Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Who marched the furthest\quickest

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Who marched the furthest\quickest

    While reading on the Prairie Grove campaign, I was amazed at the amount of marching & the speed of those marches made by the Federal infantry-I believe it rivals & perhaps beats that of the Stonewall Brigade. Does anyone have any hard numbers on miles/how quickly marches were made during the various campaigns of the Civil War? Which combat formations get the Gold/Silver/Bronze? I left my book at home, so I can't give the Federal numbers until this evening.
    The muffled drums sad roll has beat the soldier's last tatoo. No more on life's parade shall meet that brave and fallen few.

  • #2
    Found this thread from last year:
    http://www.armchairgeneral.com/forum...d.php?t=107050
    I see some claims for 30, 35, & 40 miles in a day. Does anyone know what unit made a 40 mile a day march?
    The muffled drums sad roll has beat the soldier's last tatoo. No more on life's parade shall meet that brave and fallen few.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by hellboy30 View Post
      Found this thread from last year:
      http://www.armchairgeneral.com/forum...d.php?t=107050
      I see some claims for 30, 35, & 40 miles in a day. Does anyone know what unit made a 40 mile a day march?
      Here is one that marched 23-1/2 mile in 6 hrs.

      http://www.civilwar-online.com/2011/...rsham-and.html
      In all my perplexities and distresses, the Bible has never failed to give me light and strength.
      Robert E. Lee

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by hellboy30 View Post
        Found this thread from last year:
        http://www.armchairgeneral.com/forum...d.php?t=107050
        I see some claims for 30, 35, & 40 miles in a day. Does anyone know what unit made a 40 mile a day march?
        During the Wilderness Campaign, Longstreet's Corps marched Forty Three Miles in 36 hours before it arrived on the battlefield.

        I am digging for other specifics right now. I know Dick Taylor's command did some impressive marching during the Red River Campaign, especially Walker's Texas Division.
        "Hit hard when you start, but don't start until you have everything ready." - Lt. Gen. James Longstreet

        Pyrrhus Travels West:
        Hanno the Infamous, General of Carthage, Rb Mhnt of Sicily

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by semperpietas View Post
          During the Wilderness Campaign, Longstreet's Corps marched Forty Three Miles in 36 hours before it arrived on the battlefield.

          I am digging for other specifics right now. I know Dick Taylor's command did some impressive marching during the Red River Campaign, especially Walker's Texas Division.
          I've long had a slight curiosity about why Lee seemed to expect Longstreet to be up earlier than he was on the Wilderness when actually Longstreet seems to have made a very credible march. Where does the forty-three miles figure come from, just out of curiosity? It's my understanding Longstreet was camped near Gordonsville, which is 30-35 miles from the Wilderness.
          "Liberty and Union, now and for ever, one and inseparable!" -Daniel Webster

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Viperlord View Post
            I've long had a slight curiosity about why Lee seemed to expect Longstreet to be up earlier than he was on the Wilderness when actually Longstreet seems to have made a very credible march. Where does the forty-three miles figure come from, just out of curiosity? It's my understanding Longstreet was camped near Gordonsville, which is 30-35 miles from the Wilderness.
            E.P. Alexander estimated the distance the corps marched as 43 miles.

            Lee was very disturbed by the attack on Hill's Corps before Longstreet arrived, given the un-readiness Hill's men were in. With Hill's Corps breaking, this probably affected Lee's judgement in the matter.
            "Hit hard when you start, but don't start until you have everything ready." - Lt. Gen. James Longstreet

            Pyrrhus Travels West:
            Hanno the Infamous, General of Carthage, Rb Mhnt of Sicily

            Comment


            • #7
              The Louisiana Brigade showed the Stonewall Brigade how to march in the Valley Campaign. Richard Taylor made it a habit to stop every hour for ten minutes of rest. I am not surprised Walker's Greyhounds could march well.

              Pruitt
              Pruitt, you are truly an expert! Kelt06

              Have you been struck by the jawbone of an ASS lately?

              by Khepesh "This is the logic of Pruitt"

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Pruitt View Post
                The Louisiana Brigade showed the Stonewall Brigade how to march in the Valley Campaign. Richard Taylor made it a habit to stop every hour for ten minutes of rest. I am not surprised Walker's Greyhounds could march well.

                Pruitt
                One of the more overlooked aspects of the Trans-Mississippi Campaign is the transfer of three infantry divisions, Churchill's Arkansas, Parson's Missouri, and Walker's Texas from Taylor to Price during the Red River/Camden Expedition.

                Not only did they come off of hard fighting at Mansfield and Pleasant Hill, they then marched from Shreveport to Camden and then in pursuit of Steele, all within a matter of weeks. They caught up with Steele at Jenkins Ferry on the Saline River, and were badly mishandled by Price and Kirby Smith and wrecked in bloody assaults against the fortified Union rear guard.

                All of this in three weeks.


                Edit: A Rough Map of the movement.

                Last edited by semperpietas; 02 Nov 12, 22:22.
                "Hit hard when you start, but don't start until you have everything ready." - Lt. Gen. James Longstreet

                Pyrrhus Travels West:
                Hanno the Infamous, General of Carthage, Rb Mhnt of Sicily

                Comment


                • #9
                  In addition it would also be worth asking who could march the fastest and farthest with the fewest stragglers.
                  I've always tried to teach you two things 007. First, never let them see you bleed.
                  And the second?
                  Always have an escape plan.
                  -Q

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    From Shea's "Prairie Grove" book,

                    The Missouri Divisions were on their way six hours after Blount's telegram arrived. What followed was an epic of human endurance. Between the afternoon of 3 of December & the morning of 7 of December, a period of three and a half days, the Second and Third divisions of the Army of the Frontier marched 105 & 120 miles respectively and went directly into battle at Prairie Grove. The actual distance varied from regiment to regiment, but the entire command averaged over 30 miles per day on primitive frontier roads in bitterly cold weather with only brief halts for food and rest. Lieutenant Colonel Joseph Barnes of the Twentieth Iowa believed it was the "greatest march made by any troops during the war of the rebellion", and not one of the thousands of participants would have disgreed.
                    Many of the regiments averaged over 35 miles per day. They did lose about half of their number to straggling.
                    Huston's Second Division set out at dawn on 6 December. The Federal made a "heart-breaking tramp" of thirty miles in ten hours, then dropped to the ground in Cross Hollows. After a brief halt to eat and rest, they staggered to their feet and resumed the seemingly endless trek.....the Federals covered twenty additional miles during the early morning hourson 7 December and dragged themselves through Fayetteville just as dawn was breaking.
                    An amazing march by any standards. Thanks for everyone's comments & sharing what they found.
                    The muffled drums sad roll has beat the soldier's last tatoo. No more on life's parade shall meet that brave and fallen few.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Sherman's March to the Sea may not have average speed on its side but it was definitely a marathon run.
                      Human beings are the only creatures who are able to behave irrationally in the name of reason.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        ..a lot of depends on the time of year as well.
                        I can only imagine Sedgewick's 26 mi forced march through MD to Gettysburg.
                        Anyone around MD or DC in July walking about can vouch for that.
                        Now imaging it with a wool suit, carrying a musket and a pack.
                        That being said, most considered a 10-15 mi march fairly leisurely- it probably was for those from rural areas and those being used to "foot" travel such as plowing a field with a team of horses for a full day (or as long as the horses lasted).

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Viperlord View Post
                          I've long had a slight curiosity about why Lee seemed to expect Longstreet to be up earlier than he was on the Wilderness when actually Longstreet seems to have made a very credible march. Where does the forty-three miles figure come from, just out of curiosity? It's my understanding Longstreet was camped near Gordonsville, which is 30-35 miles from the Wilderness.
                          I have not checked but there is a good chance that the difference could come from comparing nearer, furthest, and centrally deployed elements of Longstreet's Corps. A difference also pops up when discussing Sherman's march to the sea. The commands involved were deployed in a large arc in and around Atlanta. Starting a measuring point from the nearest, furthest or HQ troops can yield a large difference. Writers (especially the participants) can be loose or vauge with these distances.
                          "Put guards on all the roads, and don't let the men run to the rear."
                          Major General John Buford's final words on his deathbed.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Interesting stuff folks, great post!
                            One accurate measurement is worth a thousand expert opinions - Admiral Grace Hopper

                            "The eunuch should not take pride in his chastity."
                            Wu Cheng'en Monkey

                            Comment

                            Latest Topics

                            Collapse

                            Working...
                            X