
    0
    Gettysburg
    80.00%
    16
    The Wilderness
    0.00%
    0
    Spotsylvania Courthouse
    5.00%
    1
    "Hit hard when you start, but don't start until you have everything ready." - Lt. Gen. James Longstreet

    Pyrrhus Travels West:
    Hanno the Infamous, General of Carthage, Rb Mhnt of Sicily

  • #2
    I admit I don't know a lot about Hancock,but I chose Williamsburg. It seems to be the battle that put his star on the rise. I think he was one of the better commanders in the AOP, but unfortunately wounds and the demands of war sapped him of his abilities. It seems to me from my readings that after Gettysburg he was just a shell of his earlier self.
    Is she crying? There's no crying in baseball.

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    • #3
      I would say Wilderness for degree of difficulty. Hancock launches a well coordinated attack on Lee's left and routes it. The attack stalls when Gregg's Texas brigade shows up as the vanguard of Longstreets corp. Longstreet launches a counter attack on Hancocks flank which is partially rolled up. In a the confusion of a fight in the middle of the woods and facing a flank attack from one of the hardest hitting generals in the war, Hancock manages to take control and stabilize his lines containing the assault. Quite a feat when you consider the C3 problems in the wilderness.

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      • #4
        Wilderness is a close second for me....I had to go with Gettysburg-they didn't call him "The Superb" for nothing.
        The muffled drums sad roll has beat the soldier's last tatoo. No more on life's parade shall meet that brave and fallen few.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by hellboy30 View Post
          Wilderness is a close second for me....I had to go with Gettysburg-they didn't call him "The Superb" for nothing.
          With you on that. Gettysburg was the pinnacle of a great Civil War general's career. Hancock certainly deserved being called "Superb." During those three days in July, 1863, he was the best man on the field.

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          • #6
            I go with G'burg as well...the comments of men on Cemetery Hill upon his arrival says it all.
            2nd day wasn't too bad either, he sent reinforcements to other fronts and still maintained his own.

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            • #7
              Did Hancock remain on the field after being injured on day 3 Gettysburg?

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              • #8
                I'm on Gettysburg as well. The reasons have already been well stated. He was the man there.

                Regards,
                Dennis
                If stupid was a criminal offense Sea Lion believers would be doing life.

                Shouting out to Half Pint for bringing back the big mugs!

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                • #9
                  I agree with Gettysburg as well. Hancock was everywhere for those three days... Wasn't the Wilderness where Longstreet rolled him up "like a wet carpet"? ...


                  Ken

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                  • #10
                    In the spirit of this thread...

                    Cemetery Hill - July 1, 1863



                    Hancock is seen directing Major General A.Doubleday to send his troops to secure Culp's Hill as the embattled Major General O.O. Howard looks on. Around them the troops of dozens of splintered commands begin to rally.
                    My avatar: Center of the Cross of the Légion d'honneur (Legion of Honour) of the First French Empire (Napoleonic Era), 3rd type (awarded between 1806-1808). My Légion d'honneur. :-)

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Zouave View Post
                      In the spirit of this thread...

                      Cemetery Hill - July 1, 1863



                      Hancock is seen directing Major General A.Doubleday to send his troops to secure Culp's Hill as the embattled Major General O.O. Howard looks on. Around them the troops of dozens of splintered commands begin to rally.
                      Gotta love the emotion Troiani puts into the painting. Howard doesn't look too particularly pleased to answer to a junior officer.
                      "Hit hard when you start, but don't start until you have everything ready." - Lt. Gen. James Longstreet

                      Pyrrhus Travels West:
                      Hanno the Infamous, General of Carthage, Rb Mhnt of Sicily

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                      • #12
                        ...2nd & 11th flags??

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                        • #13
                          After the death of Reynolds, John Buford sent a dispatch back to headquarters indicating that "we need a commanding spirit" on the battlefield at Gettysburg. Meade responded by sending Hancock to take command of the field. Although Howard outranked Hancock, Howard agreed to cooperate. Howard retained tactical command of the battlefield while Hancock set about putting together the defenses of Cemetery Hill. This arrangement remained in place until Meade arrived on the battlefield that night and assumed command.

                          Consequently, in this scene, you see Hancock's personal headquarters flag (2nd Corps) and Howard's headquarters flag (11th Corps) as the defenses are developed. You also see Doubleday's flag (white with blue circle).

                          The coward Slocum refused to come to the battlefield and assume command. He ranked all of them, but he was afraid to take the responsibility of command. He should have been court-martialed for dereliction of duty for that.
                          "If you want to have some fun, jine the cavalry"

                          Maj. Gen. James Ewell Brown Stuart

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                          • #14
                            I too said Gettysburg.
                            "Profanity is but a linguistic crutch for illiterate motherbleepers"

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                            • #15
                              Soooo, we shouldn't be looking for Eric to post on the "slocums best battles" pole then.

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