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Poll: Jackson's best battle

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  • Poll: Jackson's best battle

    From his performance of First Bull Run to his Valley Campaign, T.J. "Stonewall" Jackson became a legendary battlefield commander and served notably as a corps commander in the ANV.

    What was Jackson's best battlefield performance or campaign and why?

    1. First Bull Run
    2. The Valley Campaign
    3. 2nd Manassas Campaign
    4. Antietam and Harper's Ferry
    5. Chancellorsville
    25
    First Bull Run
    12.00%
    3
    The Valley Campaign
    72.00%
    18
    Second Manassas
    0.00%
    0
    Antietam and Harper's Ferry
    4.00%
    1
    Chancellorsville
    12.00%
    3
    Last edited by semperpietas; 27 Dec 12, 22:11.
    "Hit hard when you start, but don't start until you have everything ready." - Lt. Gen. James Longstreet

    Pyrrhus Travels West:
    Hanno the Infamous, General of Carthage, Rb Mhnt of Sicily

  • #2
    Originally posted by semperpietas View Post
    From his performance of First Bull Run to his Valley Campaign, T.J. "Stonewall" Jackson became a legendary battlefield commander and served notably as a corps commander in the ANV.

    What was Jackson's best battlefield performance or campaign and why?

    1. First Bull Run
    2. The Valley Campaign
    3. 2nd Manassas Campaign
    4. Antietam and Harper's Ferry
    5. Chancellorsville
    I apologize, but I forgot to put Fredericksburg on the list.
    "Hit hard when you start, but don't start until you have everything ready." - Lt. Gen. James Longstreet

    Pyrrhus Travels West:
    Hanno the Infamous, General of Carthage, Rb Mhnt of Sicily

    Comment


    • #3
      I went with the Valley. He did not do to well in the beginning but wound up defeating 3 different armies. I think the biggest accomplishment though was the fear that he put in Washington. The avalanche effect that this caused did more for the Confederacy than the actual victories. That is the removal of troops due McClellan caused him to be even more cautious and we all know the rest of the story.
      This campaign also "made" his reputation. I think it caused fear in some Union men whenever his presence was on a battlefield. I seem to recall reading that there was a fear of Jackson turning up behind them at any given moment. Sorry cannot remember where.
      Is she crying? There's no crying in baseball.

      Comment


      • #4
        the Valley

        he kicked butt and didn't take names.

        what a masterpiece of maneuver
        Human beings are the only creatures who are able to behave irrationally in the name of reason.

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        • #5
          I went with the Valley campaign. As Kick pointed out, it was a fine example of the operational art of using maneuver to achieve his strategic goals. His victories in that campaign also had the added benefit of increasing Southern morale. Not much had gone right for the Confederacy since the First Battle of Bull Run, which obviously Old Jack played a very important part in securing a Rebel victory.

          Comment


          • #6
            Easily The Valley. Jackson was a sound strategist and here is where he really distinguished himself.

            Comment


            • #7
              Valley Campaign without question. At Chancellorsville Stonewall was just lucky he faced the notoriously incompetent IX Corps.
              "I think I understand what military fame is; to be killed on the field of battle and have your name misspelled in the newspapers." William Tecumseh Sherman

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Jack Torrance View Post
                Valley Campaign without question. At Chancellorsville Stonewall was just lucky he faced the notoriously incompetent IX Corps.
                Wow. Seriously?

                Do you actually know anything about the Battle of Chancellorsville? This comment suggests that you really don't.
                "If you want to have some fun, jine the cavalry"

                Maj. Gen. James Ewell Brown Stuart

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                • #9
                  I voted for Antietam, on the grounds that it was an excellent defensive operation. Not knowing that the Union command had General Lee's battle plans, (three cigars for example), Jackson prevented a rout by a careful defensive battle.
                  Last edited by Nickuru; 02 Jan 13, 02:35. Reason: spelling
                  When looking for the reason why things go wrong, never rule out stupidity, Murphy's Law Nº 8
                  Those who do not remember history are doomed to repeat it. George Santayana
                  "Ach du schwein" a German parrot captured at Bukoba GEA the only prisoner taken

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Eric Wittenberg View Post
                    Wow. Seriously?

                    Do you actually know anything about the Battle of Chancellorsville? This comment suggests that you really don't.
                    Yeah, seriously!

                    Here, I'll quote a paragraph from a real historian that neatly summarizes what I mean.

                    "For the Federals it was pure mischance that John Reynold's First Corps was not dug in on the army's right flank (mainly due to bad communications Reynolds got a late start, my comment). Then the Federals misinterpreted the sighting at the Furnace (here Sickles' III Corp advance to Catherine Furnace left a mile wide gap in the line. Shades of Gettysburg). Even Colonel Chilton misinterpreting Lee's order proved to be a blessing in disguise. But most of all, it was purely good fortune for the Confederacy that when Stonwall Jackson finally signaled the charge, he was aiming squarely at the ineptly lead Eleventh Corps under the Army of the Potomac. And, in the final irony, it was because Joe Hooker had recognized that ineptitude that the Eleventh Corp was posted were it was."

                    Chancellorsville: Stephen W. Sears, page 271.
                    "I think I understand what military fame is; to be killed on the field of battle and have your name misspelled in the newspapers." William Tecumseh Sherman

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Jack Torrance View Post
                      Yeah, seriously!

                      Here, I'll quote a paragraph from a real historian that neatly summarizes what I mean.

                      "For the Federals it was pure mischance that John Reynold's First Corps was not dug in on the army's right flank (mainly due to bad communications Reynolds got a late start, my comment). Then the Federals misinterpreted the sighting at the Furnace (here Sickles' III Corp advance to Catherine Furnace left a mile wide gap in the line. Shades of Gettysburg). Even Colonel Chilton misinterpreting Lee's order proved to be a blessing in disguise. But most of all, it was purely good fortune for the Confederacy that when Stonwall Jackson finally signaled the charge, he was aiming squarely at the ineptly lead Eleventh Corps under the Army of the Potomac. And, in the final irony, it was because Joe Hooker had recognized that ineptitude that the Eleventh Corp was posted were it was."

                      Chancellorsville: Stephen W. Sears, page 271.
                      There is a difference in saying XI Corps is incompetent & saying the LEADERSHIP is incompetent. There was nothing wrong with those men per se.

                      Edit: I would call them unlucky before I called them inept.
                      The muffled drums sad roll has beat the soldier's last tatoo. No more on life's parade shall meet that brave and fallen few.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by hellboy30 View Post
                        There is a difference in saying XI Corps is incompetent & saying the LEADERSHIP is incompetent. There was nothing wrong with those men per se.

                        Edit: I would call them unlucky before I called them inept.
                        Very true...1-8 years later, in Europe, those same types of German troops, when properly lead, would be trouncing two of the great landpowers in Europe.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by mikeck View Post
                          Very true...1-8 years later, in Europe, those same types of German troops, when properly lead, would be trouncing two of the great landpowers in Europe.
                          Heck, those SAME troops went West with XII Corps & then were combined to make the new XX Corps & fought well in the West.
                          http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/XX_Corps_(ACW)
                          The muffled drums sad roll has beat the soldier's last tatoo. No more on life's parade shall meet that brave and fallen few.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Jack Torrance View Post
                            Yeah, seriously!

                            Here, I'll quote a paragraph from a real historian that neatly summarizes what I mean.

                            "For the Federals it was pure mischance that John Reynold's First Corps was not dug in on the army's right flank (mainly due to bad communications Reynolds got a late start, my comment). Then the Federals misinterpreted the sighting at the Furnace (here Sickles' III Corp advance to Catherine Furnace left a mile wide gap in the line. Shades of Gettysburg). Even Colonel Chilton misinterpreting Lee's order proved to be a blessing in disguise. But most of all, it was purely good fortune for the Confederacy that when Stonwall Jackson finally signaled the charge, he was aiming squarely at the ineptly lead Eleventh Corps under the Army of the Potomac. And, in the final irony, it was because Joe Hooker had recognized that ineptitude that the Eleventh Corp was posted were it was."

                            Chancellorsville: Stephen W. Sears, page 271.
                            It doesn't help that you called it the Ninth Corps in your original post.
                            "Hit hard when you start, but don't start until you have everything ready." - Lt. Gen. James Longstreet

                            Pyrrhus Travels West:
                            Hanno the Infamous, General of Carthage, Rb Mhnt of Sicily

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Jack Torrance View Post
                              Yeah, seriously!

                              Here, I'll quote a paragraph from a real historian that neatly summarizes what I mean.

                              "For the Federals it was pure mischance that John Reynold's First Corps was not dug in on the army's right flank (mainly due to bad communications Reynolds got a late start, my comment). Then the Federals misinterpreted the sighting at the Furnace (here Sickles' III Corp advance to Catherine Furnace left a mile wide gap in the line. Shades of Gettysburg). Even Colonel Chilton misinterpreting Lee's order proved to be a blessing in disguise. But most of all, it was purely good fortune for the Confederacy that when Stonwall Jackson finally signaled the charge, he was aiming squarely at the ineptly lead Eleventh Corps under the Army of the Potomac. And, in the final irony, it was because Joe Hooker had recognized that ineptitude that the Eleventh Corp was posted were it was."

                              Chancellorsville: Stephen W. Sears, page 271.
                              Have you finished reading the book?
                              In all my perplexities and distresses, the Bible has never failed to give me light and strength.
                              Robert E. Lee

                              Comment

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