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Poll: Sherman's Best Battle or Campaign

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  • Poll: Sherman's Best Battle or Campaign

    William T. Sherman is often cited as part of the Union's winning triumvirate of generals, second only to Grant himself. Sherman himself envisioned hard war, and like Grant, rose from a Colonelcy to effectively commanding an army group.

    Was do you think was Sherman's Best Battlefield Performance or Campaign and why?

    1. First Bull Run

    2. Shiloh

    3. Arkansas Post

    4. The Vicksburg Campaign

    5. Chattanooga

    6. The Atlanta Campaign

    7. The March to the Sea

    8. The Bentonville Campaign
    20
    First Bull Run
    0.00%
    0
    Shiloh
    0.00%
    0
    Arkansas Post
    0.00%
    0
    Vicksburg Campaign
    0.00%
    0
    Chattanooga
    0.00%
    0
    The Atlanta Campaign
    25.00%
    5
    The March to the Sea
    65.00%
    13
    The Bentonville Campaign
    10.00%
    2
    "Hit hard when you start, but don't start until you have everything ready." - Lt. Gen. James Longstreet

    Pyrrhus Travels West:
    Hanno the Infamous, General of Carthage, Rb Mhnt of Sicily

  • #2
    March to the Sea.
    that is one for the record books.
    to cut your own supply line and send back all the un necessary troops, and venture across 200 miles of enemy territory
    with no other support except what you carry with you.

    carrying with you the knowledge that no rescue will come and the only option is success or utter failure
    this was as impressive a military operation as I can think of.
    Human beings are the only creatures who are able to behave irrationally in the name of reason.

    Comment


    • #3
      Well definitely not Shiloh! I would agree with Kick. The March to the Sea took a lot of planning and to me, that's where great general shine, planning and logistics

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by mikeck View Post
        Well definitely not Shiloh! I would agree with Kick. The March to the Sea took a lot of planning and to me, that's where great general shine, planning and logistics
        I included Shiloh because despite his incredulous state of disbelief at the initial Confederate assault, Sherman, along with McClernand, managed first to stabilize his division and then even managed a counterattack along the crossroads. This stopped Polk's attack dead in the water, and forced Beauregard to commit his reserves to keep Polk's attack rolling forward. I would say that Sherman's best tactical performance of the war was in his role in the counterattack at the crossroads.
        Last edited by semperpietas; 24 Dec 12, 20:08.
        "Hit hard when you start, but don't start until you have everything ready." - Lt. Gen. James Longstreet

        Pyrrhus Travels West:
        Hanno the Infamous, General of Carthage, Rb Mhnt of Sicily

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by KICK View Post
          March to the Sea.
          that is one for the record books.
          to cut your own supply line and send back all the un necessary troops, and venture across 200 miles of enemy territory
          with no other support except what you carry with you.

          carrying with you the knowledge that no rescue will come and the only option is success or utter failure
          this was as impressive a military operation as I can think of.
          Agreed. That's what I went with. Sherman's incredibly audacious march truly made Georgia howl and in doing so, gutted the very heart out of the Confederacy by his army foraging liberally and living off the best the region had to offer, while destroying the sole means for rapid transit wherever he found it, the railroads. Sherman deliberately marched his army through the counties of Georgia that produced the greatest yield amounts of food crops and livestock, so they were never hungry until they hit the final stretch of largely untilled pine barrens before Savannah. As soon as Savannah fell, his troops were immediately resupplied by the Federal fleet offshore. The City of Savannah, with all its munitions, supplies, cottonbales and etc. proved a wonderful Christmas present for President Lincoln.
          "Profanity is but a linguistic crutch for illiterate motherbleepers"

          Comment


          • #6
            I agree with March to the Sea. But if it was Worst Battle than Kennesaw Mountain would be it.

            Eagles may fly; but weasels aren't sucked into jet engines!

            "I'm not expendable; I'm not stupid and I'm not going." - Kerr Avon, Blake's 7

            What didn't kill us; didn't make us smarter.

            Comment


            • #7
              I would go with the march to the sea as well for destroying really the heartland and railroads of the Confederacy and for the planing that Sherman put into such a campaign.
              "There is no justice among men."- Tsar Nicholas II

              “People never lie so much as after a hunt, during a war or before an election.” - Otto Von Bismarck

              "It is always easier to fight for one's principles than to live up to them." - Alfred Adler

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              • #8
                No, I understand. I would just be surprised if anyone thought that Shiloh was his best performance

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                • #9
                  March To The Sea for me as well.
                  Beer is proof that God loves us and wants us to be happy.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I went with March to the sea for all the reasons already stated. It was a bold move and well executed. However I think Atlanta was a job well done. He captured a city with little loss of men and no major battles by maneuver. Admittedly he was facing Joe Johnston who loved to retreat but still it was a major accomplishment which led to te March.
                    Is she crying? There's no crying in baseball.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by midaeu View Post
                      However I think Atlanta was a job well done. He captured a city with little loss of men and no major battles by maneuver. Admittedly he was facing Joe Johnston who loved to retreat but still it was a major accomplishment which led to te March.
                      So what was Kennesaw Mountain? A love in?
                      Eagles may fly; but weasels aren't sucked into jet engines!

                      "I'm not expendable; I'm not stupid and I'm not going." - Kerr Avon, Blake's 7

                      What didn't kill us; didn't make us smarter.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Clearly Atlanta. Accomplished the same thing as Grant during the Overland Campaign with much fewer casualties.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I wouldn't say Joe Johnston loved to retreat. I would say that he knew the only way to save Atlanta was a fighting withdrawal. The other option was to stand your ground and fight...which is what Hood did to the detriment of the army.

                          I would say though that Atlanta was well done and fought by both Sherman and Johnston

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by mikeck View Post
                            I wouldn't say Joe Johnston loved to retreat. I would say that he knew the only way to save Atlanta was a fighting withdrawal. The other option was to stand your ground and fight...which is what Hood did to the detriment of the army.

                            I would say though that Atlanta was well done and fought by both Sherman and Johnston
                            Agree completely. J.E. Johnston didn't lose the army/war in the deep south in a single battle. J.B. Hood was the south version of Burnside, but at least Burnside got his Army out. Burnside at least had the smarts to know he was over his head. Hood didn't.
                            Eagles may fly; but weasels aren't sucked into jet engines!

                            "I'm not expendable; I'm not stupid and I'm not going." - Kerr Avon, Blake's 7

                            What didn't kill us; didn't make us smarter.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by RichardS View Post
                              Agree completely. J.E. Johnston didn't lose the army/war in the deep south in a single battle. J.B. Hood was the south version of Burnside, but at least Burnside got his Army out. Burnside at least had the smarts to know he was over his head. Hood didn't.
                              I wouldn't say Hood was Burnside bad. Hood knew that by his appointment to command the Army of Tennessee that he been given a mandate by Davis to fight. And Hood did fight. Almost of all his attacks were originally to be flanking assaults. If one thing Hood can be faulted for is not more directly supervising the attacks he ordered. One of his corps commanders, Hardee, was very recalcitrant (angry at Hood's appointment to command) and his mood may have effected his combat performance, especially at Peachtree Creek. His performance at Jonesboro may have even doomed Atlanta. The other Corps commander charge with making the flanking attacks, S.D. Lee, proved very incompetent at corps level. What was originally supposed to be a flanking assault at Ezra Church to clear a way to Sherman's rear for Stewart's Corps turned into a series of bloody frontal piecemeal attacks by Lee. Again, I fault Hood with not more directly supervising Lee. This left Stewart, whose corps spent much of the battles for Atlanta acting as Atlanta's garrison, along with Gustavus Smith's Georgia Militia.

                              Hood, did after all, come close to bagging the Army of the Ohio at Spring Hill, only to suffer a failure in command the seemingly plagued the Army of Tennessee.
                              Last edited by semperpietas; 28 Dec 12, 14:20.
                              "Hit hard when you start, but don't start until you have everything ready." - Lt. Gen. James Longstreet

                              Pyrrhus Travels West:
                              Hanno the Infamous, General of Carthage, Rb Mhnt of Sicily

                              Comment

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